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supports a grant of money to the Hamilton, Alexander, his letters during
Prince of Wales, ib. — objects of his the Revolutionary War cited, 97.
foreign policy, 404 — letters of, to the Hancock, President of Congress, letter
King, 406 — India bill of, 407 --- dis- of, 94.
missed from office, 408 — injured by Hebrew poetry, characteristics of, 226.
the coalition, ib. — his policy respect. Henry VIII., odious character of, 495 —
ing the French Revolution, 409.

destitute of human feeling, 496 — sa-
France, England, and America, 118- a crificed his best friends without re-

formidable rival of England, 121 - morse, 497 — compared with Francis
once punished for attempting to gov- I. ib. — the children of, 499,
ern herself, 123— persecuted by Eng- Henry Esmond, by W. M. Thackeray,
land, 124 — wronged and misrepre- reviewed, 199 — characterized, 216.
sented, 125 — under Louis Philippe, Hillard, George S., Six Months in Italy
126 — farcical revolution of February by, noticed, 522.
in, 127 — Louis Napoleon chosen Pre- Fingham in 1645, quarrel in, about the
sident of, 128 - state of parties in, election of a military officer, 337.
129 — Napoleon's coup déiat in, 131 Hobart, Rev. Mr., of Hingham, his dis-

- condition of, thus greatly improved, pute with John Winthrop, 337.
132— military power and ambition of Horseshoe, institution of the order of the,
134.

273.
Francis I., a bad man, but not so bad as Howson, J. S., on the Life and Epistles

Henry VIII., 497 — redeeming points of St. Paul, reviewed, 173 — charac-
in his character, 498.

teristics of his work, 194.
Franklin, Dr., conduct of, in obtaining Hunt, Leigh, picture of Fox and Pitt by,

the Hutchinson letters, defended, 390 381.

as a negotiator of the peace, 397. Hurdwar, a town in India, described,
Free Blacks and Slaves, by a Cambridge 454.
Man, noticed, 528.

India, Canals of Irrigation in, 439 -
Gamaliel, the teacher of St. Paul, 176. North-western Provinces of, 440 —
Ganges, great irrigating canal from, 453

452 government improvements in, 441 —
- course and use of, 454 — extent of,

revenue system of, ib. - need of water
458 - cost of, 459 — revenue of, 460

for agriculture in, 442- first irrigat-
- objections to, considered, 461.

ing canal in, 443 — Mussulman domi-
Gardiner, Bishop, remonstrates with

minion in, 444 - English government
Mary Tudor against the Spanish

attempts to restore the canals in, 445
match, 518.

- canals to the west of the Jumna in,
George III., personal character of, 382-

446 — awful famine in, 449 — canal
keeps Lord North in office in spite of

from the Ganges in, 452 — other ca-
himself, 393 – unwilling to make

nals proposed in, 462 - contrast of
peace with America, 394 - has the

the English with the former rulers of,
coalition ministry forced upon him,

464 — rule of the East India Company
402 — threatens to leave England,

in, 465 — Note to the article on Irri-
403 - intrigues to defeat the minis ,

gating Canals in, 531.
ters, 407.

Indian Tribes, H. R. Schoolcraft on the
George IV., flagitious private character

History and Condition of the reviewed,
of, 382.

245 — national character of the work,
Gilmor, Robert, generously aids Cole,

247 - Oneida stone reverenced by
the painter, 317.

the, 251 — inscription on Dighton
Goerlitz, Countess de, murder of, 438.

rock and the skeleton in armor, as
Government not identical with the peo-

antiquities of the, 252 — other in-
ple, 42 — common object of all, 44 —

scriptions by, 254 — pictography of,
necessarily constrains the people, 45.

255 — engravings to illustrate the arts
See Political Philosophy.

of the, 256 — legends and myths of,
Greene, General, letters of, 87.

258 — vital and industrial statistics of,

260.

Italy, Six Months in, by George S. Hil-
Hall, Edward B., Memoir of Mary L. lärd, noticed, 522.

Ware by, reviewed, 145.
Hallam, Mr., unjustly prefers Henry Knighthood, orders of, in America, 272
VIII. to Francis I., 497.

