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THE NATIONAL GALLERY-QUESTION. | clusion that in accepting the offer of a site

Six HENRY WILLOUGHBY said, he their independence would be not at all comwished to ask the right bon. Gentleman promised. I hope and trust that the House the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if a gal. will agree that the, view which they took lery for pictures is building, and in what was the just, proper, and honest one. This locality? If so, what will be the expense being the state of the case, and it being of such building, and out of what moneys settled that the building in Trafalgar voted by Parliament will such expense be Square shall be devoted to its original purdefrayed ?

pose, and its original purpose aloneTHE CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHE. namely, the reception of the pictures for QUER: The question of the hon. Baronet the National Gallery-an announcement refers to a matter of greater importance was made about that time by the proper than might be at first supposed. It really authorities, on the part of his Royal Highrefers to the question of a National Gal. ness the Prince of Wales, that he expected lery. The House will recollect that last his residence, Marlborough House, would Session, wearied by the continued unsettle- be ready for his reception with all convement of the question, and having no con- nient despatch. His Royal Highness refidence that any further inquiry by Select quired that it should be ready for him next Committees or Royal Commissions would November, and we ascertained that it produce a very satisfactory result, there would take not less than eight months to seemed to be a general feeling that the put that residence in a proper state for the Government should attempt to cut the reception of his Royal Highness. The Gordian knot and bring the question of the House is aware that for many years, National Gallery to a final settlement. I through the gracious kindness of Her Maundertook on the part of the Government, jesty, Marlborough House has been at the in deference to the feeling of the House, service of the public. It became necessary, to obtain that result if possible, and I have under these circumstances, to perform' our the pleasure of informing the House that I part of the agreement with the Trustees have succeeded in accomplishing that which of the National Gallery—that the Vernon appeared to be the general wish of the and Turner collections should be placed country. The whole of the building in in a proper receptacle until they can be reTrafalgar Square will speedily be entirely ceived in the building in Trafalgar Square, devoted to the National Gallery. I was so and not only placed in a proper receptacle, anxious on the part of the Government to but so completely under the control of the bring this long-vexed question to a satis- trustees and authorities that, wherever factory settlement, that I was prepared to they might for the moment be deposited, offer to the Royal Academy terms which no question could be raised hereafter as to were conceived in a liberal spirit. We whom they belonged, to what collection were prepared to recommend Her Majesty they pertained, and what authorities had to grant them a site, and I may say we the control and custody of them. Our first are prepared even now to recommend this idea was to prepare the building known House to vote a sum of money to raise a as the Carlton Ride for their reception ; building. But the Royal Academy, ani- but when it was examined into it was mated by a spirit which the House will ap- found that the expense would be very preciate, and which is worthy of that dis- considerable, that it would take not less tinguished body, considered that if the ex- than £3,000 to place the building in penditure for that purpose were defrayed a condition to receive the pictures, and ont of the public funds, their independence that, after all, it would not be fireproof. would be compromised ; and being in pos. It was almost impossible to engage a session of sufficient property themselves, building suitable for the purpose, and they announced their determination to under those circumstances it was suggestraise the building for themselves, and deed that we might erect a gallery on clined any public contribution. Taking into that part of the land at Kensington consideration, however, various questions, Gore, which I may say is rented of the into the merits of which we need not enter, Royal Commissioners, under the arrangethe position they occupied and the claim ment of last year, for the convenience of they might be said to possess from having the Government ; that such a gallery had a residence furnished, if not granted, would receive the Turner and Vernon colby the Crown originally, and enjoyed so lections until the building of Trafalgar long, the Royal Academy came to the con- Square is ready to receive them, and that suggestion which had been made by the take upon the subject; because, whilst noble Earl opposite (Earl Grey). His desiring to be accurate, and to omit no noble Friend had used the words, that point in the sequence of events which there were parts of the Bill which Her Ma- bore upon this question, he had stated jesty's Government would require the local that there were blots and blemishes in Legislature to alter. From this it was to the Bill, which the colonial Legislature be inferred, that in the judgment of the would be required to alter ; but in doing Government the alterations to be required so, he had not laid sufficient stress upon were important. Now, he wished his noble the fact, that every one of those blots and Friend to weigh well the exceeding disad- blemishes was really, in itself, unimporvantage to which the Government would tant, when considered with regard to the be put in enforcing what they believed to general operation of the Bill. It would, be necessary for the great end they had no doubt, be advantageous to the completein view, if they let this power pass out of ness and entirety of the measure, that those their own hands; for in the local Assem- blots should be amended ; but he did not bly there might be persons who would foresee the possibility of any practical endeavour to outvote those who had given evil resulting from them, though they the pledge that the alteration should be might be left as they now were. More made ; and then, in what position would than that, the noble Earl must be well the Government be, if, having understood aware that, even supposing — which he that the alterations would be made which himself had no reason to suppose the they deemed to be important, they were colonial Legislature did refuse to make defeated in the House of Assembly of Ja- the alterations that were desirable, there maica, and the Bill became law with those were powers in the hands of the Colonial defects which they themselves thought Minister for bringing them to reason, if he should first be struck out of the measure ? might use the words, should that become The more important that it was both for vecessary. But he must say, that the the native races, and for our West India colonial Legislature, throughout the whole Islands, that properly conducted immigra- of these transactions, had shown an hontion should be encouraged and fostered, ourable desire to meet the Government with the more anxious was he that no such mis. the most perfect good faith. No doubt it take should be committed ; because, if the was a disappointment to them to hear Bill worked badly for the immigrant when of the disallowance of an Act in reference it thus became law, and there were to be to which they had erred, as he believed, admitted cases of abuse in the West India unintentionally. But they at once adIslands, and a cry arose in this country dressed themselves to the task of remedy, against the principle of free immigration ing the error with good faith, and had itself, grounded upon the evils which had honestly endeavoured to carry out the been allowed to creep, in, it would be far principle laid down in the despatch of his more difficult afterwards, when the jealousy noble Friend, the then Colonial Secretary. of the people had been excited concerning it, to establish and foster a proper system

