A History of the Revolutions in Europe Since the Downfal of Napoleon: Comprising Those of France, Belgium and Poland

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S. Hanmer, 1831 - 408 Seiten

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Seite 375 - The Representatives of the people of FRANCE, formed into a NATIONAL ASSEMBLY, considering that ignorance, neglect, or contempt of human rights, are the sole causes of public misfortunes and corruptions of Government...
Seite 375 - ... ever kept attentive to their rights and their duties: that the acts of the legislative and executive powers of Government, being capable of being every moment compared with the end of political institutions, may be more respected: and also, that the future claims of the citizens, being directed by simple and incontestable principles, may always tend to the maintenance of the Constitution, and the general happiness.
Seite 377 - The unrestrained communication of! thoughts and opinions being one of the most precious rights of man, every citizen may speak, write, and publish freely, provided he is responsible for the abuse of this liberty in cases determined by the law.
Seite 375 - I. Men are born and always continue free and equal in respect of their rights. Civil distinctions, therefore, can be founded only on public utility. II. The end of all political associations is the preservation of the natural and imprescriptible rights of man; and these rights are liberty, property, security, and resistance of oppression.
Seite 359 - They never fail who die In a great cause : the block may soak their gore ; Their heads may sodden in the sun ; their limbs Be strung to city gates and castle walls — But still their spirit walks abroad. Though years Elapse, and others share as dark a doom, They but augment the deep and sweeping thoughts Which overpower all others, and conduct The world at last to freedom.
Seite 376 - Political liberty consists in the power of doing whatever does not injure another. The exercise of the natural rights of every man, has no other limits than those which are necessary to secure to every other man the free exercise of the same rights ; and these limits are determinable only by the law.
Seite 107 - Their cause appeared to me to be just, the dangers immense — the necessity imperative — my duty sacred — I hastened to the midst of this valiant people, followed by my family, and wearing those colours which, for the second time, have marked among us the triumph of liberty.
Seite 364 - ... regulations and ordinances necessary for the execution of the laws and the safety of the State.
Seite 373 - YE sons of freedom, wake to glory! Hark! hark! what myriads bid you rise! Your children, wives, and grandsires hoary, Behold their tears, and hear their cries! Shall hateful tyrants, mischief breeding, With hireling hosts, a ruffian band, Affright and desolate the land, While peace and liberty lie bleeding? To arms! to arms! ye brave! Th" avenging sword unsheath ; March on!
Seite 376 - The nation is essentially the source of all sovereignty ; nor can any individual, or any body of men be entitled to any authority which is not expressly derived from it.

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