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THE N: W YOK
PUBLIC LIBRARY

146520

ASTOR, LENOX AND
TILDEN' FOUNDATIONS

1903

LONDON: WERTHEIMER, LEA AND CO., PRINTERS,

CIRCUS PLACE, LONDON WALL.

INDEX.-1896-1897.

on, 48

Admiralty Waste and Jobbery, 22 Bentham, Jeremy, 222, 237, 239, Conquered, The," 334

German Battle by Tariff, 65
Advocate of Peace, 26, 102

247, 271, 276, 291, 299, 306 Consul, Incidents in Life of a, 171 German Consuls Compared, 26
Africa, South, 83, 163, 202, 243, Beresford, Lord Charles, M.P., 133, Cost of Sport 131

German Emperor, 189, 203, 217,
298, 327, 335

150
Costa Rica Packet Arbitration,

299, 311
African Annexation, 34, 58, 135 Berry, Dr. C. A., 310, 331

217

German Military Officers, 157
African Wars, 111, 162
Besant, Sir Walter, 111
Courtney, Mr., 39, 200

German Peace Correspondent, 47
American Feeling towards Eng. Birmingham Auxiliary, 12, 24, 38 Cremer, Mr. W. R., 56, 246, 257 Germans, As the, See Us, 130
land, 1, 25, 119, 172

55, 67, 115, 151, 176, 199, 212, Cretan Question, 231, 234, 310 Gill, John, 8, 100, 110, 160, 212,
American Peace Society, 117 224, 240, 272, 281, 296, 308, 323, Crimean War, Origin of, 102

272, 323
American School Histories, 118 336

Crimean War, a Comparison, 158 Gladstone, Mr. W. E., 2, 117, 141,
Anglo-American Arbitration, 14, Bishops and Arbitration, 286, 303 CURRENT NOTES, 1, 13, 25, 41, 57, 158,
24, 25, 37, 42, 56, 59, 60, 69, 70, Bishops and Militarism, 210

69, 85, 101, 117, 133, 149, 161, Glasgow Peace Society, 31, 55, 132
83, 101, 105, 113, 117, 134, 150, Bloated Armaments, 273

177, 189, 201, 213, 225, 241, 257, Great Britain and the U.S.A., 58
157, 175, 177, 179, 190, 191, 196, Bolivia, 167

273, 285, 297, 309, 325

Greco-Turkish War, 226, 227, 229,
197, 198, 202, 209, 222, 226, 242, Boys' Brigades, 23, 66, 147, 171,

235, 241, 298, 300
* 262, 274, 297, 310
298, 311

Greeks, Kindness of Ancient, 148
Anglo-American Peace Demon. Boys' Lifeguards Brigade, 329

Guatemala in 1896, 64
stration, 41, 51
Brigades, Church Lads', 275
Danish Peace Society, 109

Guns at Elswick, 40
Anglo-Turkish War, An, 153 Brainerd, Mr. Cephas, 262

Darby, Dr. W. E., Meetings and Guns made of Paper, 174
Anglo-Venezuelan Treaty, 193 Bright, John, 200

Journeys, 5, 22, 24, 26, 29, 41,
201, 226, 259, 285, 310
Bright, Wm. Leatham, 42, 135

167, 188, 209, 220, 232
Appeal to the Nations, 304 British Acquisitions in Recent Darby, Dr. W. E., Visits to Paris,
Arbitration Alliance, Annual Years, 134

213, 225, 237
Meeting (1896), 57, 69, 89, 96 British Feeling towards America, Darby, Dr. W. E., Letters of, 145 Hamilton, Lord George, M.P., 133
Arbitration Alliance,

Harrison, Frederick, 16
Annual
1, 24

231, 213
Meeting (1897), 225, 257, 267, British Business Abroad, 175

Dardanelles, Passage of, 144

Hawaii, Annexation of, 260
308

Hay, Col. John, 214
Budget, Naval, 41, 44

Defence, True, 331
Arbitration, Appeal by Cardinals,

Denmark, King of, 325

Hazell, Mr. W., M.P., 47
60

HERALD OF PEACE, 101, 161, 178

Dickens, Charles, in America, 174
Arbitration, International, 16, 21,

Disarmament, General Effect of,

174
36, 39, 54, 117, 179, 184, 259, 310
Arbitration, Canadian Premier Campbell, Dr. W. A., 36
Cambridge, Letter from, 36 Doane, Bishop of, on War Folly,

