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of existence, then he sees, and all causes 1 (hetu) vanish.

8o. When the Brahmana has reached the other shore of existence, then he sees, and all attachment (yoga) vanishes.

81.

When the Brâhmana has reached the other shore of existence, then he leaves behind him birth, old age, and death.

82 (387, ist part). The sun shines by day, the moon shines by night, the suit of armour of the king doth shine,2 the Brâhmana shines in his meditation.

83 (387, 2d part). The sun shines by day, the moon shines by night, continually, day and night, does the luminous (form of the) Buddha shine.

84.

As Brâhmanas and the like have left behind everything that is disagreeable, as my mind has consequently left behind (all passions), I have truly put an end to all pettiness.3

85. When the ardent, meditative Brâhmana has perfectly understood the (different) conditions (dharma) and their causes (the twelve nidânas), and when these ideas have become perfectly clear to him, then he casts away every particle of perplexity.

1 There being no causes there are and by befriending thy wicked no fruits (effects).-P.

kinsman (Dêvadatta) I have com? Or “the king shines in his suit mitted great evil. I pray thee of armour."

have mercy on me a sinner (and 3 Bhagavat was living at Râja- forgive me).” – P. " Pettiness” griha in the grove of Amrâpåli

, implies here bearing any ill-will when Adjatasatru came to him towards the king for his past and said : “Venerable one, I have wickedness. done thee frequently great wrong,

86. When the ardent, meditative Brâhmana has perfectly understood suffering and its cause, and when this idea (dharma) has become perfectly clear to him, then he casts away every particle of perplexity.

87 When the ardent, meditative Brâhmana has discovered the destruction of sensation (vedanâ), and when this idea has become perfectly clear to him, then he casts away every particle of perplexity.

88. When the ardent, meditative Brâhmana has discovered the cessation of all causes (hetu), and (when) this idea has become perfectly clear to him, then he casts away every particle of perplexity.

89.

When the ardent, meditative Brâhmana has discovered the cessation of sinfulness (âsravas), and when this idea has become perfectly clear to him, then he casts away every particle of perplexity.

90. When to the ardent, meditative Brâhmana all these ideas have become perfectly clear, he stands lighting up all the worlds (or the whole world) as the sun illuminates

the sky.

91. When to the ardent, meditative Brâhmana, who by

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knowledge has become emancipated from all attachment (yoga), all these ideas have become perfectly clear, he stands, having dispelled the hosts of Mâra (like the sun that illuminates the sky ?).1

Chapter on the Brahmana, the Thirty-third.

The Udânavarga compiled by Dharmatrâta is finished.

Translated into Tibetan) by the Indian Pandit Vidyaprabhakara 2 and the Lotsâva Bande-rin-tchen-mtchog ; revised and arranged by the corrector, the Lotsava Bandedpal-brtsegs.

1 These last two verses are to be his name is Vidyakaraprabha, and found condensed into one in the this, I think, is the correct reading. Mahậvagga, i. 1, 7. P. says that in the seventy-first volume of the the last seven verses were spoken Bst., at the end of the text of the by Bhagavat “while sitting cross- Udâna, I find the following note : legged at the foot of the Bodhi “ This (work) contains 1540 çlokas.” tree uninterruptedly for seven days," I am unable to explain this, unless &c. The account he gives is exactly we consider a çloka as composed of the same as that given in the Maha- four lines, each one separated by a vagga.

tchad, in the prose parts as well as According to the text of the in the versified ones, and in that seventy-first volume of the Bstan- case we might possibly be able to hgyur, and also Schmidt's Index divide the text into about that numder Kandjur, pp. 42, 46, and 50, ber of çlokas.

APPENDIX.

Verse 5, ch. i. p. 2.

Those pigeon-coloured bones,” &c. THERE were at Çravasti some newly-ordained Bhixus who were given to anger, to dress, to wearing jewels, &c., considering the body of paramount importance and caring nought for reading and hearing (the Scriptures). Bhagavat, on account of their sinfulness, went with them into a cemetery. It happened that at that time the bones of five hundred robbers had been cast away there. Bhagavat, drawing nigh, spoke as follows: “Look, Bhixus; may these bones of the dead fill you with awe, and teach you to shun regeneration, and to see the value of worldly goods.”

Verse 21, ch. i. p. 4.

" It is the law of humanity," &c.

A sea-captain had gone to sea for the seventh time, and had gathered together many jewels, &c., but a short time after he had reached his home with all this shining heap, he died. The king then confiscated all his widow's treasures, and she died shortly afterwards through grief (at her loss), and this was the origin (nidâna) of this gâtha.

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