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OF THE

DEBATES OF CONGRESS,

FROM 1789 TO 1856.

FROM GALES AND SEATON'S ANNALS OF CONGRESS; FROM THEIR

REGISTER OF DEBATES; AND FROM THE OFFICIAL

REPORTED DEBATES, BY JOHN C. RIVES.

BY

THE AUTHOR OF THE THIRTY YEARS' VIEW.

VOL. XI.

NEW YORK:
D. APPLETON & COMPANY, 346 & 348 BROADWAY.

1859.

MAY 4 1001

سه . هاما 2

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مرد من از دور ) ( . م . با

ENTERED according to Act of Congress, in the year 1856, by

D. APPLETON AND COMPANY,
in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York.

1

TWENTY-FIRST CONGRESS. FIRST SESSION.

PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES

THE

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

CONTINUED FROM VOL. X.

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 1830.

ry circumstances, who represented the true in

terests of the people, would be compelled, in Pay of Members.

justice to their own interest, to go home as The House then resumed the consideration soon as their pay was reduced ; and there of the resolution, offered by Mr. MoDUFFIE. would consequently be none but the aristoc

Mr. SMITH, of Virginia, spoke in opposition racy left to do the business of legislation. He
to the resolution. He said the object of the held it bad policy to render the representatives
gentleman from South Carolina, who had in- of the people at all dependent by a curtailment
troduced the resolution, seemed to him to be of their pay. It drove them to seek relief in
the application of a forfeiture of the pay of Executive patronage ; and he could refer to
members for the purpose of curtailing the hundreds who had gone into post offices, In-
length of the session of Congress. It also con- dian agencies, &c.; and he deemed this an evi-
templated an indirect reduction of the per diem dence that they were insufficiently provided for.
allowance of members. He confidently be- Mr. S. said, if the pay of other officers of
lieved it was no part of the policy of that gen- Government were reduced in the same ratio, he
tleman (Mr. MoDUFFIE) to seek popularity by would consent to reduce the pay of members
his proposition; but he believed him mistaken to six dollars a day; but not otherwise.
in relation to the effect which would result Mr. S. then went into an examination of the
from its adoption. He believed its effect business which has been done this session, in
would be to leave the business of legislation, or comparison with that transacted during former
throw it into the hands of less competent in- sessions. He concluded by remarking that he
cumbents. It went upon the hypothesis that believed the only remedy for the evil com-
one hundred days were sufficient for the trans- plained of, was to be found in short speeches
action of the public business. To this he could and long days' sessions; and he moved an
not agree; its admission would be to pass con- amendment to the amendment, providing that,
demnation upon their predecessors. The last during the remainder of the session, a motion
five sessions of Congress had averaged one to adjourn should not be in order until half
hundred and sixty-seven days; and all experi- past four o'clock.
ence proved that one hundred and seventy This proposition, involving an amendment of
days per session were necessary. It should be the rules of the House, and consequently re-
considered that the business of Congress was quiring to be laid one day on the table, was de-
continually increasing, on account of the great cided by the Speaker not to be in order.
national questions arising before them the Mr. STORRS, of New York, understood the
pension system, the international improvement object of the resolution to be the correction of
system, &c.

a moral evil, the existence of which was eviMr. S. said he did not believe it was the dent. He thought it would be a reflection on wish of the people that their representatives the House to contend that it could not transact should legislate for them without pay after they all the essential business which came before it have been in session one hundred and twenty in four months. The number of bills which days, should they find it necessary to remain were passed at the long sessions, he believed, longer. He also contended that, should this did not exceed those passed at the short sesproposition be adopted, the members in ordina- sions. He referred to the haste with which

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