25

India, An Example, 215
Canada, 59, 64
Arbitration, Fred. Harrison on, 16 Canadian Premier op Arbitration, Drummond Castle, Wreck of, 86, Indian Policy, 303, 305

Droz, Numa, 259

India and the Soudan, 101
Arbitration, French Ambassador

48

95

International Law Congress, 147
on, 36
Arbitration, Limits of, 184
Canevaro, Admiral, 326
Dufferin, Marquis of, 85

Ireland, Recent Statistics, 132
Arbitration in 1870, 56
Celebration, International, 193 Dutch Peace Society, 38

Italian War Misery, 127
Chamberlain, Mr., 58, 66
Arbitrations :

Duels, Curious, 128
Chambers of Commerce, 68, 86, 98 Dukhobortsi. The, 282
Alaska Boundary, 201
Behring Sea, 13, 38, 59, 86, China, Letter by Bishop of Mid,
Chili and Argentina, 71, 103 Durham, Bishop of, 13, 215, 235

Jameson, Dr., 43, 134
151, 201, 226, 259, 297, 310
305

Japanese Armaments, 282
Costa Rica Packet, 217
Christ the Victor, 173

Jews, Appeal to, 106
Delagoa Bay, 103, 201, 225
France and Brazil, 15
Christian Victory over Indians, Eastern Crisis, 225, 228

Jingoism, 2, 24. 58, 208
114
Great Britain and Belgium, Christianity and Sectarianism,

Ecclesiastical Patronage of Mili. Johannesburg, Plea from, 244, 254
tarism, 26

Journalists, Pacific, 14
285

148
Great Britain and Colombia, Christmas Pastimes, 332

Edwards, Mr. Passmore, 178 Jubilee Celebration, 258, 281
Egypt, 43, 162, 178

Jubilee of the L. & N. W. R., 116
118, 201, 259
Great Britain and Germany,

Churches, International Petition, England and India, 305

45, 191, 237, 257, 284, 308, 333 European Concert, 226, 227, 228,
225

Clarke, M.P., Sir Edward, 16, 156 326, 327
Armenia, 2, 14, 42, 133, 145, 149, Cleveland, President, 1, 2, 9, 10, 25, Evolution and War, 277

Kafirs, The, 56, 215
151, 159
27, 61, 69, 128, 177, 190

Kruger, President, 85
Army, Increase of, 178, 179, 206 Conference, Inter-parliamentary
Army in India, 42, 47, 65, 214, 216

(Buda-Pestl), 134, 152
Assassination of Spanish Premier, Conference (Brussels), 213, 263 Faure, President, 187, 207, 225,
287
285, 287

237, 286, 298

Labouchere, Mr., M.P., 21, 27, 45,
Association, I. A. and P. A., 257
Conference, Origin of, 136

Fire Brigade of Women, A, 148
Australia, Letter from, 229

57, 59, 98, 133, 161, 162
Congregational Union and Peace, Fleet, Cost of the, 281

Labour Disputes, Earl Grey on, 15
Auxiliary Societies, 12, 38, 55, 6 67,

52. 84

Foreign Labour Competition, 23
160, 240, 272, 323

Congress, Free Church, 41, 45 FOREIGN NOTES, 7, 19, 33, 19, LEADING ARTICLES.
Congress, Buda-Pesth Peace, 44, 93, 109, 125, 142, 155, 169, 183, The Monroe Doctrine and Vene-

101, 110, 117, 124, 134, 136, 141, 195, 207, 219, 233, 265, 279, zuela, 6
Baby among the Slain, 131

143, 157
303, 317, 331

The Press and Patriotism, 18
Balfour, M.P., Mr. A. J., 39 Congress, Hamburg Peace, 213, France and England, Trade be- National Defence by Moral
Bayard, Mr., 11, 200, 208, 214, 274 236, 260, 273, 285, 292, 304

tween, 71

Force, 32
Bellicose Bishops, 36

Conscription, 3, 20, 43, 179, 198, French Invasion of 1797, 333 Italian and British Jingoism, 48
Bellicose Clericals, 150

211, 258, 296, 307
French Peace Society, 68

The Chorus for Arbitration, 62

LEADING ARTICLES.
Newfoundland, 53
Peckover, Miss P. H., 200

Socialist Demonstration, 102
Arthur O'Neill, 76

New York Journals, 2, 31, 52 Pennsylvania Peace Union, 15, 26, Socialist Congress on Armies, 102
The Education of the Young in New York Legislature, 42

