The New monthly magazine and universal register. [Continued as] The New monthly magazine and literary journal (and humorist) [afterw.] The New monthly (magazine).

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Seite 287 - Never indeed was any man more contented with doing his duty in that state of life to which it had pleased God to call him.
Seite 520 - Wales : together with their provisional allowance during confinement ; as reported to the society for the discharge and relief of small debtors, in April, May, June, &c., 18oo. 4to., 18oo. An account of the rise, progress and present state of the society for the discharge and relief of persons imprisoned for small debts throughout England and Wales.
Seite 247 - And they said, Go to, let us build us a city, and a tower whose top may reach unto heaven, and let us make us a name, lest we be scattered abroad upon the face of the whole earth.
Seite 191 - Always acting as if in the presence of canonized forefathers, the spirit of freedom, leading in itself to misrule and excess, is tempered with an awful gravity. This idea of a liberal descent inspires us with a sense of habitual native dignity, which prevents that upstart insolence almost inevitably adhering to and disgracing those who are the first acquirers of any distinction.* Ey this means our liberty becomes a noble freedom.
Seite 245 - But the poor dog, in life the firmest friend, The first to welcome, foremost to defend, Whose honest heart is still his master's own, Who labours, fights, lives, breathes for him alone...
Seite 192 - By this means our liberty becomes a noble freedom. It carries an imposing and majestic aspect. It has a pedigree and illustrating ancestors. It has its bearings and its ensigns armorial. It has its gallery of portraits; its monumental inscriptions; its records, evidences, and titles.
Seite 9 - To be bred in a place of estimation ; to see nothing low and sordid from one's infancy ; to be taught to respect one's self; to be habituated to the censorial inspection of the public eye ; to look early to public opinion ; to stand upon such elevated ground as to be enabled to take a large...
Seite 402 - Before I had learned from the note the name and business of my visitor, I was struck with the manliness of his person, the breadth of his chest, the openness of his countenance, and the inquietude of his eye.
Seite 1 - All this violent cry against the nobility I take to be a mere work of art. To be honoured and even privileged by the laws, opinions, and inveterate usages of our country, growing out of the prejudice of ages, has nothing to provoke horror and indignation in any man.
Seite 404 - I could lie down like a tired child, And weep away this life of care, Which I have borne, and still must bear, Till death like sleep might...

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