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PAIR OF BLUE EYES, A (continued):
Chap. XIII. “He set in order many Proverbs' .

xiv. “We frolic while 'tis May' . . .
xv. 'A wandering Voice' . .
XVI. “Then Fancy shapes—as Fancy can'
XVII. 'Her Welcome, spoke in faltering Phrase'.

XVIII. «The Mood of Woman who can tell ? .
POEMS:
Abreptus! . . . . . . . .


Angel World .

.
August . . . . . . . . .
Beautiful Names :

XI. Beatrice . .
XII. Gwendoline .
XIII. Madeline . .
XIV. Ethel .

xv. Letitia i
Cold Comfort
Consolation
Cycles of Time, The
Down to the Sea
Imagination . .
Lavinia
Love Song, A . . . . . . .
Love's Dogmatism ..
Loves of the Dawn, The
Mary's Dream . .
Modern Versions of the Classics :

xxv. Proté . . . . .
XXVI. To a Beloved One.
XXVII. The Epithalamium of Helen
xxvIII. The Lesson of the Leaf-fall
xxix. Praises of a Country Life. .

xxx. The Poet's Modest Farewell
One, Two, Three .
Only a Governess! . . . . . .
Parting . . .
Rapture, A .
Rustic Bridge, The ..
St. Martin's Summer.
Truth and Fable
Very Practical Swain, A .
Wasted . . . . . .

. .
Winter .
Richard Wagner and his Theories
Second Mabel, The . . . . . . . .

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LONDON'S HEART.
BY B. L. FARJEON, AUTHOR OF 'GRIF,''JOSHUA MARVEL,' AND

BLADE-O'-GRASS.'

CHAPTER XXI.

LIZZIE TELLS A VERY SIMPLE STORY.

SMILING youth and wasted age stood gazing at each other for a moment. The girl's cheeks were flushed; bright happiness danced in her eyes. She came like a sunbeam into the room; joyous light and life irradiated from her.

She was a picture of neatness and prettiness; she was dressed in a pretty-coloured stuff dress, and a piece of blue ribbon round her neck, to which a locket was attached, gave the slightest suspicion of coquettishness to her appearance. She held a candlestick in her hand, but the candle in it was not lighted. Although she stood still for a brief space, gazing at the old man, her thoughts were not upon him. There was a listening look in her face, and as she raised her hand she murmured, ‘I won der! I wonder!' and said aloud, in soft tones,

May I look out of your window, daddy?'

Muzzy's window looked upon the street. Lizzie, not waiting for

VOL. XI.

permission, went to the window, and looked out, and stood there in silence so long, that Muzzy shuffled to her side. He saw nothing, however, for the form which Lizzie had been watching was out of sight. If she had spoken her thoughts, the words would have been : 'The dear fellow! It does my heart good to see him linger about the house. I used to see that with Mary, and Mary used to watch through the blind.' (Here, to be faithful to her musings, would have come a laugh that was almost a whisper-like a ripple on a lakelike a gurgling stream dancing down a hill.) 'He turned back three times to look at the house. Now, if he had known that I was here, he wouldn't have gone away for a long while. How handsome he is !

A deeper flush was in her cheek, and her eyes sparkled still more brightly, as with a happy sigh she turned from the window to Muzzy, who was standing by her side.

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You got my key, daddy ? she did. With the pleasantest little said.

laugh in the world. “Yes, my dear, thank you.'

Preferring to talk in the dark,' 'Did you come home early ? he suggested, in a singular tone of "At about ten o'clock, my dear.' discontent.

Did you see any one? Did ‘Yes; perhaps — Some One — anybody ask for me?

does.' "Nobody asked of me, Liz. You Again the pleasant little laugh. expected somebody, then?"

That, which was like music, and O, no; but I wish I had been her joyous happy manner, and her at home.'

clear voice and pretty ways, made She dismissed the subject with a home of the otherwise lonely a light shake of the head, and said, room. smiling,

“We have been to the theatre “You've had company, daddy.' to-night,' she said ; 'Some One and

“Yes, my dear,' he replied, with me. I should like to be an actress. a wistful look at her pretty face- I think I should have made a good a strangely jealous look, too, which one.' seemed to imply that he would have She let her hair fall loose as she been better pleased if she were a spoke, and put on an arch look little less bright.

to provoke a favourable verdict. “Nice company ?' she asked. Muzzy's hitherto dull mood bright

A gentleman — one who has ened under her influence. been kind to me.'