- order of the Horseshoe, in Virginia,

273 — of the Albion Knights, in New 344 -- defence of the peculiar limita-
Jersey, 274 - of the Cincinnati, 285 — tion of suffrage in, 345 - Old Planters

of St. John, in the West Indies, admitted to vote in, 346 — the law
530. Note.

created but little discontent in, 347 —

the rights of non-freemen protected
Lafayette, devotion of, to Washington, 88. in, 348 — great power of the Assist-
Lamartine in the Revolution of 1848, 127. ants in, 349 -Council for life in, 351 -
Laws should grow up gradually, accord policy of inviting noblemen and gen-

ing to occasions, 367 - excellence of, tlemen to emigrate to, ib. — early aris-
in Massachusetts, 369.

tocratic spirit in, 352 - early develop-
Lee, General Charles, letter of, 104. ment of republican feelings in, 353 —
Liberty, political, cannot be entire, 108 — contest of these two elements in, 354

indefinite aspirations for, 110 — limited - unjust charges against the magis-
for our good, 111 - does not imply trates of, 358 — how a representation
freedom from restraint, 112.

of the people was established in, 359
Libri, M., note to the article on the case separate representation of the towns
of, 533

in, 362- how the first code of laws
Life-Drama, by A. Smith, analysis of was established in, 364 — first move-
the, 5.

ment for a system of laws, 365 - Win-
Lincoln, General, character of, 91 - let throp's idea of the manner in which a
ters of, 92.

code of laws should grow up in, 367 —
Livingston, Robert R., admitted into the danger that the laws of, might be dis-
Cincinnati, 301.

allowed in England, 368 — Cotton's
Louis Napoleon, Political and Historical theocratic system rejected in, 369 —

Works of, reviewed, 118 — called to excellence of the system finally esta-
the throne by the French people, 121 blished in, ib.- necessary severity of
- conduct of, after the revolution of the government of, 370 - persecuted
February, 128 — political ideas of, 129 by Roger Williams, 371 — stands in

on the constitution of America, 130 no need of an apology, 372.
- his coup d'état, 131 - great success Merman, The Forsaken, a poem, 19.
of, 132

Millet, Mrs., supposed spontaneous com-
Louis Philippe, government of, 126. bustion of, 435.

Mirabeau on the order of the Cincinnati,
Mary Tudor, Queen, did not deserve the 297.

epithet of Bloody, 494 — training of, Miracles, alleged impossibility of, 75 -
under her admirable mother, 499 - proved by modern science, 76.
never accused of levity, 501 – precise, Montgomery, General, character of, 103.
religious, and charitable, 502-gene. Moore, Thomas, petty character of the
rous and grateful, but not amiable, 503 Diary of, 374.
- sharp and shrewish, 504 — gives a
committee of the Council a sharp Napoleon dynasty always popular in
scolding, 505 — too much attached to France, 121 — no Englishman dares
Spain, 506 — doubtful friendship of to write the history of, 123.
the emperor for, 507 — gives audience Nature, improper deification of, in poetry,
to his ambassador, 509 — policy of 22.
France respecting, 511 – her fancy Negro slaves, not protected by law, 473
for Philip ripens into passion, 512 — - an inferior race, but still human,
betrays her feelings unconsciously to 476 — incapable of freedom, but need-
Renard, 513 — accepts the offer of ing kindness and care, 477 - not pro-
Philip's hand, 518 – ungrateful to perty, 478 — rightfully bound to servi-
her subjects, 519 — allows Renard- to tude, if protected by law, 480.
speak of them as enemies, 520 — de- Newburg Letters, origin and language of
ceived in all her hopes, 521.

the, 281 -- authorship of, 283.
Massachusetts, Society of the Cincinnati Noailles, ambassador of France to Eng-

in, 293, 300 — Early History of, 331 land, negotiations of with Mary Tudor,
- how it should be studied, 334 -sa 511.
gacity and statesmanship of the found- Noble, L. L., Life and Works of Thomas
ers of, 335 — court of Assistants in, Cole by, reviewed, 302. See Cole.
342- original plan of the settlement North, Lord, as a minister and a man,
of, 343 — had a right to exclude all 383 not inimical to America, and
who were not invited to come thither, opposed to the war, 384 — opposed by
VOL. LXXVII. - NO. 161.

