...The Mohawk Valley and Lake Ontario

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Ainsworth, 1913 - 99 Seiten
 

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Seite 96 - THE thoughts are strange that crowd into my brain, While I look upward to thee. It would seem As if God poured thee from His hollow hand, And hung His bow upon thine awful front; And spoke in that loud voice, which seemed to him Who dwelt in Patmos for his Saviour's sake, The sound of many waters ; and had bade Thy flood to chronicle the ages back, And notch His centuries in the eternal rocks.
Seite 91 - Niagara, which is not above half a quarter of a League broad, but is wonderfully deep in some places. It is so rapid above this Descent, that it violently hurries down the wild Beasts while...
Seite 91 - Ontario and Erie, there is a vast and prodigious Cadence of Water, which falls down after a surprising and astonishing manner, insomuch that the Universe does not afford its parallel.
Seite 91 - The Waters which fall from this vast height, do foam and boil after the most hideous manner imaginable, making an outrageous Noise, more terrible than that of Thunder; for when the Wind blows from off the South, their dismal roaring may be heard above fifteen Leagues off.
Seite 10 - Such was the equipment of this ancient Indian-fighter, whose exploits date eleven years before the landing of the Puritans at Plymouth, and sixty-six years before King Philip's War. Each of the three Frenchmen was in a separate canoe, and, as it grew light, they kept themselves hidden, either by lying at the bottom, or covering themselves with an Indian robe. The canoes approached the shore, and all landed without opposi1 Champlain, in his rude drawing of the battle (ed.
Seite 11 - He did so, and, advancing before, his red compauions-in-arms, stood revealed to the astonished gaze of the Iroquois, who, beholding the warlike apparition in their path, stared in mute amazement. But his arquebuse was levelled ; the report startled the woods, a chief fell dead, and another by his side rolled among the bushes. Then there rose from the allies a yell, which, says Champlain, would •have drowned a thunder-clap, and the forest was full of whizzing arrows.
Seite 11 - The allies, growing anxious, called with loud cries for their champion, and opened their ranks that he might pass to the front. He did so, and, advancing before his red companions in arms, stood revealed to the gaze of the Iroquois, who, beholding the warlike apparition in their path, stared in mute amazement. " I looked at them," says Champlain,
Seite 13 - I will accompany you," rejoined the gallant young nobleman. In vain did Major Putnam attempt to dissuade him by saying — " My lord, if I am killed, the loss of my life will be of little consequence, but the preservation of yours is of infinite importance to this army." The only answer was, " Putnam, your life is as dear to you as mine is to me ; I am determined to go.
Seite 44 - General Van Rensselaer not being present at the moment, the letter was opened by one of his suite, and read substantially as follows:— " Sir: I send you by one of my runners, the child which he " will deliver, that you may know that whatever others may do, " /do not make war upon women and children. I am sorry to " say that I have those engaged with me in the service, who " are more savage than the savages themselves.
Seite 44 - Sir, — I send you, by one of my runners, the child, which he will deliver, that you may know that whatever others may do, I do not make war upon women and children. I am sorry to say that I have those engaged with me who are more savage than the savages themselves.

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