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WISDOM.

events.

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158

Oracle for the Ladies. wanders after the future; unlocks the fecret cabinet of fate, and drawing the curtain spread before his mind, pene. destroys it ; fet no value upon so pre

Habit weakens that power, time trates into the celectial arcana of future

carious a gift ; cherish not an hope so

deceitful. Happy the man! alone thrice happy he,

FORTUNE. Who cau th o'gross effects their causes sce; Whole courage from the deeps of knowledge She is to draw mens hearts into the springs,

snares of refined coquetry,

and Nor vainly fears inevitable things : But does his walk of virtue calmly go,

laugh at their vain efforts to be reThro' il th'alarms and troubles here below.

leased. He tho' from heav'n remote, to heav'n can move,

WISDOM. With strength of mind, and pierce the fpheres above;

By her being decoyed into the fame Boldly he penetrates, with his interior light, snares, all her captives will recover Thote upper regions nature hides irom fight; their liberty; for the deceiver is And what he has observ’d, and learn'd from thence,

doomed to a just retaliation. Delights to teach, and fecrets to dispense.

FORTUNE.
DRYDEN': OVID.

She is to be beloved for the pliancy Now, to satisfy the inquisitive na- of her mind, and for the constant ture of the soul of man, is the design sweetness of her temper. of this paper, which is calculated to gratify the reasonable hopes of all the

WISDOM. young adventurers in life.

Let her not make an indiscriminate

use of these good qualificatious, or ORACLES

they will become no less infipid than WISDOM, OPENED

dangerous. LADIES.

THE

OF

FORTUNE AND

FOR

THE

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WISDOM.

WISDOM.

I cannot contradict nature, who, unhappily, has left her very little hope

A breath stains the lily, in the in that respect.

course of a day the rose fades ; let her virtues deserve to be compared to the

unchangeable and everlasting amaranth, Virtue may reverse that doom ; let and her triumph is certain. her be good, and she will prove most “ Sweet Aagrance yields the blushing rose, lovely.

Tair's the m:ik-white lily,
Yet what's the beauties they disclose

Tothole which grace the lovely Elly?" Let her not seek for art when nature has been so prodigal towards her; who çan resift the fascinating power of An excellent memory, a lively imabeauty

gination, will make her the delight of

all

FORTUNE.

FORTUNE.

Male and Female Trecs.

159

WISDOM.

all those who are to be acquainted

WISDOM. with her.

But she will miss that aim with herself, and, conscious of her own mean

ness, incessantly blush at her dear If the applause that will be given bought success. her, disorder her imagination, let re- We shall conclude this paper with membrance be her physician, and

an apt observation Dryden makes in not her tormentor.

his Tragedy of Aurengzebe:

Prudence, thou vainly in our youth art FORTUNE,

fought, A dissembled affability, a tongue

And, with age purcha.'d, art too dearly dipped in flattery, are the means by We're part the use of wir, for which we

bought : which she is to attain the art of pleas- toil: ing.

Late fruit, and planted in too cold a foil,

ALBERTUS's SECRETS OF NATÚRE.

(Continued from Page 119.) IT is necessary, before any attempt torious : for which reason they have be made to reduce to practice what has

been often been resorted to as probeen delivered, to be perfectly ac- vocatives. Let it be remarked, that quainted with the natural properties of many things are obvious to the senses, things; whether they be hot, or cold; which the power of human reason has whether of a timnid or dauntless dis. not been able to account for. Amongst position ; barren, or fruitful ; because these is the property of the magnet, to every being assimilates to itself what- attract iron, which daily experience ever is united with it. For instance, evinces. Though we know not to the lion, being an animal of natural what is owing this extraordinary prointrepidity, whosoever carries about him perty, it would be ridiculous to deny that creature's heart, eyes, or the ikin it; as absurd would it be to suppose that lies between them, is supposed to that Nature does not abound with inherit a portion of his co

courage.