47

Fox. 392

— wishes to retire, 393 - chief source of power, 35 — knowledge
scene in the House at the resignation has not improved government morals,
of, 395 — coalizes with Mr. Fox. 401 36 - power belongs to the resolate
Veelists. Eszlish, pictures of real life by, and the self-willed, 38— the time for
200 — Fielding at the head of. ib. studying: 39 — cannot be summed up

ins single principle, 40 — possible im-
Oneida stone, Schoolcraft's account of provements in, 41 - the government
the. 251.

and the people not identical. 42 - bat
Oswald. Mr. as a negotiator of the peace radically distinct, 43 — common ob-
at Versailles, 397.

ject of all governments, 44 — the peo-

ple are necessarily ruled and con-
Paine, Thomas, revolutionary services strained, 45 — government, though
of, 95- letters of, 96.

popular in its origin, becomes inde-
Park, E. A., Memoir of Professor B. B. pendent and can stand alone, 47 —

Edwards by, reviewed, 219 — his work offices are not the property of the peo-

characterized, 244. See Educards. ple, 48 — the real life of this country
Paul, St., The Life and Epistles of, by is not in the government, but in the

W.J. Conybeare and J. S. Howson, people, 50 - principle of rotation in
reviewed, 173 — birth-place of, 174– office, 51 – the machinery of office-
early training of, 176 - conversant seeking. 52 - principle of honor in,
with different races and classes of men, 54 - office belongs to the most worthy,
177 — social position of, 178 - quick 56 — the government should be rever-
and strong susceptibilities of, 180 — enced, 57 — character of our own go-
magnitude of the work assigned to, 181 vernment, 58.
- his qualifications for it, 182–in- Portugal, alliances of, by intermarriage,
tegrity of, 183 — affections and tole with Spain, 516.
rant spirit of, 184 — personal appear- Public opinion, action of, on govern-
ance of, 185 — his travels, 186 — his ments, 34.
Epistles, 187 — precise and logical as Puritan Library in Boston, attempt to
a writer, 192 — requires close atten found a, 235.
tion, 193 - full of feeling, 194. Putnam, General, letters of, 100.
Peirce, Franklin, Inaugural Address of, Putnam, Prof.

, on B. B. Edwards as a
reviewed, 118.

teacher, 228.
Pendennis, The History of, by W. M.
Thackeray, reviewed, 199.

Raikes, Charles, Notes on the North-
People, the, not identical with the govern Western Provinces of India, by, re-

ment, 42 — are necessarily ruled, 45 viewed, 439 — definition of a village
create the government and then are in India by, 446, Note - on the diffi-
subject to it, 47 - do not own the offi culties of a native deputy collector,
ces, 48 — their voice not the voice of 455, Note.
God, 106 — may be foolish, ignorant, Reed,' Luman, the liberal patron of
and vicious, 107 — must give up a American art, 319.
portion of their freedom, 108. Renard, ambassador of Charles V. to
Philip, II., negotiations for the marriage Mary Tudor, 507 — instructions to,

of, with Mary Tudor, 509 - proposed 508 — admitted to an audience, 509 —
Portuguese match for, 516 - accepted secrecy of his proceedings, 510
by Mary, 518 — failure of his expect his account of a conversation with
ations, 521.

Mary, 513 – treats the English peo-
Pitt, William, first speech of, 393 — re ple as enemies, 520.

fuses to succeed Lord Shelburne, 402. Resurrection of the dead, proof of the, 65
Plowden, Sir Edmund, founds an order -human life otherwise incomplete

of knighthood in New Jersey, 275 - and fragmentary, 66 — death of the
gives titles to his own family, 276, affections is improbable, 67 - not
Note.

untrue because inconceivable, 69.
Poetry, Recent English, reviewed, 1 – Reveller, The Strayed, a poem, reviewed,

should come nearer to life and realities, 1, 20.
3-discrepant theories in, 21 — Nature Revolution, American, Correspondence of
improperly deified in, 22.

the, reviewed, 80— principal actors in
Political Philosophy, by Lord Brougham, the, 82

reviewed, 31 -- importance of pub- Rogers, Henry, Eclipse of Faith by, re-
lic opinion in, 34 - knowledge not the viewed, 60 — uses ridicule freely, 62

- assails the Newman and Parker – religious enthusiasm of, 163 - dy:
school, 70 - on book-revelation, 73 ing days of, 164-contrasted with Mrs.

- on the alleged mixture of truth and Ware, 165 - devotional fervor of, 167.
error in the Bible, 77.