House adjourned at a quarter-past

Six o'clock, to Thursday next, of immigration than to prevent the evils

half-past Ten o'clock. attaching to the subject at the outset. He would suggest to his noble Friend, therefore, whether Her Majesty's Government should adopt an intermediate course, and say-not that they would not present the Bill for Her Majesty's sanction—but that HOUSE OF COMMONS, they would not present it with those blemishes ; and in the meanwhile have it Tuesday, February 8, 1859. printed with the correspondence, and laid upon the table of the House, so that it Minutes.] New Writs Issued.— For Enniskillen, might be possible for their Lordships to

v. The Right Hon. James Whiteside, Steward form their own judgment with regard to

of Hempholme; For Greenwich, v.John Town

send, esq., Steward of Northstead. the importance of those matters, before New MEMBERS SWORN -For Linlithgow (Counit was presented to Her Majesty for her

ty), Charles Baillie, esq. ; For Boston, William approbation.

Henry Adams, esq. THE EARL OF CARNARVON was afraid

PUBLIC Bills.—1• Sale of Poisons; Mai riage

Law Amendment; Church Rates Abolition ; that he had led the House-into some mis. Church Rates Commutation ; Elections, &c.

THE NATIONAL GALLERY-QUESTION. clusion that in accepting the offer of a site

Sir HENRY WILLOUGHBY said, he their independence would be not at all comwished to ask the right hon. Gentleman promised. I hope and trust that the House the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if a gal. will agree that the view which they took lery for pictures is building, and in what was the just, proper, and honest one. This locality? If so, what will be the expense being the state of the case, and it being of such building, and out of what moneys settled that the building in Trafalgar voted by Parliament will such expense be Square shall be devoted to its original purdefrayed ?

