Handbook to the Mastery Series

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D. Appleton, 1868 - 92 Seiten
 

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Seite 8 - In reality it is the power of habitually recomposing sentences with greater rapidity than we can utter them, and therefore it ought to be cultivated and prized, not as a faculty excellent in itself, but as a manifestation of that thorough command over foreign words, which, when accompanied by promptitude and accuracy, constitutes Mastery, and which can only be obtained by reiterations with frequency.
Seite 71 - The Variations are evolved from different languages in different degrees. The most flexible are those which have the fewest inflections, and the most inflexible are those which have the greatest number. The English is the richest language of Europe in this respect. The word my represents thirteen forms, which are used to indicate thirty-six contingencies in Latin ; and the words came, saw, etc.
Seite 72 - ... begin with the spelling and reading. But there can be no doubt that anyone who masters a few long sentences, containing altogether 200 words, may converse freely in either of those languages, without learning to read.
Seite 66 - There are 200 or 300 common words in every language, some of which necessarily occur in every colloquial sentence. The profusion of speech which we observe in children, springs from their power of wielding those 200 or 300 words, with a gradually increasing stock of nouns and verbs interspersed.
Seite 71 - Marshmau and some others have imagined that there is a grammar. But the Chinese themselves have no corresponding word, nor have they any form of speech which indicates that they have any conception of that mysterious, unreal science. It stands to reason that the Chinese must be the easiest of all languages...
Seite 27 - The true intonation is not attainable by reading aloud to a teacher, who corrects one word at a time occasionally. The teacher himself should read aloud, and the learner should echo his tones in the utterance, going over each sentence three times.
Seite 72 - THE first step to be taken by one who desires to become a good reader or speaker, is to acquire a habit of distinct articulation. Without this, the finest voice, the utmost propriety of inflection, and all the graces of articulation, fail to please. The habit of defective articulation is generally contracted in the first stages of the learner's progress...
Seite 72 - ... is a grammar. But the Chinese themselves have no corresponding word, nor have they any form of speech which indicates that they have any conception of that mysterious, unreal science. It stands to reason that the Chinese must be the easiest of all languages for a beginner, in this respect, that -' employs a smaller number of words and phrases than any other, for ordinary colloquial use.
Seite 10 - ... wish to learn a language colloquially should commit to memory nothing but practical sentences adapted for immediate use. But -generally boys are so trained, that their memory is overcharged with unmastered words and unpractical sentences, without order or coherence.
Seite vii - Variations, by mastering which he obtains a great facility in oral composition, founded upon a thorough acquaintance with the syntactical constructions.

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