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send a return the moment I can collect the This indication of his intention was imme. reports. I bave the honour to be, &c. diately succeeded by the rapid and determined

PAGET, Lieut.-Gen. attack which he made upon your division To Licur.Gen. Sir J. Moore, K.B. - which occupied the right of your position. . I have forwarded the prisoners to Baniza. The events which occurred during that period On the other side of the river the enemy of the action you are fully acquainted with. formed again, and at this instant three guns The first effort of the enemy was met by the of Capt. Donovan's troop arrived, which did Commander of the forces, and by yourself, at considerable execution.

the head of the 4d regiment, and the brigade On the 24th of January, the Honourable "

under Major-General Lord William Bentinck. Captain Hope arrived in Downing-street of obstinate contest.

The village on your right became an object with a dispatch from Lieutenant General I lament to say, that soon after the severe Sir David Baird to Lord Viscount Castle. wound which deprived the army of your serreayh, one of his Majesty's Principal Se- vices, Lieut.-General Sir John Moore, who Clietaries of State, of which the following had just directed the most able disposition, is a copy :

fell by a cannon-shot. The troops, though His Majesty's Ship Ville de Paris, a: Sca, not unacquainted with the irreparable loss they January 18, 1809.

had sustained, were not dismayed; but by the My Lord-By the much lamented death mest determined bravery not only repelled of Lieutenant General Sir Jolin Moore, who every attempt of the enemy to gain ground, fell in action with the enemy on the 16th in- but actually forced him to retire, although stant, it has become my duty to acquaint your he had brought up fresh troops in support of Lordship, that the French army attacked the those originally engaged. British troops in the position they occupied in The enemy, finding himself foiled in every front of Corunna, at about two o'clock in the attempt to force the right of the position, enafternoon of that day.

deavoured by numbers to turn it. A judicious A severe wound, which compelled me to and well-timed movement, which was made by quit the field a short time previous to the fall Major General Paget, with the reserve, which of Sir John Moore, obliges me to refer your corps had moved uut of its cantonments to supLordship for the particulars of the action, port the right of the army, by a vigorous at. which was long and obstinately contested, to tack, defeated this intention. The Majorche inclosed report of Lieutenant General Hope General, having pushed forward the 95th (riwho succeeded to the Command of the army, file corps) and 1st battalion 52d regiment, drove and to whose ability and exertions in direction the enemy before him, and in his rapid and judiof the ardent zeal and unconquerable valour of cious advance, threatened the left of the ene. his Majesty's troops, is to be attributed, under my's position. This circumstance, with the Providence, the success of the day, which ter position of lieutenant General Fraser's divi. minated in the complete and entire repuise sion,(calculated to give still further security and defeat of the enemy at every point of at- to the right of the line) induced tbe enemy to tack.

relax his efforts in that quarter. The Hon. Capcain Gordon, my aid.de camp They were, however, more forcibly di. will have the honour of delivering this dis. rected towards the centre, where they were patch, and will be able to give your Lordship again successfully resisted by the brigade unany further information which may be re- der Major-general Manningham, forming tbe quired.

left of your division, and a part of that under I have the honour to be, &c. Major-general Leith, forming the right of

D. BAIAD, Licut. Gen. - the division under my orders. Upon the Icht, Rigbe Hun. Lord Viscount Castlerowgo.

the cacmy at first contented bimself with an His Majesty's ship Audacious, off Collana,

attack upon our picquets, which, however, SIR, January 18, 1809.

in general maintained their ground. Finding, In compliance with the desire contained in

however, his efforts unavailing on the right your communication of yesterday, I avail ay

and centre, he seemed determined to reader self of the first moinent I bave been able to

the attack upon the left more serious, and commaod, to detail to you the occurrences of

had succeeded in obtaining pussession of the the action which took place in front of Corun.

village through which the great road to Ma.

drid passes, and which was situated in front na on the 16th instant. It will be in your recollection, that about

of that part of the line. From this post, one in the afternoon of that day the enemy,

however, he was soon expelled, with conside. who had in the morning. received reinforce.

rable loss, by a gallant attack of some comments, and wbo had placed sonce guns in front

panies of the second battalion of the 14th of the right and left of the line, was observed

regiment, under Lieutenant-colonel Nicholls; to be moving troops towards his left fiank, and

before five in the evening, we had not only forming various columns of attack at that ex.

successfully repelled every attack made upon tremity of the strong and commanding position

the position, but had gained ground in al. which on the morning of the 15th hi had ta

most all points, and occupied a more forward ken in our imacdiatc front.

