Manual of International Law: For the Use of Navies, Colonies and Consulates, Band 1

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M. Nyhoff, 1884 - 1201 Seiten
 

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Seite 324 - London, (the act of God, the queen's enemies, fire, and all and every other dangers and accidents of the seas, rivers, and navigation, of whatever nature and kind soever, excepted,) unto order or to assigns, he or they paying freight for the said goods at 51.
Seite 464 - ... danger to his own vessel, crew, and passengers (if any), to stay by the other vessel until he has ascertained that she has no need of further assistance, and to render to the other vessel, her master, crew, and passengers (if any...
Seite 465 - If he fails so to do, and no reasonable cause for such failure is shown, the collision shall, in the absence of proof to the contrary, be deemed to have been caused by his wrongful act, neglect, or default.
Seite 477 - Act provides that no owner or master of any ship shall be answerable to any person whatever for any loss or damage occasioned by the fault or incapacity of any qualified pilot acting in charge of such ship within any district where the employment of a pilot is compulsory by law.
Seite 326 - ... shall have transferred to and vested in him all rights of suit, and be subject to the same liabilities in respect of such goods as if the contract contained in the bill of lading had been made with himself.
Seite 327 - Every bill of lading in the hands of a consignee or endorsee for valuable consideration, representing goods to have been shipped on board a vessel, shall be conclusive evidence of such shipment as against the master or other person signing the same, notwithstanding that such goods or some part thereof may not have been so shipped...
Seite 451 - It would be obviously inconvenient and dangerous to society, and would subject the laws to continual infraction, and the government to degradation, If such individuals or merchants did not owe temporary and local allegiance, and were not amenable to the jurisdiction of the country.
Seite 327 - ... notwithstanding that such goods or some part thereof may not have been so shipped, unless such holder of the bill of lading shall have had actual notice at the time of receiving the same that the goods had not been in fact laden on board: Provided, that the master or other person so signing may exonerate himself in respect of such misrepresentation by showing that it was caused without any default on his part, and wholly by the fraud of the shipper or of the holder, or some person under whom...
Seite 471 - But when, as in this case, a ship at the time of a collision is in actual violation of a statutory rule intended to prevent collisions, it is no more than a reasonable presumption that the fault, if not the sole cause, was at least a contributory cause of the disaster. In such a case the burden rests upon the ship of showing not merely that her fault might not have been one of the causes, or that it probably was not, but that it could not have been.
Seite 465 - Passengers (if any), such assistance as may be practicable and as may be necessary in order to save them from any danger caused by the collision ; and also to give to the Master or person in charge of the other Vessel the name of his own vessel, and...

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