Literature and the Politics of Family in Seventeenth-Century England

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Cambridge University Press, 25.01.2007
A common literary language linked royal absolutism to radical religion and republicanism in seventeenth-century England. Authors from both sides of the Civil Wars, including Milton, Hobbes, Margaret Cavendish, and the Quakers, adapted the analogy between family and state to support radically different visions of political community. They used family metaphors to debate the limits of political authority, rethink gender roles, and imagine community in a period of social and political upheaval. While critical attention has focused on how the common analogy linking father and king, family and state, bolstered royal and paternal claims to authority and obedience, its meaning was in fact intensely contested. In this wide-ranging study, Su Fang Ng analyses the language and metaphors used to describe the relationship between politics and the family in both literary and political writings and offers a fresh perspective on how seventeenth-century literature reflected as well as influenced political thought.
 

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Fatherkings and Amazon queens
21
amazon queens
34
interpreting subjects
45
Miltons band ofbrothers
49
hereditary principle did not determine succession the antiprelatical tracts
53
republican liberty
58
Hobbes and the absentfamily
76
metropolis Colonies that remain dependent are merely provinces But if
81
civil authority is superior to religious authority Since the English
96
John of Salisbury in Policraticus 1159 The earliest extended exposition
97
description of an Eternall Life resembling that which we lost
99
Cromwellian fatherhood and its discontents
103
family politics in
143
the divine family circle
145
Titan Heavns first born
147
Margaret Cavendishs
169

of succession in monarchy as he has discussed it in
83
from family analogy to body politic
85
peoples religious practice is not something they owe to God
89
nature the Art whereby God hath made and governes the
91
one Assembly of men that may reduce all their Wills
94
the civil state of christian community
95
the monarchs two bodies
186
By highlighting the power of queens and aristocratic wives despite
192
Marriage and discipline in early Quakerism
195
family and marriage
201
gender and schism
211
community can break down when money is involved and when
217

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Seite 11 - ... a Liberty to Tender Consciences and that no man shall be disquieted or called in question for differences of opinion in matters of religion which do not disturb the peace of the kingdom...

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