line than at the commencement of the action, immediate orders, the greatest praise is due. that you will speedily be restored to the ser. Major General Hill and Colonel Catlin Cran- vice of your country, and to lament the un. ford, with their brigades on the left of the po- fortunate circumstance that removed you from sition, ably supported their advanced posts. your station in the field, and threw the moThe brunt of the action fell upon the 4th, 420, mentary command into far less able hands. I 50cb, and 81st regiments, with parts of the have the honour to be, &c. brigade of guards, and the 26th regiment. my for the purpose of destroying the come equality which ought to prevail between all merce and resources of his Kingdom, the pubs great dations. lic revenue has continued in a course of pro

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JOHN HOPE, Lieut. Gen. Froin Lieut. Colonel Murray, Quarter Master To Lieutenant-General Sir Davis Baird, c. General, and the officers of the General Staft, The following copy of a letter froin I received the most marked assistance. I had the

nad the Hon. Michael De Courcy, Rear-Adreason to regret, that the illness of Brigadier General Clinton, Adjutant General, deprived

iniral of the White, to the Hon. William me of his aid. I was indebted to Brigadier Ge. Wellesley Pole, dated on board his Maneral Slade during the action, for a zealous of- jesty's ship the Tonnant, at Coranna, fer of his personal services, although the ca. the 17th and 18th instant, was received valry were embarked.

at the Admiralty.office, Jan. 24, 1809. The greater part of the fleet having gone to

January 17, 1809. sea yesterday evening, the whole being under Sir-Having it in design to detach the weigh, and the corps in the embarkation neces- Cossack to England as soon as her boats shall sarily much mixed on board, it is impossible at cease to be essential to the embarkation of present to lay before you a return of our casu. troops, I seize a moment to acquaint you, for alties. I hope the loss in numbers is not so the information of the Lords Commissioners considerable as might have been expected. If of the Admiralty, that the ships of war, as I was obliged to form an estimate I should say, per margin, and transports, under the orders that I believe it did not exceed in killed and of Rear Admiral Sir Samuel Hood and Com. wounded from seven to eight hundred; that of missioner Bowen, arrived at this anchorage the enemy must remain unknown, but many from Vigo on the 14th and 15th inst. The circumstances induce me to rate it at nearly Alfred and Hindostan, with some transports, double the above number. We have some pri- were left at Vigo to receive a brigade of three soners, but I have not been able to obtain an thousand five hundred men, that had taken account of the number; it is not, however, that route under the Generals Alten and considerable. Several Officers of rank have Crawford. fallen or been wounded, among whom I am in the vicinity of Corunna che enemy have only at present enabled to state the names of pressed upon the Britisb in great force. The Lieutenant-Colonel Napier, 92d regiment, embarkation of the sick, the cavalry, and Majors Napier and Stanhope, 50th regiment, the stores went on. The night of the 16th billed; Lieutenant-Colonel Winch, 4th regi- was appointed for the general embarkation of ment, Lieutenaat-Colonel Maxwell, 26th re- the infantry; and, mean time, the enemy giment, Lieutenant-Colonel Fane, 59ch regi. prepared for attack. At thice P. M an action ment, Lieutenant-Colonel Griffith, Guards, commenced; the enemy, which had beca Majors Miller and Williams, 81st regiment, posted on a lofty hill, endeavouring to force wounded.

the British on another hill of inferior height, s To you, who are well acquainted with the and nearer the town. W, excellent qualnies of Lieutenant General Sir The enemy were driven back with great John Moore, I need pot expatiate on the loss slaughter; but very sorry am I to add, that the army and his country have sustained by the British though triumphant, have suffered his death. His fall has deprived me of a valu-' severe lasses. I am unable to communicat able friend, to whom long experience of his further particulars, than that Sir Joho Moore worth had sincerely attached me. But it is received a mortal wound, of which he died at chiefly on public grounds that I must Tament night; that Sir David Baud lost an arm; the blow. It will be the consolation of every that several oficers and many men have been one who loved or respected his manly character, killed and wounded; and that the ships of that, after conducting the army through an war have received all such of the latter as they arduous retreat with consummate firmness, he could accommodate, the remainder being sent bus terminated a career of distinguished honour to transports..

