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Donors.

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No. in Catal.
H 14 a.

Female staffs.
14 b. )
I 2 a. Old navy amputating case.
1 36 a. A pair of retractors.
I 43 a.
1 43 b. )

Bell's artery forceps.
1 43 c. Luke's artery forceps.
1 57. Tourniquet.
1 49 a. Savigny's tourniquet.
K 23 a. Petit's elevator.
K 29 a. A lenticular.
K 37 d.

Varieties of Hey's saw.
K 37 e.
K 40 a.

Bone forceps.
K 45 a.
L 5 a. Nævus cautery.

15 a. Instrument for tightening ligatures. L 19 a.

Aneurism needles. L 19 b.) N 11 A. Luër's bullet-extractor. p 10 b. Model of a surgical bed. R 57–59. Native Bengalese lithotomy instruments. R 60-65. Native Bengalese ophthalmic instruments.

PERCY WORMALD, Esq.

HENRY BELLOT, Esq. PERCY WORMALD, Esq. PERCY WORMALD, Esq.

T. L. HUSSEY, Esq. PERCY WORMALD, Esq.

T. L. HUSSEY, Esq. PERCY WORMALD, Esq.

T. L. HUSSEY, Esq. PERCY WORMALD, Esq.

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PERCY WORMALD, Esq.

JABEZ HOGG, Esq. PERCY WORMALD, Esq. PERCY WORMALD, Esq.

T. M. STONE, Esq. W. H. B. WINCHESTER, Esq.

JABEZ HogG, Esq.
JABEZ HogG, Esq.

W. H. FLOWER,

Conservator.

June 29th, 1874.

REGULATIONS RELATING TO ADMISSION TO THE MUSEUM. The MUSEUM is open to the Members of the College, to the Trustees of the Hunterian Collection, and to Visitors introduced by them personally or by written orders, on the public days, which are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday in each week, from Twelve to Five o'clock from the 1st of March to the 31st of August, and from Twelve to Four o'clock from the 1st of October to the last day of February. During the month of September the Museum is closed.

The Museum is also open as above to Peers and Members of Parliament; to all Fellows and Licentiates of the Royal Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons in the United Kingdom ; to the Officers of the Public Service; to the Members of all the Learned and Scientific Bodies in the United Kingdom, and to persons introduced by them respectively; and to all learned and Scientific Foreigners.

The Secretary and Conservator exercise their discretion in the case of applications for admission from other persons.

Persons desirous of devoting especial study to particular departments of the Museum, may have access for that purpose on Fridays, from Twelve to Four in Winter, and from Twelve to Five in Summer, on making a written application to the President.

The Histological Collection is open to the inspection of Members of the College and Visitors introduced by them on Wednesdays, between the hours of Eleven and

Visitors are required to insert their names and residences in the Book provided

Five P.M.

for that purpose.

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The several Parts of the Catalogue of the Collection may be obtained from Mr. Hardwicke, 192 Piccadilly, at the following prices, viz. :

A.-NORMAL ANATOMY AND NATURAL HISTORY.

I.
Descriptive Catalogue of the Physiological Series of Comparative Anatomy, in- s. d.

cluding the Organs of Motion and Digestion. Edited by Professor Owen.
2nd edit., vol. i. 8vo, pp. 253 : 1852..

7 6
II. AND III.
Descriptive Catalogue of the Osteological Series. By Professor Owen. 2 vols.
4to, pp. 914: 1853

15 0

IV.
Descriptive and Illustrated Catalogue of the Histological Series. By Professor

Quekett. Vol. i. Elementary Tissues of Vegetables and Animals. 1850,
4to, pp. 305, 18 plates

15 0

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The same. By Professor Quekett. Vol. ii. Structure of the Skeleton of Vertebrate
Animals. 1855, 4to, pp. 248, 18 plates

15 0

VI.
Descriptive and Illustrated Catalogue of the Fossil Organic Remains of Mammalia

and Aves. By Professor Owen. 1845, 4to, pp. 391, 10 plates, illustrating
the Osteology of Glyptodon, Diprotodon, and Notothérium .

10 6

VII.
Descriptive Catalogue of the Fossil Organic Remains of Reptilia and Pisces. By
Professor Owen. 1854, 4to, pp. 184...

5 0
VIII.
Descriptive Catalogue of the Fossil Organic Remains of Invertebrata. By Pro-
fessor Morris and Professor Owen. 1856, 4to, pp. 260

5 0

IX.
Descriptive Catalogue of the Fossil Organic Remains of Plants. By Professor
Quekett and Professor Morris. 1859, 4to, pp. 94

3 6

X.
Catalogue of the Specimens of Vertebrate Natural History in Spirit. Edited by
Professor Quekett. 1859, 4to, pp. 147...