pose, and its original purpose alone THE CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHE. namely, the reception of the pictures for QUER: The question of the hon. Baronet the National Gallery-an announcement refers to a matter of greater importance was made about that time by the proper than might be at first supposed. It really authorities, on the part of his Royal Highrefers to the question of a National Gal ness the Prince of Wales, that he expected lery. The House will recollect that last his residence, Marlborough House, would Session, wearied by the continued unsettle- be ready for his reception with all convement of the question, and having no con- vient despatch. His Royal Highness refidence that any further inquiry by Select quired that it should be ready for him next Committees or Royal Commissions would November, and we ascertained that it produce a very satisfactory result, there would take not less than eight months to seemed to be a general feeling that the put that residence in a proper state for the Government should attempt to cut the reception of his Royal Highness. The Gordian knot and bring the question of the House is aware that for many years, National Gallery to a final settlement. I through the gracious kindness of Her Maundertook on the part of the Government, jesty, Marlborough House has been at the in deference to the feeling of the House, service of the public. It became necessary, to obtain that result if possible, and I have under these circumstances, to perform our the pleasure of informing the House that I part of the agreement with the Trustees have succeeded in accomplishing that wbich of the National Gallery—that the Vernon appeared to be the general wish of the and Turner collections should be placed country. The whole of the building in in a proper receptacle until they can be reTrafalgar Square will speedily be entirely ceived in the building in Trafalgar Square, devoted to the National Gallery. I was so and not only placed in a proper receptacle, anxious on the part of the Government to but so completely under the control of the bring this long-vexed question to a satis- trustees and authorities that, wherever factory settlement, that I was prepared to they might for the moment be deposited, offer to the Royal Academy terms which no question could be raised hereafter as to were conceived in a liberal spirit. We whom they belonged, to what collection were prepared to recommend Her Majesty they pertained, and what authorities had to grant them a site, and I may say we the control and custody of them. Our first are prepared even now to recommend this idea was to prepare the building known House to vote a sum of money to raise a as the Carlton Ride for their reception ; building. But the Royal Academy, ani- but when it was examined into it was mated by a spirit which the House will ap- found that the expense would be very preciate, and which is worthy of that dis. considerable, that it would take not less tinguished body, considered that if the ex. than £3,000 to place the building in penditure for that purpose were defrayed a condition to receive the pictures, and out of the public funds, their independence that, after all, it would not be fireproof. would be compromised ; and being in pos. It was almost impossible to engage a session of sufficient property themselves, building suitable for the purpose, and they announced their determination to under those circumstances it was suggestraise the building for themselves, and deed that we might erect a gallery on clined any public contribution. Taking into that part of the land at Kensington consideration, however, various questions, Gore, which I may say is rented of the into the merits of which we need not enter, Royal Commissioners, under the arrangethe position they occupied and the claim ment of last year, for the convenience of they might be said to possess from having the Government ; that such a gallery bad a residence furnished, if not granted, would receive the Turner and Vernon colby the Crown originally, and enjoyed so lections until the building of Trafalgar long, the Royal Academy came to the con- Square is ready to receive them, and that they would be connected with the collec- MR. KINNAIRD inquired, whether the tion granted to the country by Mr. Sheep- right hon. Gentleman could inform the shanks. It was, of course, impossible, as House what site would be granted to the Parliament was not sitting and could not Royal Academy for their new building ? be consulted, to settle the question definitely, THE CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEbut as is usual on such occasions, the QUER.--Part of the ground round BurTreasury had thought fit to take the respon- lington House. The Royal Academy will sibility of ordering the necessary altera- be connected with other public buildings. tions. As far as expense is concerned, The interior will be left to the disposition the first estimate which was made for this of the Academy; the exterior will be subbuilding at Kensington was not as great as ordinate to the design of the Government, the expense which would have been in- if the Government insist upon that concurred in the temporarily fitting up of dition. Carlton Ride, although it was thought expedient afterwards that the expense

MANNING THE NAVY. should be increased. It was thought

QUESTION. expedient for this reason-it is necessary Sir CHARLES NAPIER said, he that the curators of the National Gallery, would beg to inquire of the First Lord of the agents of the Trustees, shall have the Admiralty when the Report of the complete control of the collection, that Commission for Manning the Navy, with they may not pass under any other autho- the evidence taken before the Commis. rity; and therefore it is necessary that sioners, will be laid on the table of the apartments shall be prepared for them, House; and also when the Return of Deand also that accommodation shall be serters, moved for last Session, will be given for the overflow of pictures now ac- laid on the table of the House ? cruing to the National Gallery. Although, Sir JOHN PAKINGTON said, that in consequence of this, there has been some in answer to the first part of the hon. and considerable addition made to the original gallant Admiral's question, he could inestimate, I believe the whole sum to be form him that the Royal Commissioners on expended on this temporary gallery will the question of the best means of manning not amount to the annual rent of the pre- the Navy were now considering their Remises which we once contemplated en- port, and he had every reason to believe gaging for this purpose.

I trust the hon. that he should receive it in a week or ten Baronet will feel that every care has been days, when he should at once lay it on the taken that the expenditure shall not exceed table of the House. He could only hope, a reasonable amount. The result will be with respect to the latter portion of the that, I hope, at the end of two years the question, that it would be borne in mind Royal Academy will be established in their on both sides of the House that returns of new building on the new site ; that the this character took a great deal of time building in Trafalgar Square will be com- and labour. The return of deserters could pletely devoted to the national collections not be prepared in less than two inonths of pictures, including the Turner and Ver- from this time at the earliest. Six clerks non collections, as well as others which had been employed on this one ever since may hereafter be left to the country ; and last August, and it would probably cost that there will then be left to the country, the country not less than £500. Perhaps for the expenditure which they are now he ought to blame himself for granting it, incurring, a building at Kensington which and certainly had he been aware of the will be of the greatest use to the Govern- expense and labour it entailed he should ment on many occasions and for many not have done so. He hoped the hon. purposes, when, as all who have had the Member, on future occasions, would abmanagement of affairs of this kind know, stain, as far as possible, from moving for a want of accommodation springs up in an returns of this nature, which involved an accidental and casual manner, the non

expense, without being of a supply of which is of great injury to the commensurate value or utility. public service.