112

Socialism and Anarchy in America,
Pacific Sentiments, 92
Nobel's Bequest, 190, 208
Pension List, American, 299

187
Socialists versus War, 108

Society of Friends, 26, 100, 258
The Debt of Christendom to

POETRY :-

Societies, New, 257, 297
Africa, 124

England's Message to America, Soudan Expedition, 41, 46, 50, 70,
The Armenian Crisis and the OBITUARIES :-

23

86, 92, 286
Peace Society, 140
Corner, Mrs. W. E., 243

A Utopia, 34

South Australia, 15, 70
Lord Rosebery's Peace Speech, Gill, Thomas, 284

The Armed Peace, 37

Southall, Miss Gertrude, 212
15+
Green, Mr. B. L., 20, 37

The Hatred of England, 47

Spanish Misery through War, 126
The Venezuela Settlement, 168 Hornby, Sir Edward, 197

Birds' Wings in Church, 65 Speaker, The, on the New Jingo-
World-Wide Peace Progress, 182 Palmer, Mr. George, 301,

To the French Islanders of ism, 100
The Anglo-American Treaty, Pease, Mr. H. J., M.P., 199

Molene, 95

Stage in Peace Movement, 191
194
Pitman, Sir Isaac, 201

The Adopted. 105

Stead, Mr. W. T., 86, 227
Now the Army, 206
Wigham, Mr. Henry, 329

Mr. “Punch's” Plea for the Stundists, Creed of the, 129
The European Concert, 218

Birds, 114

Survey, A, 328
The War Fever, 232

The War Spirit, 116

Suttner, Baroness V., 257
The Diamond Jubilee Celebra.

A Kindly Word, 132

Swedish Jubilee, 299
tion, 248
Pan-American Congress, Results Peace, not a Sword, 198

Swiss Army, The, 113
The Jubilee Celebration, 264
of, 159

To England and America !
Are We a Civilized Nation ? 278 Pan-Anglican Synod of 1897, 117, Greeting ! 199
Splendid Isolation, 290
303

All men are equal, 231
The Revival of Anglo-American Paris Press and Militarism, 87

If ! 306

Taylor, Rev. J. H., Letter to
Arbitration, 302
Paris Fire, Terrible, 243

Political Asylum, British, 287 Missionaries, 27, 50
Conscription, 316

Parker, Dr., and the Jubilee, 281 Pope, Letter to Daily Chronicle, Telegraph Boys, 257, 334
Actual British Conscription, 330 Parry, Rev. J. R., 323

61

“ These Anxious Times," 60
Leeds Peace Association, 199 Partisanship, 214

Port Royal Pastor, 307

Thomas, Dr. Reuen, on Arbitra-
Letters from Secretaries, 35, 173 Passive Resistance (Dr. A.Wallace), Portugal in Africa, 61

tion, 13
Liberal Party and Panic Expendi- 135, 286

Primitive Methodists, 35

Times," on Unwise Counsels,
ture, 211
Pax Britannica, 286
Prince of Wales, 2, 103

150
Liberty, Equality and Fraternity, “Peace and the Peace Society,” Professional Alarmists, 162 Trade, Relation of Armaments to,
238

221
Pulitzer, Deputation to Mr., 85, 87

112
Lincoln, President, 146, 153, 296 Peace with Honour, 266

Trafalgar Day, 309
Library, Our, 324, 336
Peace Brigades, 68

Transveal, 13, 26, 243, 255, 274,
Liverpool Peace Society, 16, 24, 38, Peace Day, 197, 203

285
55, 56, 71, 160, 176, 199, 212, Peace Essay for Schools, 112 Quarrelsome Neighbour, How to Tribunal, An Inter-State, 187
223, 324, 336
Peace, Jingoes, 162

deal with a, 188

Tugwell, Bishop, on Africa, 311
Loans, Britain's, 274

Peace Presentations, 258, 274, 310, Queen, Friends' Address to the, Tunis, Agreement in Regard to,
Lodge Bill, The Infamous, 112 325