3 6
XI.
Catalogue of Plants and Invertebrate Animals in a Dried State. Edited by Pro-
fessor Quekett. 1860, 4to, pp. 514

10 6

XII.
Memoir on the Pearly Nautilus (Nautilus pompilius, Linn.), with illustrations of its

external form and internal structure. By Professor Owen. 1832, 4to,
pp. 63, 8 plates

5 0
XIII.
Catalogue of the Specimens of Entozoa. By Dr. Cobbold. 1866, 8vo, pp. 24

1866, 8vo, pp. 24 .... 10

B.-PATHOLOGY.
Descriptive Catalogues of the Pathological Specimens. By Messrs. Stanley and
Paget. 4to, 5 vols.

XIV.
Vol. I., 1846, pp. 144. General Pathology

36

XV.

Vol. II., 1847, pp. 255. Pathology of the Blood and Organs of Locomotion.. 5 0

XVI.
Vol. III., 1848, pp. 287. Pathology of the Organs of Digestion, Absorption,

and Circulation

5 0

XVII.
Vol. IV., 1849, pp. 350. Pathology of the Respiratory and Urinary Organs,

the Nervous System, and Organs of the Senses, the Generative Organs,
and the Mammary Glands .....

3 6

XVIII.
Vol. V., 1849, pp. 182. Specimens preserved in the Dry State

3 6

XIX.
Supplement I., 1863, pp. 115. Specimens added to the series since the pub-

lication of the above volumes. Edited by Mr. Flower .

3 6

XX.
Supplement II., 1864, pp. 96. Additional Specimens of Injuries and Diseases

of the Eye. By Mr. C. Bader

5 0

XXI., XXII., AND XXIII.
Descriptive and Illustrated Catalogue of the Calculi and other Animal Concretions.

By Mr. T. Taylor.
Part I., 1842, pp. 138, 12 plates. Human Urinary Calculi
Part II., 1845, pp. 128, 5 plates. Calculi from the Biliary Organs, Stomach,

and Intestines of Man; Calculi from the Lower Animals, &c. Supplement, 1871, pp. 87

5 0

4 0 2 6

XXIV. Descriptive Catalogue of the Dermatological Specimens, 1870. By Professor Wilson 2 0

XXV.
Descriptive Catalogue of the Teratological Series. 8vo, pp. 110, 1872, By Mr.

B. T. Lowne..

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THE LIBRARY.

The formation of a regular Library may be said to have commenced in the year 1801, at which time and in succeeding years presentations and bequests of books, often in considerable numbers, were made to the College—the principal donors being Dr. Baillie, Sir Everard Home, Sir Charles Blicke, the widow of Mr. Sharp, Sir Ludford Harvey, Dr. Fleming, Mr. Cotton, and Mr. Long. The Court of Assistants also directed from time to time the expenditure of small sums of money for the purchase of books, and eventually voted a sum of £100 per annum for this purpose. Sir Charles Blicke, in the year 1816, invested the sum of £300, the proceeds of which sum were to be devoted to the same object. Some of the purchases thus made were considerable, as in the cases of the Libraries of Mr. Pitt, Mr. St. Andre, and Sir Anthony Carlisle, and books of importance were added at the recommendation of the Conservator of the Museum and others. In this way a Library of considerable value was gradually accumulated, but it was only accessible to a limited number of persons. In 1827 active steps were taken to render it more generally useful, and with this object catalogues and extensive lists of desirable acquisitions were ordered to be prepared. Large sums of money were also expended during this and the ensuing two years, amounting in the aggregate to nearly ££000. A Librarian was appointed, and in 1828 the Library, then containing 10,500 volumes, was thrown open to members of the College, and all other persons engaged in the pursuit of natural science were freely admitted. This large collection, thus opened, offered great facilities to the studious. By means of extensive additions, the collection was well nigh complete in works on Medicine and Surgery, both domestic and foreign, whilst it was also very rich in publications relating

to the accessory sciences. The transactions of Academies and Societies, and the collection of periodical publications in general, owing to their completeness, and the difficulty with which access can be obtained to this class of literature elsewhere than in large libraries, formed a valuable feature. The maintenance of the Library from that time to the present has involved a very cousiderable expenditure of the funds of the College. It has been the object of those to whose care it has been confided to ensure the completeness and excellence of the collection, and great facilities of reference have been provided by the preparation of additional catalogues and indexes of subjects. During the last year there have been added to the Library 423 volumes (comprising 98 new works) and 122 tracts, pamphlets, essays, reports, and theses. The entire collection now contains 34,754 volumes, 14,037 works, and 37,367 tracts, pamphlets, essays, reports, and theses.

The following is a list of the donations that have been presented to the Library during the year 1873–74, viz.

Dr. Grimshaw. The Influence of Digitalis on the Weak Heart of Typhus Fever.

Dr. Fayrer. European Child-Life in Bengal; and the Nature and Physiological Action of the Poison of Indian Venomous Snakes, by Drs. Brunton and Fayrer.

L'Académie des Sciences de Paris. Comptes Rendus, 1873–74.

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