Descriptive Catalogue of the Woods Commonly Employed in this Country for the Mechanical and Ornamental Arts

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Holtzapffel & Company, 1843 - 120 Seiten
 

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Seite 105 - It is imported in trimmed logs from 3 to 8 and rarely 14 in. diam., the wood is in general softer than boxwood, and easy to cut. It is used for parts of cabinets, necklaces, ornaments, fans, &.c. The bark of the sandal-wood gives a most beautiful red or light claret-coloured dye, but it fades almost immediately when used as a simple infusion ; in the hands of the experienced dyer it might, it is supposed, be very useful. There are woods described in the French works as red sandal-woods, and one specimen...
Seite 46 - Streaker may be used either by itself or in aid of carving ; and depends on the fact, that if a depression be made by a blunt instrument on the surface of the wood, such depressed part will again rise to its original level by subsequent immersion in water.
Seite 92 - Mahogany, (Swielenia senegalensis,) from Gambia, is a more recent importation ; it twists much more than either of the above, and is decidedly inferior to them in all respects except hardness. It is a good wood for mangles, curriers...
Seite 106 - Surinam, and along the banks of the Orinoko, for the bows of the Indians. The colour of the wood is red hazle, with numerous black spots and marks, which have been tortured into the resemblance of letters, or of the scales of the reptile ; when fine it is very beautiful, but it is scarce in England, and chiefly used for walking-sticks, which are expensive ; the pieces, that are from 2 to 6 in.
Seite 117 - July 1 1th, 1838, two years before Dr. Boucherie's was mentioned in Paris, which was in June, 1840.* The specification filed by Mr. Bethell stated, " that trees just cut down may be rapidly impregnated with the solution of the first class, hereafter mentioned, (among which is included the pyrolignite of iron,) by merely placing the...
Seite 99 - Islands ; it is sent in large planks, or in round and square logs, called from their tints red, brown, and black, and also sweet partridge ; the wood is close, heavy, and generally straight in the grain. The colours are variously mingled, and most frequently disposed in fine...
Seite 91 - Mahogang is a native of the West Indies and the country round the Bay of Honduras. It is said to be of rapid growth, and so large that its trunk often exceeds 40 feet in length and 6 feet in diameter.
Seite 107 - Its mean size is 32 ft. high ; is a very clean wood, with a figure like the plane-tree, but much smaller ; it is softer than beech, but rather disposed to brittleness. The colour of young sycamore is silky white, and of the old brownish white ; the wood of middle age is intermediate in colour, and the strongest : some of the pieces are very handsomely mottled. It is used in furniture, pianofortes and harps, and for the superior kinds of Tunbridge turnery ; it may be cut into very good screws, and...
Seite 87 - It is softer than holly, but is preferable to it for large painted and varnished works, on account of its greatly superior size. • HORSE-FLESH WOOD, one of the Mangroves, which see. INDIAN BLACK-WOOD. See EAST INDIAN BLACK-WOOD. IRON-WOOD, is imported from the Brazils, the East and West Indies, and other countries, in square and round logs, 6 to 9 in. and upwards through. Its colours are very dark browns and reds, sometimes streaked, and generally straight grained.
Seite 104 - B;ihia and Rio Janeiro, called also Jacaranda, is so named according to Prince Maximilian, as quoted by Dr. Lindley, because when fresh it has a faint but agreeable smell of roses, and is produced by a Mimosa in the forests of Brazil. Mr. G. Loddiges informs me it is the Mimosa Jacaranda. The rosewood, or...

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