The Works, of the Right Honourable Sir Chas. Hanbury Williams ...: From the Originals in the Possession of His Grandson the Right Hon. the Earl of Essex [and Others], Band 3

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Seite 5 - These the fine frame with charming horrors chill, And give the nerves delightfully to thrill. But of all taste the noblest and the best, The first enjoyment of the generous breast, Is to behold in man's obnoxious state Scenes of content, and happy turns of fate. Fair views of nature, shining works of art, Amuse the fancy : but those touch the heart. Chiefly for this proud epic song delights, For this some riot on th1 Arabian Nights. Each case is ours : and for the human mind 'Tis monstrous not to...
Seite 2 - Amongst the daily, weekly, monthly wits. Content if some few friends indulge my name, So slightly am I stung with love of fame, I would not scrawl one hundred idle lines — Not for the praise of all the magazines. Yet once a moon, perhaps, I steal a night; And, if our sire Apollo pleases, write.
Seite 40 - WE complain of Thee, O King, we acknowledge Thee to be an Hanoverian. All Hungary doth worship Thee, the Captain Everlasting. To Thee all Placemen cry aloud, the House of Lords, and all the Courtiers therein. To Thee Carteret and Bath continually do cry, Warlike, warlike, warlike Captain General, of the Armies ! Brunswick and Lunenburgh are full of the brightness of our coin. The venal company of Peers praise Thee. The goodly fellowship of Ministers praise Thee. The noble Army of Hanoverians praise...
Seite 42 - O King, spare thy people of England. And now squeeze thy people of Hanover. Govern them as Thou hast governed us, And confine them to their turnips for ever. Day by day we sing ballads unto Thee. And we bawl against Hanover, ever world without end. Vouchsafe, O King, to keep us this year without thy Hanoverians. The Lord have mercy upon us...
Seite 8 - Twould more indulge my pride to hear it said, That I with you the paths of honour tread, Than that, amongst the proud poetic train, No modern boasted a more classic vein; Or that in numbers I let loose my song, Smooth as the Tweed, and as the Severn strong.
Seite 2 - Yet once a moon, perhaps, I steal a night ; And, if our Sire Apollo pleases, write. You smile; but all the train the Muse that follow, Christians and dunces, still we quote Apollo. Unhappy still our Poets will rehearse To Goths, that stare astonish'd at their verse ; To the rank tribes submit their virgin lays : So gross, so bestial, is the lust of praise ! I to sound judges from the mob appeal, And write to those who most my subject feel. Eumenes, these dry moral lines I trust With you, whom nought...
Seite 4 - Than the dull monarch of a continent. Without this bounty which the gods bestow, Can Fortune make one favourite happy ? — No. As well might Fortune in her frolic vein, Proclaim an oyster sovereign of the main. Without fine nerves, and bosom justly warm'd, An eye, an ear, a fancy, to be charm'd, In vain majestic Wren expands the dome ; Blank as pale stucco Rubens lines the room . Lost are the raptures of bold Handel's strain . Great Tully storms, sweet Virgil sings, in vain. The beauteous forms...
Seite 1 - KIND to my frailties still, Eumenes, hear ; Once more I try the patience of your ear. Not oft I sing: the happier for the town, So stunn'd already they're quite stupid grown With monthly, daily — charming; things I own.
Seite 115 - ll then regard the linnet's note, Or heed the lark's melodious throat ? What pensive lovers then shall dwell With raptures on their Philomel ? The goldfinch shall his plumage hide, The swan abate her stately pride, And Juno's bird no more display His various glories to the sunny day : Then grant thy Suppliant's prayer, And bless my longing ear With notes that I would die to hear...
Seite 5 - With better fortune to surprise a friend ; To cheer the modest Stranger's lonely state ; Or snatch an orphan family from fate ; To do, possess'd with virtue's noblest fire, Such generous deeds as we with tears admire; Deeds that, above Ambition's vulgar aim, Secure an amiable, a solid fame : [seize...