273

322
Lord Chief Justice's Visit to Peace Society, Address to German Queen chosen Arbitrator, 27

Turning the Other Cheek, 260,
U.S.A., 86, 117, 119, 151

People, 280
Queen, Gift to the, 273

276
Love, Mr. A. H., 69, 147, 150, 175, PEACE SOCIETY, Annual Meeting, Queen, Letter to the, 263
255

(1896), 57, 69

Queen and President Steyn, 286
Lucknow, Siege of, 39

PEACE SOCIETY, Annual Mem- Queen's Permission, 297
bers' Meeting (1896), 71 Queen's Speech, 25, 191, 197, 286

Venezuela, 2, 16, 25, 26, 35, 37, 42,
PEACE SOCIETY. Annual Public

54, 57, 68, 85, 111, 156, 161, 162,
Meeting (1896), 77

177, 193, 213, 274
McKinley, President, 177, 222 PEACE SOCIETY, ANNUAL REPORT

Verestchagin, The Painter, 217
Madagascar, French in, 260

(1896), 72, 81

Red Man in America, 287
Manchester Auxiliary, 41, 55, 67, PEACE SOCIETY, Annual Meeting Religious Tract Society, 43
80, 115, 149, 181, 212, 224, 240, (1897), 225, 241

Resolutions, Various, 15, 36, 37,
272, 281, 296, 308, 336
PEACE SOCIETY, Annual Mem. 38, 41, 76, 113, 126

Walcott, Senator, Friendly Speech,
Manica Arbitration, 201, 274, 285 bers' Meeting (1897), 244

Reviews and Notices of Books, 5, 15
Matabele, The, 66, 229
PEACE SOCIETY, Annual Public 236, 308, 324

War, 129, 238, 239, 287, 307
Memorials, Presentation of, 333 Meeting (1897), 245

Rosebery, Lord, 11, 136, 149 War, A Protest Against, 224
Militarism, Austrian, 180

PEACE SOCIETY, ANNUAL REPORT Rowntree, Mr. Joshua, 186 War, About the Cost of, 333
Militarism in Religion, 118

(1897), 249
Ruskin Family, The, 221

War-Agitators, Ignorance of, 146
“ Military Craze" in America, 156 PEACE SOCIETY, Autumnal Meet- Russell, Mr., 212, 240, 308

War with China, What it Cost
Military Service and Priests, 5 ing (1896), 136, 161, 163

Japan, 114
Missionaries and Peace, 17
PEACE SOCIETY, Autumnal Meet-

War and Drink, 55
Mohonk Conference, 54, 262
ing, 1897, 297, 309, 312, 318

War, Loss of Horses in, 128
Moltke, Von, 307

PEACE SOCIETY, 2, 3, 7, 24, 26, 41, Salisbury, Lord, 43, 99, 104, 117, War, More Deadly, 209
Monroe Doctrine, 1, 2, 11, 13

145, 309, 325

198, 241, 325, 326

War, Privateering and Contra-
Morley, Mr. John, M.P., 27, 84, 98, PEACE SOCIETIES, English and Schreiner, Olive, 202

band, 53
127

American, 160, 163

Senate, Vote in American, 242 War, The Dogs of, 283
Moscheles, Mr. F., 54, 197
PEACE SUNDAY, 3, 14, 17, 144, 149. | Sermon Notes, 151

War, The Drain of, 261
162, 170, 177, 179, 189, 199, 309, Sherman, Senator, 202

War, What It Means, 237
325

SHORT ARTICLES, 20, 46, 47, 59, Wars, Cost of U. S. Indian, 40
Peace Treaty, Text of, 300

66, 67, 99, 103, 112, 129, 133, 146, Wars in Victoria's Reign, 136
National Debt, Reduction of, 53, Peace Union, Ladies', 46, 69, 94, 147, 148, 160, 167, 168, 172, 173, Watson, Dr. Spence, 178
58, 135, 159
118

174, 175, 176, 188, 217, 227, 239, Welsh Peace Meeting, 211
National Union of Teachers, 59 Pease, Sir J. W., Bart., M.P., 14, 279, 287, 291, 295, 296, 308, 335 Westlake, Professor, 27
Navies of the Great Powers (1896), 43, 66, 258

Siam, England and France, 39 Wisbech L. P. Association, 187
113

Pease, Mr. Arthur, M.P. 257 Sinclair, Archdeacon, on Peace, Wolseley, General Lord, 27, 43, 70,
Navy League, 309
Pease, Mr. A. E., M.P., 201, 241 214

102, 213, 306

AYD

THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY 146520

INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION.

ASTON, LENOX AND TILDEN FOUNDATION.

1000.

