The novels of Samuel Richardson, esq. To which is prefixed, a memoir of the life of the author [by sir W. Scott].

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Mrs Reeves to Miss Byron Mrs it Her aunt Eleanors joy on hearing of
34
Miss Byron to Miss Selby Sir Rowland observes had been with her friends at the
37
encouraged by her
45
regard for him
46
PAGE
50
Mr Reeves to George Selby Esq
58
Miss Byron to Miss Selby The visit to unhurt and to add to his chagrin is forced
61
Miss Byron to Miss Selby Retrospect
75
William Wilson to the Honourable
85
fen
95
Miss Byron for her daughter
108
the quarrel between Sir Hargrave and Sir mit to her an explicit answer whether
111
pearing to her grandmother she acquaints Lady this he accounts for in a note to Mr Selby
142
Miss Harriet Byron to Miss Lucy Selby LIV Mrs Shirley to Miss Byron _A letter
151
Returns in safety to the great joy of his friends 120 of the Grandison family farther continued
161
Miss Byron to Miss Selby After the inter LXIX Miss Byron to Miss Selby The same
188
Miss Byron to Miss Selby Miss Byron himself to a virtuous woman
195
Mrs Selby to Miss Byron Declares her dison declares to her brother the origin and pro
201
Grandison and Dr Bartlett
220
Sir Charles Grandison to Dr Bartlett
222
Dr Bartlett to Miss Byron History XCIII Sir Charles Grandison to Dr Bartlett
227
Miss Byron to Miss Selby Reflec
237
Sir Charles Grandison to Dr Bartlett woman with whom his lordship might suitably
259
Mr Deane to Mrs Selby He de and his sister
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1
278
Miss Byron to Miss Selby Sir Charles with her had seen through the thin veil that
309
copies of them to Lady Clementina the Count charmed with the great alteration in her beha
324
Miss Byron to Miss Selby Dr Bartletts sister Clementina
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Clementina previous to his departure She
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mily after his departure
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mentions his tender regard toward the two sons but at length accedes to his powerful entreaties
384
Sir Charles Grandison to Ďr Bartlett CLXII Sir Charles Grandison to Dr Bartlett
470
sation with the latter whom Sir Charles com fecting scene between Lord and Lady
479
Sir Charles Grandison to Dr Bartleti
486
happy with the Earl of D
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The Earl of
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CCXIÍ Miss Byron to Lady G Miss Byron their importunities in favour of the Count of Bel
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Sir Charles Grandison to Dr Bartlett
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Cíl Lady Gto Miss Byron Ideas of
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Miss Byron to Miss Selby A visit from subject of Sir Charles going to Italy and his
559
ing him
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posal from Sir Charles Miss Byrons pity and Charles as related by Mr Fenwick In the issue
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Sir Charles Grandison to Thomas Deane shall be ashamed of me c Mr Greville
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charities in this excursion Miss Byron relates Sir Charles delivers his sentiments in regard
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Lady
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an early day She adheres to her former opi JervoisAffectionate letter in answer to
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Miss Byron to Lady G Miss
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riage ceremony
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Lady G to Lady L Particu
667
pendence of females
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Miss Lucy Selby to Lady
683
Lady Grandison to Mrs Shirley
689
Lady Grandison to Mrs Shirley riage and is desirous of being presented to
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that subject Miss Jervois at her own request for her visit to Northamptonshire
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Lady Grandison to Ladies L CCXC Lady Grandison to Mrs Shirley Part
737
plains of ill health and the unwelcome perse lett The Count of Belvedere visits Sir Charles
740
Lady Grandison to Mrs Shirley between Lady Clementina and Mrs Beaumont
756
Lady Grandison to Mrs Shirley Lady Clementina a constant attendant on Lady
765
Lady Grandison to Lady G
778
and melancholy office of closing his eyes
783
CCLXXX
789

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Seite 185 - I am afraid my uncle will think himself justified by them on this occasion, when he asserts, that it is one of the most difficult things in the world to put a woman right, when she sets out wrong.
Seite 309 - But let concealment like a worm i' th' bud Feed on her damask cheek: she pin'd in thought, And with a green and yellow melancholy, She sat like Patience on a Monument, Smiling at grief.
Seite 353 - Look not upon me, because I am black, because the sun hath looked upon me: my mother's children were angry with me; they made me the keeper of the vineyards; but mine own vineyard have I not kept.
Seite 282 - Great souls by instinct to each other turn, Demand alliance, and in friendship burn ; A sudden friendship, while with stretch'd-out rays They meet each other, mingling blaze with blaze.
Seite 279 - Her virtue, and the conscience of her worth, That would be woo'd, and not unsought be won...
Seite 44 - I do not like thee, Dr. Fell; The reason why, I cannot tell But I don't like thee, Dr. Fell ell— I II.
Seite 482 - I should not account the debts incurred debts of honour; and should hardly scruple, had I not indirectly promised payment, by asking time for it, or had they refused to give it, to call in to my aid the laws of my country; and the rather, as the appeal to those laws would be a security to me against ever again being seen in such company. Adversity is the trial of principle: without it, a man hardly knows whether he is an honest man. Two things, my cousin in his present difficulties must guard against;...
Seite 166 - For what glory is it, if, when ye be buffeted for your faults, ye shall take it patiently? but if, when ye do well, and suffer for it, ye take it patiently, this is acceptable with God.
Seite 68 - I did nothing but dream of robbers, rescues, and murders: such an impression had the distress of this young lady made on my mind. They made me a poor report, proceeded she, of the night she had passed. And as I told you, she fainted away this morning, a little before you came, on her endeavouring to give me some account of her affecting story. Let me tell you, Mr. Reeves, I am as curious as you can be, to know the whole of what has befallen her. But her heart is tender and delicate: her spirits are...
Seite 36 - And take all lives of things from you; The world depend upon your eye, And when you frown upon it, die: Only our loves shall still survive, New worlds and natures to outlive, And, like to heralds...

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