A Candid Examination of Theism

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K. Paul, Trench, Trübner, 1878 - 197 Seiten
 

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Seite 51 - Hitherto shalt thou come, but no further: and here shall thy proud waves be stayed?
Seite 151 - None of the processes of nature, since the time when nature began, have produced the slightest difference in the properties of any molecule. We are therefore unable to ascribe either the existence of the molecules or the identity of their properties to the operation of any of the causes which we call natural.
Seite 117 - For it is as impossible to conceive that ever bare incogitative matter should produce a thinking intelligent being as that nothing should of itself produce matter. Let us suppose any parcel of matter eternal, great or small, we shall find it, in itself, able to produce nothing. For example, let us suppose the matter of the next pebble we meet with eternal, closely united, and the parts firmly...
Seite 115 - We have the ideas of matter and thinking, but possibly shall never be able to know, whether any mere material being thinks, or no...
Seite 40 - I speak not of the origin of the laws themselves ; but such laws being fixed, the construction in both cases is adapted to them. For instance; these laws require, in order to produce the same effect, that the rays of light, in passing from water into the eye, should be refracted by a more convex surface than when it passes out of air into the eye. Accordingly we find that the eye of a fish, in that part of it called the crystalline lens, is much rounder than the eye of terrestrial animals. What plainer...
Seite 11 - There was a time, then, when there was no knowing being, and when knowledge began to be ; or else there has been also a knowing Being from eternity. If it be said, " There was a time when no being had any knowledge, when that Eternal Being was void of all understanding ; " I reply, that then it was impossible there should ever have been any knowledge...
Seite 4 - ... of seeing what he sees, feeling what he feels, nay, that we actually do so, and when the utmost effort of which we are capable fails to make us aware of what we are told we perceive, this supposed universal faculty of intuition is but " The dark lantern of the Spirit Which none see by but those who bear it...
Seite 29 - ... receiving praise from a father, we certainly have within us the image of some person, to whom our love and veneration look, in whose smile we find our happiness, for whom we yearn, towards whom we direct our pleadings, in whose anger we are troubled and waste away. These feelings in us are such as require for their exciting cause an intelligent being...

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