The Orations of Demosthenes: Orations on occasions of public deliberation, continued. Oration of Dinarchus against Demosthenes. Orations of Æschines and Demosthenes: Æschines against Ctesiphon. Demosthenes on the crown

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Seite 233 - ... he hath influenced, to fortune, to the times, to the world; while the other is silent when he ought to speak, but when some melancholy accident hath happened he dwells on this with the most invidious censure. That was the time (I repeat it) for a man sincerely attached to his country and to truth. Yet, such is my confidence in the abundant merits of my cause, that if any man can now point out a better course, nay, if there be any course at all but that which I pursued, I shall confess myself...
Seite 229 - I shall now explain the circumstances of that state. Those of its citizens whom his gold could corrupt or his artifice deceive are all at his devotion ; those who at first opposed and continue to oppose him he finds incapable of being wrought on. What then is his design?
Seite 272 - I have uniformly pursued the just and virtuous course of conduct : assertor of the honors, of the prerogatives, of the glory of my country : studious to support them, zealous to advance them, my whole being is devoted to this glorious cause. I was never known to march through the city with a face of joy and exultation at the success of a foreign power ; embracing, and announcing the joyful tidings to those who I supposed would transmit it to the proper place. I...
Seite 238 - ... of all posterity. For if you now pronounce, that as my public conduct hath not been right, Ctesiphon must stand condemned, it must be thought that you yourselves have acted wrong, not that you owe your present state to the caprice of fortune.
Seite 236 - ... claimed the first rank in Greece had resigned this rank in time of danger, she had incurred the censure of betraying the whole nation to the enemy. If we had indeed given up those points without one blow, for which our fathers encountered every peril, who would not have spurned you with scorn ? — you, the author of such conduct, not the state, or me ? In the name of Heaven ! say, with what face could we have met those foreigners who sometimes visit us if such scandalous supineness on our part...
Seite 266 - Was he not to make Boeotia our barrier on the midland side ? the cities bordering on Peloponnesus our bulwark on that quarter? Was he not to attend with due precaution to the importation of corn, that this trade might be protected through all its progress up to our own...
Seite 238 - For if you now pronounce that, as my public conduct hath not been right, Ctesiphon must stand condemned, it must be thought that you yourselves have acted wrong, not that you owe your present state to the caprice of fortune. But it cannot be! No, my countrymen, it cannot be that you have acted wrong in encountering danger bravely for the liberty and safety of all Greece. No! by those generous souls of ancient times who were exposed at Marathon!
Seite 88 - You see, Athenians! what forces are prepared, what numbers formed and arrayed, what soliciting through the assembly, by a certain party : — and all this to oppose the fair and ordinary course of justice in the state. As to me, I stand here in firm reliance, first on the immortal gods, next on the laws and you, convinced that faction never can have greater weight with you than law and justice.
Seite 257 - I then advised, but the superior force of truth, and your utter inability to point out any more eligible^ course ;) if this was the case, I say, is it not highly cruel and unjust to arraign those measures now, when you could not then propose any better 1 Note 2.
Seite 236 - ... case, must this city have pursued the very same conduct, if she had retained a thought of glory, of her ancestors, or of future times. For, thus, she could only have been deemed unfortunate in her attempts: and misfortunes are the lot of all men, whenever it may please Heaven to inflict them. But if that state which once claimed the first rank in Greece, had resigned this rank, in time of danger, she had incurred the censure of betraying the whole nation to the enemy. — If we had indeed given...

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