"Put up thy sword into his place : for all they who take the sword shall perish with the sword.”—MATT, xxvi. 52. “They shall beat their swords into ploughshares and their spears into pruning-hooks : nation shall not lift up sword against nation,

neither shall they learn war any more.”-ISAIAH ii. 4.

No. 557.

NEW SERIES.

JANUARY 1ST, 1896.

[PRICE 1d.

THE FRIENDS OF PEACE.
CURRENT NOTES.

The friends of Peace, on both sides of the Atlantic, will heartily unite their efforts and their prayers in

behalf of amicable relations between Great Britain and PRESIDENT CLEVELAND'S MESSAGE.

the United States. In former years, when there was Universal surprise and regret have been felt in

some danger of war, most valuable assistance in the this country, at the nature and tone of President

direction of Peace was rendered by the collateral action Cleveland's message to the American Senate, in refer

of many good men and women in each of the two ence to the Venezuela dispute. Hitherto Mr. Cleveland

countries concerned. And during the next few months, has been regarded as one of the wisest and most pacific

there may be much need for similar fraternal efforts of American statesmen. But in this instance he appears

towards a common object. to have been strangely led astray ; for he not only manifests ignorance of the actual circumstances of the

THE BLIND CHAPLAIN OF U.S. SENATE. dispute between England and Venezuela, but his Just after the issue of President Cleveland's message, message is lamentably lacking in that calm and con- the Rev. William Melburn, the blind chaplain of the ciliatory spirit which characterises Lord Salisbury's Senate, in opening the proceedings of that House,

, despatches to the American Government on the

referred to the horrors of war, and made an invocaVenezuela question.

tion against the shedding of blood by the two

great English-speaking peoples. His prayer, which AMERICAN FEELING TOWARDS ENGLAND.

was received with the deepest attention, continued as

follows :—" Grant, we beseech Thee, that we may be Notwithstanding the unfortunate circumstance that

saved from imbruing our hands in each others' blood. President Cleveland's defiant message was received with Let the spirit of justice and magnanimity prevail among loud applause and clapping of hands by both parties in the rulers of both nations and among the kindred the American Senate, and that it elicited wild expres- people of the two lands."

On the motion of Mr. sions of delight on the part of the Jingo and Irish Mitchell, the Senate directed that the invocation be sections of the population of the United States, there inscribed in full on the record—an unusual mark of are, happily, many indications that the more thoughtful respect. The chaplain received the congratulations and and intelligent portion of the people are profoundly thanks of many of the Senators. The excellent example averse to the idea of a war with Great Britain. Such a

thus set cannot but have influenced, in the direction of war would be one of the most frightful conflicts in history, and especially wicked and criminal if permitted

peace, very many other Ministers of the Gospel on

both sides of the Atlantic.
to arise out of such a petty ground of dispute as that
furnished by the difficulties in Venezuela.

OPINIONS OF UNITED STATES JURISTS.
BRITISH FEELING TOWARD AMERICA.

The opinions of legal authorities, on the Continent of

Europe and even in the United States, are mostly adIt has been very gratifying to observe, in the journals verse to the President's view. Professor Beale, of the of every party in Great Britain, an absence of hasty anger Harvard Law School, Instructor in International Law, at the American threats of war, and a sense of deep declares that in no sense can the Monroe doctrine be sorrow that the Government of a sister nation, one so held part of international law. Professor Thayer, of closely connected with ourselves by the ties of lineage and the same school, is surprised by the President's allusion race, should have so easily forgotten the claims of those to war, and thinks that the Message will give aid and relations, to say nothing of national dignity and Chris- comfort to the Jingoes. The Evening Post has collected tian responsibility. Englishmen generally are astounded a number of interesting opinions from eminent authoat President Cleveland's bellicose threats, and can rities, inclnding Professor Hyde, of Bowdoin College, scarcely believe that he was not actuated by electoral and Professor Woolsey, who holds the Chair of Interand private influences in this matter.

national Law in the Yale Law School. Both oppose the

President. Professor Woolsey says that the President announces himself as a mediator, but is not. Having been appealed to by only one of the parties to the dispute, he yet proposes to enforce a decision. He is, therefore, not a mediator, but a dictator.

of American heroism are in demand, and patriotism, which we used to say was missing, has bounded into strength and activity, in proportion as our new navy has been swelled by more vessels, and vessels of more and more formidable types.”

AN EX U.S. AMBASSADOR.