The

many other marvellous secrets, because fame may

be faid of a Cock. In like they have hitherto mocked the remanner,

if the animal be barren or searches of man. The genders in trees impotent by nature, or rendered so by is another curious particular, not less any accident, whatever is associated deserving notice, and above human with him partakes of his defects, and capacity to account for. This diffevice versa if of a prolific nature. Thus rence of gender is expressly ascribed to to excite love, care must be taken to palm-trees; and what must be reckondistinguish what creatures are most ed amongst the phenomena of nature amorous, and the particular times at is, that the female unruffling its leaves, which they are most stimulated to the in dumb expression of blandishment, propagation of their species, because inclines to the male, seeming to court the virtue thereby communicated will its protection. A rope being faftened be proportionably greater. The swal- to both, the female immediately relow is found by observation to be sumes 'its former, ercet posture, as much addicted to copulation ; little, if though the gratification it sought were at all inferior to the dove and the secretly conveyed to it from the male, sparrow, whose carnal appetite is nou by means of this conductor. Why, 158

therefore,

Oracle for the Ladies, wanders after the future; unlocks the fecret cabinet of fate, and drawing the

Habit wea! curtain spread before his mind, pene- destroys it; fe trates into the celectial arcana of future

carious a gift
deceitful.

events,

Happy the man! alone thrice happy he,
Who can th o'gross effects their causes sce;
Whole courage from the deeps of knowledge She is to dra!
springs,

snares of refin
Nor vainiň fears inevitable things :
But does his walk of virtue calmly go,

laugh at their Thro' il th'alarms and troubles here below. lealed. He cho' from heav'n remote, to heav'n can

move, With strength of mind, and pierce the fpheres above ;

By her being Boldly he penetrates, with his interior light, snares, all her Thotë upper regions na ure hides irom right; their liberty ; And what he has observ’d, and learn'd from

doomed to aj thence, Delights to teach, and fecrets to dispense. DBYDEN': OVID.

She is to be Now, to satisfy the inquisitive na- of her mind ture of the soul of man, is the design sweetness of of this paper, which is calculated to gratify the reasonable hopes of all the young adventurers in life.

Let her

use of the FORTUNE AND

they will WISDOM, OPINED

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ALBERTUS:

IT is Decay, before be made : TECUCE to prilica been delivered to be quainted with the natural

S.

to

PHILEMON Holland, commonly 3.

called “ The Trandator General of dipped is, ze the more

the Age," was educated in the uni. which is so the art is:

versity of Cambridge. He was, for many years, a school-malter at Co.

ventry, where he practised phyfic and the

altro e
ogy.

He translated Livy, Pliny's hirt Naturai Hiltorv; Plutarch's Morals, vere Suetonius, Ammianus Marcellinus, ious

Xenophon's Cyropædia, and Camden's gy; Britannia, into English, and the geoselle, graphical part of Speed's Theatre of found

Great Britain, into Latin. The Bri. which tannia, to which he made

many

usefui deter- additions, was the moit valuable of his hings ; whether they be

mirates works. It is surprising that a man of His

two professions could find time e World, translate so much; but it appears from .ed, as the the date of the Cyropedia, that he con. 12 for many tinued to translate till he was eighty d to intro

years of age. Ob. 1636, Æt. 85.

He made the following epigram He is cele

upon writing a large folio with a single Altral inspec

pen.
À the Quadri-
of canons or

With one sole pen I writ this book, 13

Made of a grey goofe quill, & the true fide

A pen it was when it I took, s, This work has

a pen I leave it still, into Englih, but

a manner to do ho. There were not wanting in his time wie original and learn- people, who asserted, he was affisted in or his translator. The these voluminous works by the devil ; and complete edition of buit if that had been the case, Satan works in Latin, is that of must then have had but a very impertolio, in 1551. Little pro- fect knowledge of the French, from made in aitronomy from the which all Holland's translations were Hipparchus to Ptolemy's, and made. However, he is placed in the 2: the principles on which his lift of great men accused of magic, by n was founded, has been found Naudeus. VOL. I:

х

Philemond

! re account

whether of a timid of pofition ; barren, or free ttery being alomilates e erer is united with it

. the lion, being an intrepidity, whcloevera that creature's heart

, that lies between die inherit a portion et fame may be faid manner, if the impotent by nature any accident

,

A

with him prze

excite dilinguid ARDION which

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tors.

