A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy

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Joseph Thomas, 1841 - 172 Seiten
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LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - john257hopper - LibraryThing

This 250 year old novel was a fictional satire on a more serious non-fictional account of a journey through France and Italy by Sterne's contemporary Tobias Smollett. The satire is in the fact that ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - Marse - LibraryThing

A Sentimental Journey is the story of a man traveling from England to France and back and his adventures, or should I say, his encounters during the trip. We don't get a lot of "travel" descriptions ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

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Seite 42 - The learned SMELFUNGUS travelled from Boulogne to Paris from Paris to Rome and so on but he set out with the spleen and jaundice, and every object he pass'd by was discoloured or distorted He wrote an account of them, but 'twas nothing but the account of his miserable feelings.
Seite 68 - The pail of water standing beside the great deep, makes certainly but a sorry figure in speech, but 'twill be said it has one advantage: 'tis in the next room, and the truth of the buckle may be tried in it, without more ado, in a single moment. In honest truth, and upon a more candid revision of the matter, The French expression professes more than it performs. I think I can see the precise and distinguishing marks of national characters more in these nonsensical minutite, than in the most important...
Seite 98 - I was going to begin with the millions of my fellow-creatures born to no inheritance but slavery; but finding, however affecting the picture was, that I could not bring it near me, and that the multitude of sad groups in it did but distract me, I took a single captive, and having first shut him up in his dungeon, I then looked through the twilight of his grated door to take his picture.
Seite 42 - Turin, in his return home; and a sad tale of sorrowful adventures he had to tell, "wherein he spoke of moving accidents by flood and field, and of the cannibals which each other eat: the Anthropophagi" he had been flay'd alive, and bedevil'd, and used worse than St. Bartholomew, at every stage he had come at I'll tell it, cried Smelfungus, to the world. You had better tell it, said I, to your physician.
Seite 151 - In a word, I thought I beheld Religion mixing in the dance; but as I had never seen her so engaged, I should have...
Seite 5 - Truth might lie between He was certainly sixtyfive; and the general air of his countenance, notwithstanding something seem'd to have been planting wrinkles in it before their time, agreed to the account. It was one of those heads...
Seite 147 - ... mere pomp of words! — but that I feel some generous joys and generous cares beyond myself ; all comes from thee, great, great Sensorium of the world ! which vibrates, if a hair of our heads but fallso upon the ground, in the remotest desert of thy creation.
Seite 42 - ... was I in a desert, I would find out wherewith in it to call forth my affections : — if I could not do better, I would fasten them upon some sweet myrtle, or seek some melancholy cypress to connect myself to; — I would court their shade, and greet them kindly for their protection ; — I would cut my name upon them, and swear they were the loveliest trees throughout the desert ; if their leaves withered, I would teach myself to mourn : — and when they rejoiced, I would rejoice along with...
Seite 95 - Tis true," said I, correcting the proposition, "the Bastile is not an evil to be despised; but strip it of its towers, fill up the fosse, unbarricade the doors, call it simply a confinement, and suppose 'tis some tyrant of a distemper and not of a man which holds you in it, the evil vanishes, and you bear the other half without complaint." I was interrupted in the heyday of this soliloquy with a voice which I took to be of a child, which complained "it could not get out.
Seite 6 - Tis very true — and heaven be their resource" who have no other but the charity of the world ; the stock of which, I fear, is no way sufficient for the many great claims which are hourly made upon it.

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