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in the old house over the kitchen, and the house beyond it (which is connected), are long rows of hat-pegs, which possibly originated in the old tavern, and could never have been used since for that purpose, especially as a great many may still be seen in the larder. This part of the house appears to date back to the latter part of the 16th century. We must dispel the idea which has been cherished by many, that the old kitchen and the house above it ever belonged to the Devil Tavern, but hold that it was a part and parcel of the Sugar Loaf Tavern; then the fine commodious cellarage, which occupies the whole base of the house, likewise rather points to a tavern for its origin.

In Sir Francis Child's account, in the year 1707, is the following entry :

“Cost of new building the Sugar loaf £350.”

The following is a curious bill relating to this tavern, found amongst the old papers over Temple Bar:

M* Capt. Trevor, His bill —

March 17 Dohwood a bill

19 Wine ...

Bread & Bear
Syder....
Cheese & Butter

for to botles of Wine. June 21 to botles of Syder

for botles of Mountain 22 for botles of Syder

for Sallmon 26 to Lopsters

Salmon & Lodgings

3. 8. 9 0. 2. 0 0. 0. 8 0. 1. 4 0. 0. 9 0. 4. 0 0. 1. 4 0. 8. 0 0. 2. 8 0. 5. 0 0. 4. 0 0. 8. 9

pay for Lopsters
for Salmon
for 6, botles of Mountain

for 6 botles of Syder...
30 for 12 botles of Syder

to Botles of Mountain
6 Botles of Mountain
3 Botles of Port

0. 5. 6 0. 3. 0 0. 12. 0 0. 4. 0 0. 8. 0 0. 4. O 0. 12. 0 0. 6. 8

£8. 2. 5

July ye gth 1719 Receaved the full Contents of this Bill

Dorortey Biggins

0
her mark.

We do not see any reason for discrediting the statement that the whole of the Devil Tavern was pulled down in 1787, and of its having been purchased by Messrs. Child & Co. for the sum of £2800, and in the year following the row of houses now known as Child's Place was built upon the site. It may be worth recording that excellent cellars also run beneath the open space in front of those houses, as they were in all probability the cellars in which Simon Wadlow (the landlord, at the sign of “St Dunstan pulling the Devil by the nose," commonly known as the “Old Devil ”) kept his celebrated wines.

As Messrs. Child & Co. are the possessors of a few interesting relics of the Devil Tavern, it may not be considered out of place if the following paragraph from Peter Cunningham's 'Handbook of London' is quoted here :“In the time of Ben Jonson, who has given a lasting reputation to the house, the landlord's name was Simon Wadloe, the original of Old Sir Simon the King,' the favourite air of Squire Western in Tom Jones. The great room was called the Apollo. Thither came all who desired to be 'sealed of the tribe of Ben.' Here Jonson lorded it with greater authority than Dryden did afterwards at Will's, or Addison at Button's. The rules of the club, drawn up in the pure and elegant Latin of Jonson, and placed over the chimney, were, it is said, 'engraved in marble.' In the · Tatler' (No. 79) they are described as being 'in gold letters.' ' in gold letters. And this account

And this account agrees with the rules themselves—in gold letters

upon board-still

preserved in the banking-house of the Messrs. Child, where I had the pleasure of seeing them in 1843, with another and equally interesting relic of the Devil Tavern, the bust of Apollo. Over the door of the entrance to the Apollo the following verses were placed, which were written by Ben Jonson. Beneath these verses is the name of the author thus inscribed, 'O Rare Ben Jonson,' a posthumous tribute from his grave in Westminster Abbey, .

• Welcome all who lead or follow,
To the oracle of Apollo-
Here he speaks out of his pottle,
Or the tripos, his Tower bottle;
All his answers are divine,
Truth itself doth flow in wine.
Hang up all the poor hop-drinkers,
Cries old Sim, the king of skinkers ;
He the half of life abuses,
That sits watering with the Muses.
Those dull girls no good can mean us ;
Wine it is the milk of Venus,
And the poet's horse accounted:
Ply it, and you all are mounted,
'Tis the true Phoebean liquor;

Cheers the brains, makes wit the quicker,
Pays all debts, cures all diseases,
And at once three senses pleases.
Welcome all who lead or follow,
To the oracle of Apollo.'

.() Rare Ben Jonson.'

These relics are still preserved, and may be seen in one of the rooms above the old kitchen. It is a matter of regret that we have no means of ascertaining when the Marygold ceased to exist as a Tavern, and when that same sign was adopted for the goldsmith's trade by William Wheeler, who carried on his trade at Temple Bar certainly in the middle of the seventeenth century, and possibly much earlier. It is but little, we are sorry to say, we have to record about William Wheeler. The Goldsmiths' Company have the following entry in their books :

27th April 1666–

“ William Wheeler the sonne of William Wheeler Goldsmith deceased upon the testimony of William Rawson and John Marryott Goldsmiths was sworn and made free by Patrimony and paid as of custome.”

This is so far interesting and valuable as proving that there were two William Wheelers, goldsmiths, father and son, who possibly had carried on their trade here for thirty or forty years previously to this date, and might, for aught we know, have been long established as goldsmiths on the same spot or elsewhere.

In a manuscript book at Osterley Park, the magnificent seat of the Child family, the name of William Wheeler, junior, is scribbled over the fly-pages many times.

favourite air of Squire Western in Tom Jones. The great room was called the Apollo. Thither came all who desired to be sealed of the tribe of Ben.' Here Jonson lorded it with greater authority than Dryden did afterwards at Will's, or Addison at Button's. The rules of the club, drawn up in the pure and elegant Latin of Jonson, and placed over the chimney, were, it is said, 'engraved in marble.' In the · Tatler' (No. 79) they are described as being 'in gold letters. And this account agrees with the rules themselves—in gold letters upon

board-still

preserved in the banking-house of the Messrs. Child, where I had the pleasure of seeing them in 1843, with another and equally interesting relic of the Devil Tavern, the bust of Apollo. Over the door of the entrance to the Apollo the following verses were placed, which were written by Ben Jonson. Beneath these verses is the name of the author thus inscribed, O Rare Ben Jonson,' a posthumous tribute from his grave in Westminster Abbey.

• Welcome all who lead or follow,
To the oracle of Apollo-
Here he speaks out of his pottle,
Or the tripos, his Tower bottle ;
All his answers are divine,
Truth itself doth flow in wine.
Hang up all the poor hop-drinkers,
Cries old Sim, the king of skinkers ;
He the half of life abuses,
That sits watering with the Muses.
Those dull girls no good can mean us ;
Wine it is the milk of Venus,
And the poet's horse accounted:
Ply it, and you all are mounted,
'Tis the true Phæbean liquor ;

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