. A T • by a death that has given the enemy additional The weather is now tera pestuous, and the

reason to respect the name of a british sol. difficolties of embarkation are great Allu "dier. Like the immortal Wolfe, he is snatched sept the rear guard are embark cd; consisting " from his country at an carly period of a lite perkinps at the present moment of two chouwing

spent in her service; Iske Woife, his last mo. sand siz bundred me The enemy having ments were gilded by the prospect of succesey brought cannon to a hil overhanging tha and cheared by the acclamation of victory like Wolfe, also, his memory will for ever rea Ville de Paris. Vittory atain sacred in that country which he sincerely lous, Implacable, Elizabeth, Norte, Play loved, and which he bad sp faithfully soreed geact, Resolution, Audacious, Enly It remains for n:c only to express my bopeMediator

skabet

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Count NICOLAS DE ROMANZOTT, gressive improvement. My Lords and Gentlemen,

Leiter from his Majesty the Emperor of all We are directed to inform you that the mea.

the RUSSIAS, and BONAPARTE, to his sure adopted by Parliament in the last Session,

MAJESTY, dated Erfurth, 12th October, for establishing a Local Militia, has been al

1808. Received October 21. ready attended with the happiest success, and

Sire-Les circonstances actuelles de promises to be extensively and permanently

l'Europe nous ont réunis à Erfurt. Notre beneficial to the Country.

première penxée est de céder au veu et aus We have received his Majesty's commands besoins de tous les peuples, et de chercher par most especially to recommend to you, that, une prompte pacification avec votre majeste, duly weighing the immense interests which le represe le plus ellicace aux malheurs qui are at stake in the war now carrying on, you pèsent sur toutes les nations. Nous en should proceed with as litlie delay as possible

faisons connoitre notre sincère désir à votre to consider of the most effectual measures for majesté par cette présente lettre. La guerre the augmentation of the regular army, in or- longue et sanglante qui a dechiré le Contider that his Majesty may be better ensbled. nent est terminée, sans qu'elle puisse se without impairing the means of defence at renouveller. Beaucoup de changemens ont home, to avail himseli of the militarwower eu lieu en Europe ; beaucoups d'etats ont été of his dominions in the great contest in which bouleversés. Le cause en est dans l'etat he is engaged ; and to conduct that contest,

1 d'agitation et de malheur où la cessation du under the blessing of Divine Providence, to a

commerce maritime a placé les plus grands

commerce conclusion compatible with the honour of his peuples. De plus grands changemens encore Majesty's Crown, and with the interest of his peuvent avoir lieu, et tous contraires à la Allies, of Europe, and of the world.

politique de la nation Angloise. La paix est donc à la fois dans l'intérêt des peoples du

Continent, comme dans l'intérêt des peuplcs Correspondence bettveen ibc British, Russian, and de la Grande Bretagne.-Nous nous reunis

French Governments; in consequence of the sons pour prier votre majesté d'écouter le Overtures received from Erfurtb; presented voix de l'humanité, en faisant taire celle des by his Majesty's command to borb Houses of passions, de chercher avec l'intention d'y Parliament.

parvenir, à concilier tous les intérêts, et par Letter from Count NICOLAS DE ROMAN

la garantir toutes les puissances qui existent,

et assurer le bonheur de l'Europe et de cette ZOFF, to Mr. Secretary CANNING, dated Erfurth, zoth September (12th October),

génération à la tête de laquelle la Providence

La October), nous a placé. 7808. Received October 21.

(Signe) ALEXANDRE. NAPOLEON, $11-I send to your Excellency a letter which the Emperors of Russia and France

TRANSLATIOX. wrote to his Majesty the King of England. SIR1-The presen: circumstances of Eus The Emperor of Russia flatters himself that rope have brooght us together at Erfurth. England will feel the grandeur and the sin. Our first thought is to yield to the wish and cerity of this step. She will there find the the wants of every people, and to seek, in a most natural and the most simple answer to speedy pacification with your majesty, the the overture which has been made by Ad. most efficacious remedy for the miseries miral Saumarez. The union of the two which oppress all nations. We make known empires is beyond the reach of all change, to your majesty our sincere desire in this and the two Emperors have formed it for respect by the present letter. peace as well as for war.

The long and bloody war which has torn His majesty has commanded me to make the Continent is at an end, without the pos. known to your cxcellency that he has no sibility of being renewed. Many changes minated plenipotentiaries, who will repair to have taken place in Europe; many states Puis, where they will await the answer have been overthrown. The cause is to be which your excellency may be pleased to found in the state of agitation and misery in make to me. I request you to address it to which the stagoation of maritime commerce the Russian ambassador at Paris The Ple has placed the greatest nations. Still greater nipotentiaries named by the Emperor of Rus. changes may yet take place, and all of them sia will repair to that city on the continent, contrary to the policy of the English nation. to which the plenipotentiaries of his Bri. Peace, thien, is at once the interest of the tannic majesty and his allies have been sent. Continent, as it is the incerest of the people

In respect to the bases of the negotiation, of Great Britain. theis Imperial majesty's see no difficulty in We unite in entreating your majesty to adopting all those' formerly proposed by listen to the voice of humanity, silencing England, namely, the uti possidetis, and every that of the passions; to seek, with the in. other basis founded upon the reciprocity and tention of arriving at that object, to concl.

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