'What theatre did you go to, my She nodded with conscious grace, dear ? and stood before the old man with “To the Olympic. We saw an assertion of prettiness upon her Daisy Farm. Isn't it a pretty which heightened the contrast be- name? Now, one would fancy tween her graceful person and his that everybody was happy at Daisy unattractive form. Not that the Farm, because of the name : but contrast was in her mind ; she did it wasn't so. They were all in not think of it, but it would have trouble until the end of the play, been forced upon an observer. and then something very unex

We heard you talking,' she pected happened, and everything said.

came right. Is it so in real life?' 'You have had company also, I don't think so.' Lizzie.

‘But it's nice in a play. I wonO, yes.' With a blush and a der how ever they can cram such smile.

a lot of things in a couple of hours; "We heard you talking, my dear.' and it all seems so natural! There

I suppose we made a great was one part that Some One didn't noise; Some One talks very loud like; it was where a young man sometimes.'

who had been doing wrong-steal‘You did not make a noise, mying money from his master-robdear, but we heard you. Lizzie,' he bed his own father (as we all said, as if the thought had just oc- thought he was), so that he could curred to him, your candle was put the money back. Some One out when you came in.'

got regularly excited over it; but 'It went out in the passage, it turned out that the man he daddy.

robbed wasn't his father, so that Or some one blew it out, Liz was all right. When that was zie.'

shown and the young man got off, “Yes; perhaps — Some One Some One clapped so, that everybody looked at him. He lost his She ran out of the room, and sweetheart, though.'

returned with a large bunch of "Who?"

flowers, fresh and fragrant like her“The young man in the play. self. As we were walking home, I said 'Are they not beautiful ? Am I to Some One, “Supposing that was not a lucky girl ? Just think! you, would you have liked to lose Two presents of flowers in one your sweetheart in that way?" He night! turned quite white at the idea, and ‘Mine is a poor one, Lizzie,' he he looked at me so strangely, and said. said, “But you wouldn't throw me “It is very pretty, and I shall off as that heartless girl did in the put it in water all by itself.'. play, would you, Lizzie?” I said, She selected a flower from the “No; that I wouldn't.” “Not even bunch, and placed it in her bosom if I was as bad as that young fel- by the side of the other; then bent low ?" asked Some One, to try me. down until her lips touched it. And then I said — But you can "You are fond of flowers, my guess what I said, daddy. I don't dear.' think I'm a changeable girl, like “I love everything that is bright. some. We were very happy after- I like to bury my face in them, like wards, Some One and me.'

this, and shut my eyes, and think. Come and sit down, Lizzie,' Such beautiful thoughts come ! said Muzzy; ‘I want to talk to Suiting the action to the word, you.'

she buried her face in the flowers, The girl obeyed, and as Muzzy and saw pictures of the future as did not immediately speak, she fell she wished it to be. It was filled a-musing. Sweet thoughts were with sweet promise, as it nearly alhers evidently, for presently the ways is to youth. And if fulfilment laugh that was like music came never comes, the dreams bring hapfrom her, evoked by something piness for the time. pleasant that she had seen or heard “Try! she said, raising her face in her fancies. The sound aroused and holding out the flowers to him. her, and looking up she saw Muzzy To please her, he closed his holding out the flower he had eyes among the leaves. But the brought home for her.

visions that came to his inner sense For you, Liz."

of sight were different from those O, thank you, dad.'

she had seen. For her the future. She held it up by the side of For him the past. The clouds her hair to admire it, and asked through which he looked were dark how it looked there. Out of his and sombre, and asglimpses oflongfull-hearted admiration of her pretty forgotten times flashed through the ways he had but one answer, of clouds, he sighed as one might have course. Then she placed it in the sighed who, wandering for a genebosom of her dress, which was ration through a strange country slightly open at the throat, and as filled with discordant and feverish the leaves touched her fair skin, circumstance, finds himself sudshe looked down and smiled both denly in a place where all is hushed, on the flower and herself.

and where the soft breeze brings Some One would be jealous,' to him the restful sound of sweet she said, “if he saw it there; espe- familiar bells. But the dark clouds cially after what he brought me soon rolled over these memories, to-night. Wait a minute ; I'll blotting them out. show you.'

Lizzie,' he said, 'suppose you

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