I trust that the explanation which I have now given, which I

MILITARY IIONOURS. should otherwise have given upon another

QUESTION. occasion, but which I thought due to the Mr. LAURIE said, he wished to ask House after the inquiry of the hon. Baronet the Secretary of State for War when it — will prove satisfactory.

would be probable that the Turkish medal,

enormous

80 long promised by the Sultan, will be offer itself when the Reform Bill came issued to the army engaged in the Crimea; under the consideration of the House. and whether it is intended that a medal should be awarded to the troops engaged THE ATLANTIC TELEGRAPH. during the Indian eampaign ; and if the

QUESTION. report is correct that several of the Queen's MR. H. BERKELEY said, he begged regiments are now ordered home? to ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if

GENERAL PEEL, in reply, begged to in- it be true that Her Majesty's Government form his hon. Friend that about half are about to grant a guarantee or subsidy the Turkish medals had arrived in this to the Atlantic Telegraph Company; and, country, and would be distributed to the if so, upon what conditions ? troops immediately, those present with THE CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEtheir regiments receiving them in the first QUER said, that several applications bad instance ; 47,000 had arrived, of which been made to the Treasury for a subsidy 10,000 had been appropriated to the Navy. for the purpose referred to ; but, as no He stated last year that Her Majesty Resolution had been come to of the kind bad been graciously pleased to grant a mentioned by the hon. Gentleman, it was medal to the troops serving in India, not in his power to answer the question. with clasps for those present at the capture of Delhi and Lucknow, and FUNDING OF EXCHEQUER BILLS. the relief of Lucknow, and also to the

QUESTION. garrison of Lucknow. With reference Sir GEORGE LEWIS said, he wished to whether troops had been ordered home to inquire of the Chancellor of the Exchefrom India, he could only say that none quer if any funding of Exchequer bills had had been ordered home except those recently taken place; and, if so, to what who would, in the natural course of their extent, and by what authority ? service, have returned last year,

but THE CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEwho were detained in consequence of the QUER said, there had been some fundbreaking out of the mutiny. He be- ing of Exchequer bills, he believed to the lieved that about seven infantry regi- amount of £7,600,000, by the authority ments and one cavalry regiment would re- of the Commissioners of Savings Banks. turn.

This course had been rendered necessary

by the financial operations of the war. THE CORRUPT PRACTICES PREVENTION Several Votes had been taken in the shape ACT.-QUESTION.

of Exchequer bills, but the number in exMR. H. BERKELEY said, he wished to istence was such that it was not thought ask the Attorney General whether, seeing desirable at that moment to place more of the probability of an early dissolution of them in the market. The same operation Parliament, it is his intention to deal with had been frequently resorted to by the the Corrupt Practices Prevention Act, so as Treasury, even under circumstances of less to endeavour to correct its tendencies, or perplexity than the present, and of course to permit the electors of Great Britain it made not the slightest difference in the and Ireland to elect Members under its liabilities of the country. present enactments.

SIR GEORGE LEWIS said, he did THE ATTORNEY GENERAL replied, not know if he had caught the right hon. that the question was one of very great Gentleman's words correctly—that certain importance. The subject had received, Exchequer bills authorized to meet votes and would continue to receive, the anxious of credit had not been issued. What he consideration of Her Majesty's Govern- wanted to know was, whether the Exchement. He could not admit that the ques- quer bills which had been lately funded tion had been left unconsidered in the last were in the hands of the Commissioners of Session of Parliament ; nor was he able at Savings Banks, or whether they had been the present moment to state with any previously issued by the Government ? precision what course the Government The CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEintended to take. An early opportunity QUER said, the right hon. Gentleman had would be taken by some Member of misunderstood him, if he supposed he had the Governme to bring the subject under said that these bills had not been issued. the attention of the House, and to make a Of course they had been issued. What he statement which he hoped would be satis- had meant to convey was, that from the factory. Possibly that opportunity would large amount of those securities in the

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