Tracts

Cover
C. Dilly, 1789 - 281 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 194 - As to Jortin, whether I look back to his verse, to his prose, to his critical, or to his theological works, there are few authors to whom I am so much indebted for rational entertainment or for solid instruction. Learned he was, without pedantry. He was ingenious, without the affectation of singularity. He was a lover of truth, without hovering over the gloomy abyss of scepticism ; and a friend to free inquiry, without roving into the dreary and pathless wilds of latitudinarianism.
Seite 107 - We have left it flourishing in the middle of the field, having rooted up, or cut down, all that kept it from the eyes and admiration of the world: but after some continuance it shall begin to lose the beauty it had; the storms of ambition shall beat her great boughs and branches one against another; her leaves shall fall off, her limbs wither, and a rabble of barbarous nations enter the field and cut her down.
Seite 193 - I have reason to believe, by personal prejudices. But I may with confidence appeal to writings, which have long contributed to public amusement, and have often been honoured by public approbation ; to the Life of Philip...
Seite 195 - ... name of friend. The importance of commendation, as well to him who bestows as to him who claims it, he estimated not only with justice, but with delicacy ; and therefore he neither wantonly lavished it, nor withheld it austerely.
Seite 195 - ... pursuit of it, if he does not excite our astonishment by the rapidity of his strides, he at least secures our confidence by the firmness of his step. To the examination of positions advanced by other men, he always brought a mind which neither prepossession had seduced nor malevolence polluted.
Seite 95 - Laws; should not then, the Ends of both be the same: the Benefit of Mankind? But where is the sense of a general Satire, if the whole Species be degenerated? And where is the Justice of it, if it be not?
Seite 195 - He imposed not his own conjectures as infallible and irresistible truths, nor endeavoured to give an air of importance to trifles by dogmatical vehemence. He could...
Seite 193 - Leland unites the man of taste with the man of learning ; and shows himself to have possessed not only a competent knowledge of the Greek language, but that clearness in his own conceptions, and that animation in his feelings, which enabled him to catch the real meaning, and to preserve the genuine spirit of the most perfect orator that Athens ever produced. Through the Dissertation upon Eloquence...
Seite 195 - His style, though inartificial, is sometimes elevated ; though familiar, it is never mean ; and though employed upon various topics of theology, ethics, and criticism, it is not arrayed in any delusive resemblance, either of solemnity, from fanatical cant ; of profoundness, from scholastic jargon ; of precision, from the crabbed formalities of cloudy philologists ; or of refinement, from the technical babble of frivolous connoisseurs.
Seite 151 - ... on the astonished and enraptured reader. Often has my mind hung with fondness and with admiration over the crowded, yet clear and luminous galaxies of imagery diffused through the works of Bishop Taylor...

Bibliografische Informationen