Manual of English Rhetoric

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American Book Company, 1875 - 310 Seiten
 

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Inhalt

1
206
SECT PAGE 125 Requisites of a Dialogue
208
Epistolary Prose
209
CHAPTER II
210
Scientific Prose
211
Use of general terms Technical terms Sources of tech nical terms Under what conditions to be used
212
Use of Figurative language
214
Popular Scientific Prose
215
Criticism
216
CHAPTER III
217
Genuine Historical method
218
Essential qualities 1 Truth 2 Local color 3 Signifi cance of facts exhibited 4 Completeness
219
Historical Arrangement Chronological Method Topical Method Pragmatic Method Natural Method
222
Distribution into Periods
225
Introduction and Conclusion
226
Essential qualities of Historical Style
227
Division of History Universal History Special History Biography Special Histories of Institutions Industries Arts etc
230
CHAPTER IV
231
Theme of an Oratorical Discourse
232
sions depend?
236
Rules for Exhortation Allaying hostile feelings
238
Oratorical Disposition Parts of an Oratorical Discourse
239
Exordium Sources of
241
Qualities of an Exordium 212
242
Body of the Speech Announcement of the Theme An nouncement of the Plan
244
Special rules for arranging the Arguments and Motives
245
Peroration Qualities of
251
Characteristics of Oratorical Style 1 Direct Address 2
253
Different kinds of Oratory
260
Judicial or Forensic Oratory Compared with Political
261
Means of accomplishing its end
267
Its style
269
Instruction an essential requisite
272
Religious exhortation
273
Familiarity
274
Religious Diction
275
Two kinds of religious oratorical Discourse The Sermon The Homily
276
Recapitulation
278
Conclusion
279
Urheberrecht

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Seite 110 - Methinks I see her as an eagle mewing her mighty youth, and kindling her undazzled eyes at the full midday beam, purging and unsealing her long-abused sight at the fountain itself of heavenly radiance; while the whole noise of timorous and flocking birds, with those also that love the twilight, flutter about, amazed at what she means, and in their envious gabble would prognosticate a year of sects and schisms.
Seite 108 - O eloquent, just, and mighty Death ! whom none could advise, thou hast persuaded ; what none hath dared, thou hast done ; and whom all the world hath flattered, thou only hast cast out of the world and despised ; thou hast drawn together all the far-stretched greatness, all the pride, cruelty, and ambition of man, and covered it all over with these two narrow words, Hie jaeet ! Lastly, whereas this book, by the title it hath, calls itself The First Part of tlie General History of the World...
Seite 110 - But, alas ! you are not all here ! Time and the sword have thinned your ranks. Prescott, Putnam, Stark, Brooks, Read, Pomeroy, Bridge! our eyes seek for you in vain amid this broken band. You are gathered to your fathers, and live only to your country in her grateful remembrance and your own bright example.
Seite 152 - Homer was the greater genius, Virgil the better artist. In one we most admire the man, in the other the work. Homer hurries and transports us with a commanding impetuosity, Virgil leads us with an attractive majesty. Homer scatters with a generous profusion, Virgil bestows with a careful magnificence.
Seite 62 - The style of Dryden is capricious and varied ; that of Pope is cautious and uniform. Dryden obeys the motions of his own mind ; Pope constrains his mind to his own rules of composition. Dryden is sometimes vehement and rapid ; Pope is always smooth, uniform, and gentle.
Seite 109 - The circumstances, now clearly in evidence, spread out the whole scene before us. Deep sleep had fallen on the destined victim, and on all beneath his roof. A healthful old man, to whom sleep was sweet — the first sound slumbers of the night held him in their soft but strong embrace.
Seite 113 - Thus the ideas, as well as children, of our youth often die before us; and our minds represent to us those tombs to which we are approaching; where though the brass and marble remain, yet the inscriptions are effaced by time, and the imagery moulders away.
Seite 70 - On seeking for some clue to the law underlying these current maxims, we may see shadowed forth in many of them, the importance of economizing the reader's or hearer's attention. To so present ideas that they may be apprehended with the least possible mental effort, is the desideratum towards which most of the rules above quoted point.
Seite 59 - If I ascend up into heaven, thou art there: if I make my bed in hell, behold, thou art there. If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea; Even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me. If I say, Surely the darkness shall cover me; even the night shall be light about me, Yea, the darkness hideth not from thee; but the night shineth as the day: the darkness and the light are both alike to thee.
Seite 117 - Is not a patron, my lord, one who looks with unconcern on a man struggling for life in the water, and, when he has reached ground, encumbers him with help?

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