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ftrously absurd, and extravagant opinions ; but 'tis as demonstrable as any proposition in Euclid, nay, 'tis as felf-evident as the first principles of any science whatsoever, that if there was absolutely no thinking at all, there could be no such thing as free thinking The creed of St. Athanasius, which fo much offends the pride of human reason, would then be swallowed as glibly, and with as little reluctance, as the gospel itself; and all the other creeds, which the church has determined to adopt, would be screen'd both from present and future attacks, and transmitted from one indolent and unthinking generation to another.

ALL, therefore, who are duly sensible of the eminent advantages resulting from this scheme, must applaud, and celebrate with high encomiums, the prudence and skill of those warm and zealous members of the christian priesthood in every age, who have carefully avoided the trouble and danger of thinking themselves, and discouraged it to the utmost in their votaries. Nothing can be more natural, or more discreet, than for a Roman-catholịc priest to preach up the necessity of sacrificing reason, blind, carnal, licentious reason to faith, and the decrees and canons of the church. And that great protestant disputant and champion Dr. Wat d, has given us a choice specimen of his wisdom, and of a genius that penetrates far into the consequences of things,

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I have farther to offer ; which, with the grounds and reasons of it, take as follows.

The licentiousness of the present age, especially with respect to its opinions, has been the subject of loud and most pathetic complaints; and many methods have been taken, if possible, utterly to eradicate, or at least to put a stop to the growth of, this evil. But as they have all been hitherto found, by experience, to be but quack remedies, I presume I may be allowed humbly to propose a noftrum, which I am confident must answer the end in view; and that is, that the exercise of thinking and reafoning be entirely abolished: which, tho' it may have somewhat of a ludicrous aspect at first, deserves the serious consideration of all who are friends to religion, and well-wishers to the peace and prosperity of their naa tive country, for the following most weighty and cogent reasons.

Ist. That there can be, in the nature of things, no other sure and infallible prevention of infidelity and heresy, and that vaa riety of strange and unwarranted opinions, which derogate from the authority of the church, and destroy the unity of its faith and order. If we admit of, and encourage thinking in any degree, this grievance may still continue, notwithftanding our most paffionate exclamations against it : For halfthinkers may be infidels; half-thinkers are the only ļikely persons to entertain mon

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ftrously absurd, and extravagant opinions ; but 'tis as demonstrable as any proposition in Euclid, nay, 'tis as self-evident as the first principles of any science whatsoever, that if there was absolutely no thinking at all, there could be no such thing as free thinking: The creed of St. Athanafius, which so much offends the pride of human reason, would then be swallowed as glibly, and with as little reluctance, as the gospel itself; and all the other creeds, which the church has determined to adopt, would be screen'd both from present and future attacks, and tranfmitted from one indolent and unthinking generation to another.

ALL, therefore, who are duly sensible of the eminent advantages resulting from this scheme, must applaud, and celebrate with high encomiums, the prudence and skill of those warm and zealous members of the christian priesthood in every age, who have carefully avoided the trouble and danger of thinking themselves, and discouraged it to the utmost in their votaries. Nothing can be more natural, or more discreet, than for a Roman-catholịc priest to preach up the necessity of sacrificing reason, blind, carnal, licentious reason to faith, and the decrees and canons of the church. And that grcat protestant difputant and champion Dr. Wat-d, has given us a choice specimen of his wisdom, and of a genius that penetrates far into the consequences of things,

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in building his defence of the trinity on this principle, – that the RATIONALE of the thing is a foreign consideration. I look upon myself as bound in gratitude to acknowledge, that this is going a great way towards what I am now asserting and plead, ing for; but as the rationale of the thing will have some weight in all controversies, till men are entirely brought off from the impertinent custom of thinking, and the inSolence of claiming a private conscience, I Shall not despair of seeing the ingenious doctor declare himself more explicitly and ful. ly on my side of the question, and support the common cause in which we are embarqued, by all his subtility and wonderful skill in metaphyficks.*

But leaving religious topics, I proceed to confirm the point by political reasons, drawn from the good of society. And here I shall build the whole of my argument up

* If any mean and malignant spirits, envying the honour which they imagine I may gain by having first proposed this fingular expedient for the advancement of religion, should cavil, and say; that, indeed, the absolute disuse of thinking is an infallible means to prevent wrong thinking, but that it will as certainly and effectually obstruct right thinking, and destroy all faith and notion of religion : To this trifling objection I shall think it sufficient to answer, that if this expedient does not promote real faith, and an inward sense of piety, it will secure a unity of outward profeffion ; which seems, even in the judgment of those who have the supreme direction and influence both in temporal and spiritual affairs, to be all that is necessary for the peace and grandeur of the church, and the security of civil government.

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on facts, and observations drawn from the original frame of human nature. That man is, in reality, a very mischievous animal, especially to his own species, is past dispute: And 'tis as undeniable, that nature intended him to be innocent and inoffensive; having neither endued him with strength equal to that of many other creatures, nor provided him with fangs and claws, wherewith to tear and destroy. But thought and contri. vance have quite altered and disturbed the harmless and peaceable state of nature, and supplied him with fatal instruments of death and torture, beyond those which the most fierce and ravenous animals are possessed of.

A GA I N, to what is it that all those wretched arts of imposition and deceit, with which the world fo much abounds, owe their rise ? unquestionably to nothing else but to the dangerous practice of thinking. If the exercise of this peftilent faculty was wholly laid aside, man would be, as the poet says of the ox, animal honeftum, a plain honest simple creature, without guile or dissimulation. And to confirm this observation, 'tis universally agreed, that that species of brutes, which seem to mimick the fagacity of the lower part of the human kind, are the fulleit of tricks, and subtle mischief. I shall only add, that 'tis evident to a demonftration, that without the help of thinking the late fatal South-Sea scheme, which was fo destructive to trade

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