Confessions of a Young Novelist

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Harvard University Press, 2011 - 231 Seiten
2 Rezensionen

Umberto Eco published his first novel, The Name of the Rose, in 1980, when he was nearly fifty. In these “confessions,” the author, now in his late seventies, looks back on his long career as a theorist and his more recent work as a novelist, and explores their fruitful conjunction.

He begins by exploring the boundary between fiction and nonfiction—playfully, seriously, brilliantly roaming across this frontier. Good nonfiction, he believes, is crafted like a whodunnit, and a skilled novelist builds precisely detailed worlds through observation and research. Taking us on a tour of his own creative method, Eco recalls how he designed his fictional realms. He began with specific images, made choices of period, location, and voice, composed stories that would appeal to both sophisticated and popular readers. The blending of the real and the fictive extends to the inhabitants of such invented worlds. Why are we moved to tears by a character's plight? In what sense do Anna Karenina, Gregor Samsa, and Leopold Bloom “exist”?

At once a medievalist, philosopher, and scholar of modern literature, Eco astonishes above all when he considers the pleasures of enumeration. He shows that the humble list, the potentially endless series, enables us to glimpse the infinite and approach the ineffable. This “young novelist” is a master who has wise things to impart about the art of fiction and the power of words.

 

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LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - AltheaAnn - LibraryThing

A short collection of essays/lectures by Eco. "Writing from Left to Right" describes Eco's decision to write novels, and his writing process. "Author, Text and Interpreters" talks about intentionality ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - Laura400 - LibraryThing

This is brief, illuminating and generally interesting to read. For me, the last part was unnecessary, as it was a regurgitation of his "An Infinity of Lists" without the, for me, saving grace of the examples from art history. But the book is worth reading for the first three chapters. Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

1 Writing from Left to Right
1
2 Author Text and Interpreters
33
3 Some Remarks on Fictional Characters
69
4 My Lists
121
Notes
207
Index
221
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (2011)

Umberto Eco was born in Alessandria, Italy on January 5, 1932. He received a doctorate of philosophy from the University of Turin in 1954. His first book, Il Problema Estetico in San Tommaso, was an extension of his doctoral thesis on St. Thomas Aquinas and was published in 1956. His first novel, The Name of the Rose, was published in 1980 and won the Premio Strega and the Premio Anghiar awards in 1981. In 1986, it was adapted into a movie starring Sean Connery. His other works include Foucault's Pendulum, The Island of the Day Before, Baudolino, The Prague Cemetery, and Numero Zero. He also wrote children's books and more than 20 nonfiction books including Serendipities: Language and Lunacy. He taught philosophy and then semiotics at the University of Bologna. He also wrote weekly columns on popular culture and politics for L'Espresso. He died from cancer on February 19, 2016 at the age of 84.

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