Beauty; Illustrated Chiefly by an Analysis and Classification of Beauty in Woman: Preceded by a Critical View of the General Hypotheses Respecting Beauty, by Hume, Hogarth, Burke, Knight, Alison, Etc., and Followed by a Similar View of the Hypotheses of Beauty in Sculpture and Painting, by Leonardo Da Vinci, Winckelmann, Mengs, Bossi, Etc

Cover
E. Wilson, 1836 - 395 Seiten

Im Buch

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Inhalt

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 27 - The intelligible forms of ancient poets, The fair humanities of old religion, The power, the beauty, and the majesty, That had their haunts in dale, or piny mountain, Or forest by slow stream, or pebbly spring, Or chasms and watery depths ; all these have vanished ; They live no longer in the faith of reason...
Seite 67 - On the whole, it appears to me, that what is called taste, in its most general acceptation, is not a simple idea, but is partly made up of a perception of the primary pleasures of sense, of the secondary pleasures of the imagination, and of the conclusions of the reasoning faculty, concerning the various relations of these, and concerning the human passions, manners, and actions.
Seite 72 - I fancy, to little purpose to look for the cause of our passions in association, until we fail of it in the natural properties of things.
Seite 132 - I may therefore conclude, that the passion of laughter is nothing else but sudden glory arising from some sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves, by comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly...
Seite 65 - In the morning of our days, when the senses are unworn and tender, when the whole man is awake in every part, and the gloss of novelty fresh upon all the objects that surround us, how lively at that time are our sensations, but how false and inaccurate the judgments we form of things!
Seite 141 - It is certain that the same object of distress which pleases in a tragedy, were it really set before us, would give the most unfeigned uneasiness, though it be then the most effectual cure to languor and indolence.
Seite 27 - They live no longer in the faith of reason ! But still the heart doth need a language, still Doth the old instinct bring back the old names...
Seite 68 - A young man whose passions are warm will be more sensibly touched with amorous and tender images than a man more advanced in years, who takes pleasure in wise, philosophical reflections concerning the conduct of life and moderation of the passions. At twenty, Ovid may be the favorite author, Horace at forty, and perhaps Tacitus at fifty.
Seite 63 - And this may arise from a natural weakness of understanding (in whatever the strength of that faculty may consist), or, which is much more commonly the case, it may arise from a want of a proper and welldirected exercise, which alone can make it strong and ready.
Seite 140 - I am convinced that we have a degree of delight, and that no small one, in the real misfortunes and pains of others...

Bibliografische Informationen