Seven-Years War,consequences of the,388.
Roorkhi, a town in India, canal works in, Shedd, Prof., on B. B. Edwards as a
457.

teacher, 228.
Roxbury, plain dealing with a petition Shelburne, Lord, conduct of, in negotiat-
from, 363.

ing peace with America, 397 - ap-
Russell, Lord John, Memorials of C. J.

pears willing to cede the Canadas, 398
Fox, edited by, reviewed, 373 — small separates from Fox and becomes
success of, as an editor of Tom Moore's Premier, 400 — forced to resign, 401.
life, 374 — fails still more signally Slavery, the possible amelioration of, 466
as an editor of the Fox papers, 375 -- - a subject of deep interest to the
a partisan, who obscures what he can whole world, 468 - especially to Eu-
not illumine, 376 — condemns the ropeans, 469 - of vital importance
Coalition ministry, 408.

here in America, 470 — evils of, not

generally known, 471 - not regulated
Saints, Modern, what constitutes one, by law, 473 — how the system works,

145 -- always recognized, 146 — al 474-importance of the interests affect-
ways a worker, 147 — lives of, should ed by, 475 - a necessity, 478 — one

be written, 148 - account of one, 152. form of servitude, ib. - should not con-
Savage, James, edition of Winthrop's vert human beings into property, 479

History of New England by, reviewed, - may be made a social institution
331 - a learned and faithful editor, regulated by law, 480 — does not con-
332 — his great toil in deciphering the flict with the rights of man, 481 -- may
manuscript, 333 — judges Winthrop exist for the benefit of the negro, 482
and his colleagues rather too harshly, - consequences of not limiting it by
372.

law, 483 — effect of proper laws on,
Say and Seale, Lord, proposes to emi 484 - evils of, as set forth by Mrs.

grate to Massachusetts, 351 - Mr. Stowe, 485 – might assume a new

Cotton's letter in answer to, 352. aspect, 486 — three points established
Schoolcraft, Henry R., on the Indian respecting, 487 - legal means of pre-

Tribes, reviewed, 245 — beauty and venting the atrocities of, 488 — the
costliness of his volumes, ib - heavy presence of Africans the cause of the
appropriations by Congress to pay for evils of, 489 - possible territorial ex-
them, 246 — tells us nothing new, 247 tension of, 490-effects of the fugitive
- brings together a jumble of old and slave law on, 491 - how these effects
worthless matter, 248 — on the geolo might be obviated, 492 — the question
gical action of the great Lakes, 249 — whether immediate abolition of it
prates about palæontology instead of would be a benefit, answered by a
the Indians, 250 - silly account of the Cambridge man, noticed, 528.
Oneida stone by, 251 - his visit to Smith, Alexander, Poems by, reviewed, 1
Dighton rock, 252 - on other Indian - models followed by, 2 — not a con-
inscriptions, 254 — on Indian picto noisseur or a student, 4 — analysis of
graphy, 255 — has given a good job the principal poem of, 5 — criticisms
to engravers, 256 — his materials pre on, 6 - cited, *7 deals too much in
sented without any arrangement, 257 similes, 24 --successful delineation by,
- on Indian legends and myths, 258 25 - brings incongruous things to-
- his mode of gathering statistics, 260 gether, 26 — should study the prose-
- general worthlessness of the work, writers, 27.

261 — shows the abuse of government Smith, R. B., on Irrigation in Italy and
patronage, 262.

India, reviewed, 439 — article in the
Schuyler, General, imperfect justice done Calcutta Review by, 442, note — state-
to, 84.

ments of, 446 -- on the Eastern Jumna
Seton, Mrs. Eliza A., Life of, by C. J. Canal, 450 - on the benefits of the

White, reviewed, 145 - as much a canals, 452, 463 - on the works at
saint as St. Bega, 149 - residence of, Roorkhi, 456.
in Italy, 152 - sufferings of, at Leg- Social Theories, Considerations on some
horn, 153— inclines to Romanism, 155 recent, reviewed, 106 — that of God
- befriended by the Filicchis, 156 - and the People, ib. — of perfect free-
founds a nunnery, 157 — ascetic and dom in the universal republic, 108
self-tormenting practices of, 158 — as of Socialism and coöperation, 113
a teacher, 161 — bereavements of, 162 the prospect before us, 116.

Socialism, refutation of, 113.