CONTINENTAL OPINION. The Hon. Robert Lincoln declares that, while he was The chief journals of the Continent, like those of American Minister to Great Britain, the United States Great Britain, express their astonishment at the extraGovernment asked him to mediate in a boundary ordinary message of President Cleveland, who, hitherto, dispute, but not the one now being discussed, between had enjoyed a European reputation for administrative England and Venezuela. The ex-Minister adds that wisdom. Lord Salisbury offered Arbitration, but Venezuela

THE MONROE DOCTRINE. refused to accept it.

In another column will be found some remarks on THE BOUNDARY COMMISSION.

the Monroe Doctrine, in connection with existing

political relations. It is announced that President Cleveland has appointed the Hon. Robert Lincoln and the Hon. Mr.

A PRACTICAL PROPOSAL. Phelps as two of the Commissioners on the Venezuela

Mr. J. Wrigley, of Kensington, makes the following Boundary. These two gentlemen are held in the greatest respect on both sides of the Atlantic, and their

proposal in reference to the American demands upon

England appointment is a most hopeful circumstance.

“ Before angry words are uttered and written, let an offer be made by this country to the

United States to refer to Arbitration the question THE PRINCE OF WALES.

whether the demands in Mr. Olney's despatch are, or The friendly message cabled to the New York World are not, in accordance with International Law. It might by the Prince of Wales and the Duke of York has been also be conceded that if the decision be against us, no hailed with delight, both in America and in this country. objection shall be raised to the whole Venezuelan It was a most timely and wise service to humanity. boundary question being referred to Arbitration. In

the event of its being in our favour, a settlement with THE “NEW YORK WORLD."

Venezuela would probably, without much difficulty, be This very influential American journal has, during

made. With the known and declared views of the United the recent crisis, taken an admirable part, on the side

States Government on Arbitration, this offer should be of International Peace. It has been splendidly

cordially accepted." patriotic in its defence of the best interests and the true

“FIN DE SIÈCLE IDIOTS.” honour of the United States, whilst having a broad and noble regard to the welfare of the comity of nations.

The Austrian journal, Neue Freie Presse, of Vienna,

says that a war betwen England and the United States MR. GLADSTONE.

would be a piece of hostile folly, and the combatants The New York World received the following

would be fin de siècle idiots. cablegram from Mr. Gladstone in reply to a request

ARMENIA.-CHEAP CRUSADERS. for a statement by him on the situation created by President Cleveland's Message :-" Hawarden.-I The Chancellor of the Exchequer, alluding to the dare not interfere. Only common sense is required. I

reverend and other gentlemen who want to send out cannot say more with advantage.—GLADSTONE.” The other men to die in fighting with the Turks for Times New York correspondent states that this cable

Armenia, remarks :-“There is a kind of crusading gram has completed the conversion of Mr. Chauncey spirit abroad, to some extent, at the present moment-a Depew, and, as the number of Mr. Gladstone's American spirit in which there is a good deal that is noble, at admirers has always been large, it may be expected to

least when those who preach it are willing to go to the convert many others who were not, like Mr. Depew,

crusade themselves. In this matter we must be guided slightly uncertain which way things were going, but

by the dictates of reason and common-sense. We must rampant Jingoes.

consider what it is possible for this country to do. We

must have regard to those risks in the situation which CAUSES OF U.S. JINGOISM.

any one who reads the newspapers can see. When the The New York correspondent of the Pall Mall | path of duty is clear to us, we will not fear to tread it, Gazette remarks :-"What our Southern folk call the but we must tread it by the light and guidance of · blood-thirst' has shown marked signs of a vigorous common-sense, or the remedy applied will be worse revival, to a degree not noticeable since 1861-1865. The

than the disease. word “Jingo' has been transplanted, and applied to a

THE “ TIMES" AND THE PEACE SOCIETY. new party composed of a number of men in both the old parties, and to a great body of influential newspapera.

In another column will be found a letter from Dr. These men and newspapers have been carrying a drawn

Darby, which recently appeared in the Times, in refersword on their shoulders and hunting for a fight, more

ence to the Peace Society and the Armenians. and more plainly. For two years, Napoleonic reminiscence, in the magazines, has given place to a revival of

SUBSTITUTING ONE MASSACRE FOR ANOTHER. interest in George Washington. The national flag is Perhaps the best and briefest condemnation of the now ordered to be displayed on all school-houses ; tales bellicose pro-Armenian agitation which has lately been

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