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of navigation, has not been bepaddled with them? It is not my purpose to enter the list of disputants, lately sprung up, striving to prove that the immortal FulTON was not the first successful projector of a steamboat. In common with the world, I can but mourn over the poverty of history, that tells not of any previous successful effort of the kind. Steam, no doubt, was known before. The first tea-kettle that was hung over a fire, furnished a clear development of that important agent. But all I can say now, is, that I never heard of a steam-boat, before the 'North River moved her paddles on the Hudson; and very soon after that period, when it was contemplated to send a steam-boat to Southern Russia, a distinguished orator of that day, in an address before the New-York Historical Society, eloquently said, in direct allusion to the steam-boat: "The hoary genius of Asia, high throned on the peaks of Caucasus, his moist eye glistening as he glances over the destruction of Palmyra and Persepolis, of Jerusalem and of Babylon, will bend with respectful deference to the inventive spirit of this western world ; thus proving conclusively, that the invention was not only of this country, but that no other country yet knew of it. In fact the invention had not yet even reached the Mississippi ; for it was not until a year after, that a long-armed, high-shouldered keel-boatman, who had just succeeded in doubling a bend in the river, by dint of hard pushing, and run his boat in a quiet eddy, for a resting spell, saw a steam-boat gallantly paddling up against the centre current of that 'Father of Rivers,' and gazing at the scene with mingled surprise and triumph, he threw down his pole, and,

slapping his hands together in extacy, exclaimed: Well done, old Massassippi! May I be etarnally smashed, if you ha' n't got your match at last !

But as before hinted, it is not my design to furnish a conclusive history of the origin of steam-boats. My text stands at the head of this article ; and I purpose here to record, for the information of all future time, a faithful history of "THE FIRST LOCOMOTIVE.' I am determined, at least that that branch of the great steam family shall know its true origin.

In the year 1808, I enjoyed the never-to-be-forgotten gratification of a paddle up the Hudson, on board the aforesaid first steam-boat that ever moved on the waters of any river, with passengers. Among the voyagers, was a man I had known for some years previous, by the name of Jabez Doolittle. He was an industrious and ingenious worker in sheet-iron, tin, and wire; but his greatest success lay in wirework, especially in making rat-traps ;' and for his last and best invention in that line, he had just secured a patent: and with a specimen of his work, he was then on a journey through the state of NewYork, for the purpose of disposing of what he called county rights; or, in other words, to sell the privilege of catching rats, according to his patent trap. It was a very curious trap, as simple as it was ingenious; as most ingenious things are, after they are invented. It was an oblong wire-box, divided into two compartments; a rat entered one, where the bait was hung, which he no sooner touched, than the door at which he entered, fell. His only apparent escape was by a funnel-shaped hole into the other apartment, in passing which he moved another wire

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which instantly re-set the trap; and thus rat after rat was furnished the means of 'following in the foot-steps of his illustrious predecessor, until the trap was full. Thus it was not simply a trap to catch a rat, but a trap by which rats trapped rats, ad infinitum. And now that the recollection of that wonderful trap is recalled to my memory, I would respectfully recommend it to the attention of the treasury department, as an appendage to the sub-treasury system. The specification may be found on file in the patent office, number eleven thousand seven hundred and forty-six.

This trap, at the time to which I allude, absolutely divided the attention of the passengers; and for my part, it interested me quite as much as did the steamengine; because, perhaps, I could more easily comprehend its mystery. To me the steam-engine was Greek; the trap was plain English. Not so, however, to Jabez Doolittle. I found him studying the engine with great avidity and perseverance, insomuch that the engineer evidently became alarmed, and declined answering any more questions.

Why, you need n't snap off so tarnal short,' said Jabez; 'a body would think you had n't got a patent for your machine. If I can't meddle with you on the water, as nigh as I can calculate, I'll be up to you on land, one of these days.'

These ominous words fell on my ear, as I saw Jabez issue from the engine-room, followed by the engineer, who seemed evidently to have got his steam up.

Well,' said I, 'Jabez, what do you think of this mighty machine ?' 'Why,' he replied, 'if that crit

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ter had n't got riled up so soon, a body could tell more about it; but I reckon I've got a leetle notion on't ;' and then taking me aside, and looking carefully around, lest some one should overhear him, he then and there' assured me in confidence, in profound secresy, that if he did n't make a wagon go by steam, before he was two years older, then he'd give up invention. I at first ridiculed the idea ; but when I thought of that rat-trap, and saw before me a man with sharp twinkling gray eyes, a pointed nose, and every line of his visage a channel of investigation and invention, I could not resist the conclusion, that if he really ever did attempt to meddle with hot water, we should hear more of it.

Time went on. Steam-boats multiplied; but none dreamed, or if they did, they never told their dreams, of a steam-wagon; for even the name of locomotive' was then as unknown as “loco-foco.' When, about a year after the declaration of the last war with England, (and may it be the last !) I got a letter from Jabez, marked 'private,' telling me that he wanted to see me most desperately, and that I must make him a visit at his place 'nigh Wallingford.' The din of arms,

and the destruction of insurance companies, the smashing of banks, and suspension of specie payments, and various other inseparable attendants on the show and pomp and circumstance of glorious war,' had in the mean time entirely wiped from memory my friend Jabez, and his wonderful rat-trap. But I obeyed his summons, not knowing but that something of importance to the army or navy might come of it. On reaching his residence, imagine my

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surprise, when he told me, he believed he had got the notion.'

Notion ?-what notion ?? I inquired. 'Why,' says he, that steam-wagon I telld you about, a spell ago;' 'but,' added he, 'it has pretty nigh starved me out;' and sure enough, he did look as if he had been on the anxious-seat,' as he used to say, when things puzzled him.

'I have used up,' said he, “plaguey nigh all the sheet-iron, and old stove-pipes, and mill-wheels, and trunnel-heads, in these parts; but I've succeeded; and for fear that some of these 'cute folks about here may have got a peep through the key-hole, and will trouble me when I come to get a patent, I've sent for you to be a witness; for you was the first and only man I ever hinted the notion to; in fact,' continued he, 'I think the most curious part of this invention is, that as yet I don't know any one about here who has been able to guess what I'm about. They all know it is an invention, of some kind, for that's my business, you know ; but some say it is a thrashingmachine, some a distillery ; and of late, they begin to think it's a shingle-splitter ; but they'll sing another tune, when they see it spinning along past the stage-coaches,' added he, with a knowing chúckle, won't they?

This brought us to the door of an old clap-boarded, dingy, long, one-story building, with a window or two in the roof, the knot-holes and cracks all carefully stuffed with old rags, and over the door he was unlocking, was written, in bold letters, No ADMITTANCE. This was his sanctum sanctorum.' I could occupy pages in description of it, for every part

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