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THE SECOND LESSON.

Here beginneth the Second Chapter of the Book of Preferment.

I.

NOW these are the generations of those that sought preferment.

II.

Twenty years they sought preferment, and found it not; yea, twenty years they wandered in the wilderness :

III.

Twenty years they sought them places, but they found no resting-place for the soal of the foot.

IV.

And lo! it came to pass in the days of George the king, that they said amongst them

VOL. III.

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selves, "Go to, let us get ourselves places, that it

may be well with us, our wives, and our little

ones."

V.

And these are the names of the men that have gotten themselves places in this their day.

VI.

Now the first that pushed himself forward in this affair was the Motion-maker,* who being swoln with pride and ambition, and thirsting in his heart after the Mammon of unrighteousness, he determined with himself that he would ask for the chancellorship of the Exchequer: but his party wist not what he designed.

VII.

Wherefore he went in privily unto the king's palace, and he got himself placed at the head of the Exchequer, where he sitteth unto this day.

* Samuel Sandys.

VIII.

Who now shall bring in the Place-bill? Who now shall make a motion for removal? Verily, verily, it is much to be feared, that he who expecteth these things from Sandys will be greatly disappointed.

IX.

1.

And Carteret the scribe took the place of Secretary of State, and Harrington * presideth at the Council-board, and Wilmington the President is made First Lord of the Treasury.

X.

In these days Lord Hervey † held the King's Signet, and to him succeeded Lord Gower.

XI.

And the King had a guard, called Gentlemen Pensioners, and over them he set Lord Bathurst.

* The first Lord Harrington.

+ Lord Hervey was Lord Privy Seal.

XII.

Lord Limerick got the Reversion after Lord Palmerston for himself and for his Son after him; and he shall be called the King's remembrancer from generation to generation.

XIII.

Lord Edgcombe was and is not; he was the King's Treasurer in the land of Ireland, but he found no favour in their eyes, and to him succeeded Harry Vane.

XIV.

Henry Leg was scribe to the Treasury, but the name of Leg was unseemly, so he is called Henry Furnese unto this day.

XV.

Moreover it came to pass, that for his great skill in Maritime affairs, Lord Winchelsea was

set at the head of the Admiralty.

XVI.

To Lord Cobham was given the first troop of tall men, called Horse-Grenadiers, and he was likewise made a Field-Marshal.

XVII.

So also was Lord Stair; moreover he was sent Ambassador unto the Dutch, and our credit encreaseth amongst them.

XVIII.

To Lord Sidney Beauclerk succeeded William Finch, as Vice-Chamberlain to the King his brother Edward also was made Groom of the Bedchamber.

XIX.

And that his Majesty might not want good and able Counsellors learned in the Law, lo! Murray the Orator, and Nathaniel Gundry were appointed King's Counsel.

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