160

Albertus's Secrets of Nature. therefore, may not the like hidden wine: take a spunge, ard dip it in a wonders belong to other parts of Na- vefiel containing what is given you for ture's works, and why frould the idea genuine wine; fqueeze the spunge, that they do, be ridiculed, before ex- and it will emit water if the wine has periments have ascertained a contrary been adulterated, if otherwise it will opinion ? Many of the ancients' have emit nothing. Aristotle says, that to related as surprising appearances, what cure the piles, the Itanding on a lion's are no longer considered as such, be- kin is an effectual remedy. A mouse ing univerially known and verified. applied to the punture inade by the Several operations that have happened bite of a scorpion, is supposed to exwithin our orin remembrance, would tract the virus. The sporge stone have staggered the belief of our ances- being suspended from the neck of a

The son of Merue relates in his child who is a liced with a cough, treatise on animals, that if a pregnant gives relief in the most violent fits. woman puton the garment of a man, and The hairs growing about the priapus, it be worn by him immediately after or an ass being pulverised, and given the has tak cff, it removes the in any liquid to be diunk, in the quartan. In another place he says, person who has fivallowed the insufion that a leopard will flee from a hunian an irresistible necessity of breaking skull. Galen afirms, that the fight wird; the faine purpose may be efor hiss of a cockatrice causes death, fected by the eggs of ants.

Some phiand to eat of it when dead is equally lolophers have asserted, that the fatal. Some countries, says another feathers of an eagle being in contact author, produce vipers, whose nature with those of any other bird, consumes is such, that on seeing their own like them. The smelling to an extinguished neis they die immcdiately; nay, fomco lamp will, it is said, cause an abortion have gone so far as to say, that the in pregnant wonen. Fumigating fame effećt attends their seeing a re- with aft's lungs, was a method succes. semblance of themselves receted by a fully praclised by those who had a mind mirror, which those who entertained to purge their houses of venomous such an opinion carried about them

To recover the alienated for that purpose, A dead man's bones afection of a wife, 'tis recommended being suspended over perions who lur- to extract the marrow from the left leg fered from a pain in the boweis, have of a wolf and carry it aboui. Hair is been said to remove the complaint ; prevented from growing by rubbing and to prevent pregnancy in women, the roots with a compofition made of it was not unusual to hold over them the left thigh of a male ostrich, boiled thic teeth first shed (f a muje chiki, be down with oil. To make persons before they had fallen to ihe ground. tray themselves in their sleep, let the The herb forrel, according to the opi: heart of a dove and the head of a frag nion of Galen, is ct a laxctive nature, be diied and reduced to a powder, and has been recommended to theie which laid on the breast of him or her wko labour under crophulous dilor- whose secrets you wish to disccver, will ders. To make a beast return to his make them divulge their molt hidden ftall, let his sorchead ke lineared with thoughts. A mart's tooth apperded hog's lard. Greaie the tongue of an to the neck of a child, removes the ox with any kind of luet, and he will putin that commonly attends the cutnot feed, but ahliain from provender ting ci' the tccth. Birts are caught by till death, unless it be cleanied with throwing in their way any kind of falt and vinegar. The crowing of a grain previouflytteped in lees of wine cock may be prevented by anrointing and the juice of wolf's bane, which fo his head with oil. Ji is laid that the intoxicates them, that they beconte an following method will enable you to caly prey.

creatures.

dicover whathan winter ha rived wi:h

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