Uncle Tom's Cabin reviewed, 466 - en-
Sparks, Jared, Correspondence of the thusiastic reception of, ib. — merits of,
Revolution, edited by, reviewed, 80– 467 -- causes of the success of, 468 –
characteristics of his present work, 'founded on truth, 470 – three points
101- appendixes added by, 103 proved by, 487.

merits of his work, 105.
Spontaneous combustion, in Bleak House,
*429'— Dickens's description of, cited Vane, Henry, why chosen governor so
430— possibility of, denied, 432-sup soon in Massachusetts, 351.
posed phenomena of, 433 -- alleged Viomesnil, Baron de, murder of, 298.
cases of, examined, 434 - of the Count-
ess Baudi, ib. — Lecat's case of, 435
of Bertholi, a friar, ib. - case at Lime- Walker, William S., Poetical Remains
rick, 436 forged case of, at Paris, of, reviewed, 1 - shivering timidity
437 — of Countess de Goerlitz, dis of, 27 – cited, ib.
proved, 438.

Ward, Nathaniel, compiler of the Body
Spotswood, Col. A., order of knighthood of Liberties, 369.
founded by, 273.

Ware, Mary L., Memoir of, by E. B. Hall,
Stowe, Harriet B., Uncle Tom's Cabin reviewed, 145 - spiritual image of,

by, reviewed, 466 - characterized as contrasted with Mrs. Seton's, 165 -
a novelist, 467 — causes of her success, early life of, 166 — religious sentiments
468 — has made known the evils of of, 167 — her visit to England, 169 —

slavery to Southerners themselves, 472. her labors and sacrifices at Osmother-
Strickland, Agnes, Lives of the English ly, 170 — her return and marriage,

Queens by, reviewed, 493 — has re 171 - her married life, 172 - her
versed the popular notions of Mary death, 173.
and Elizabeth' Tudor, 494 - judges Washington, George, Letters of Eminent
Mary leniently, 503.

Men to, edited by Jared Sparks, re-

viewed, 80 - Lafayette's affection for,
Tamerlane, curious passage in the Insti 88 — feelings with which he inspired
tutes of, 443.

others, 102 - on the hard fate of the
Tarsus, description of the city of, 174 — army officers, 278 — his attempts to

a seat of commerce and learning, 175. appease the discontent, 283 - on the
Thackeray, W. M., novels of, reviewed, groundless opposition to the Cincin-

199 - compared with Fielding, 203 - nati, 295.
manly character of, 204 – a very keen Watertown, contest of the people of, with
observer, 205 — his mode of exhibit the magistrates, 359.
ing character, 206 — leaves character Wedderburne, Mr., invective of, against
to be inferred from action, 208 - dis Franklin, 390.
tinctness of his portraits, 209 -- por: White, Rev. Charles J., Life of Mrs. E.
trays childhood admirably, 210 — but A. Seton by, reviewed, 145 — praised
fails to draw women truthfully, 211 – and cited, 159.
makes but two classes of them, 213 — Williams, Roger, not a persecuted man,
his idea of woman's destiny, 214 - a 371.
subjective writer, 216 ---shows his own Winthrop, John, Mr. Savage's edition of
opinions and character, 217 — his large the History of New England by, re-
range of observation, 218 — novels of, viewed, 331 - great value of the work
published in parts, 411 - publishes 332-difficulties of his manuscript, 333
Henry Esmond all at once, 415 — -- his grave and excellent character, 337
sketches from life, 418 — burlesques political sagacity of, 336 — his ac-
the style of Dickens, 423.

tion in the Hingham quarrel, 337 –
Tristram and Iseult, a poem, analyzed and subjected to trial, 338 - acquitted, 339

cited, 13 — faults in, 16 — obscure and - his admirable speech, ib. -- his de-
dreamy, 17 — promises better things, fence of the law excluding strangers
18.

and sectaries, 344 -- why he wished to
Trumbull, Gov. Jonathan, warlike Puri give great power to the magistrates,
tan letter of, 85.

349 — patriotism and disinterestedness
Tudor, royal family, character of the, 494, of, 357 -- unwilling to grant away the
499. See Mary.

legislative power the magistrates,
Tytler, Patrick F. England under Ed 360 — on the right of petition, 363 —
ward VI. and Mary by, reviewed, 493 his reasons for the delay in enacting a
- takes the right view of Mary's cha code of laws, 367.
---er, 503. See Mary.

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