Public or Private Goods?

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Brigitte Unger, Daan van der Linde, Michael Getzner
Edward Elgar Publishing, 31.03.2017 - 304 Seiten

The book explores the core public tasks that the state has traditionally provided but which increasingly are being privatized and subsumed by the private sector. The night-watchman state role of providing security is instead offered by private prisons and security guards. Legitimized by the argument of efficiency gains, social security including public housing, pensions, unemployment insurance and health care are all being gradually privatized. This book argues that on the basis of efficiency, morality and equality there is still an overwhelming need for public intervention – the res publica. Although the state still funds and regulates core domains, it provides fewer and fewer visible goods. The authors show how this apparent invisibility of the state presents serious challenges for both income equality and democracy.

 

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Inhalt

1 Introduction
1
2 Valuebased demarcation between the public and the private domain
18
security
35
a public task?
37
4 Natural disasters and future government debt
48
social security
75
5 The advantages and disadvantages of different pension system designs
77
still a public task?
95
childcare markets in the Netherlands and England
150
PART III Public goods
173
recent insights from Vienna and Amsterdam
175
a purely public task?
197
12 The role of governments in conserving and funding cultural institutions
223
the redistributive preferences of misinformed voters
253
14 Conclusions
271
Index
283

a res publica?
117
8 More health care or more beer? A curious paradox of making some economic tasks a res publica
132

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Über den Autor (2017)

Edited by Brigitte Unger, Utrecht University School of Economics, the Netherlands and former Director, Institute of Economic and Social Research WSI in Dusseldorf, Germany, Daan van der Linde, Utrecht University School of Economics, the Netherlands and Michael Getzner, Center of Public Finance and Infrastructure Policy, Department of Spatial Planning, Vienna University of Technology, Austria

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