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THE LIFE

OF

SIR JOHN MOORE.

CHAPTER XII.

DOMESTIC OCCURRENCES-CAMP AT SANDGATE, IN KENT-CONFERENCE WITH THE MINISTERS, AND THE RESULT-FERROL.

The return of General Moore, cured of his wound, and preserved from the dangers he had been exposed to, was the greatest consolation possible to his dying father. Doctor Moore was on the verge of old age, and affected with an incurable malady of the heart. He had retired to Richmond, with his wife and only daughter. The arrival of his eldest son, covered with honour, shed a gleam of happiness on his last days, before he descended into the grave.

He was still able to take airings in an open vol. II.

carriage; and to defend himself from the frosts of winter, he always wore that sable pelisse which was the gift of the Grand Vizir to his son. He was tended by his wife, who through life performed her duties to her husband, her children, and her neighbours, with that constant assiduity which is exerted by many in the pursuit of interest and pleasure. She appeared to her family and to her friends to have been created devoid of selfishness.

In the latter period of his life Dr. Moore's thoughts were much turned to the contemplation of a future state, in which he firmly believed. His decay was gradual, and with little suffering. One day, after questioning me earnestly respecting the opinions of two eminent physicians whom he had consulted, and expressing a wish for the trial of more potent remedies, he said, “James, you may 'wonder that at my age, and with my in• firmities, I should be desirous of protracting • life; but I assure you, in truth, that at no * period of my youth was I ever happier.'

Not many weeks after this, he expired, in

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