A Reply to the Letter of Marcus Morton, Late Governor of Massachusetts, on the Rhode-Island Question. By One of the Rhode-Island People

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1842 - 32 Seiten
 

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Seite 16 - Governor and company, and their successors; and from time to time to make, ordain, constitute or repeal such laws, statutes, orders and ordinances, forms and ceremonies of government and magistracy as to them shall seem meet for the good and welfare of the said company, and for the government and ordering of the lands and hereditaments, hereinafter mentioned to be granted, and of the people that do, or at any time hereafter shall inhabit or be within the same; so as such laws, ordinances and constitutions,...
Seite 21 - Why may not illicit combinations for purposes of violence, be formed as well by a majority of a state, especially a small state, as by a majority of a county, or a district of the same state ; and if the authority of the state ought in the latter case to protect the local magistracy, ought not the federal authority in the former to support the state authority?
Seite 21 - May it not happen, in fine, that the minority of citizens may become a majority of persons, by the accession of alien residents, of a casual concourse of adventurers, or of those whom the constitution of the State has not admitted to the rights of suffrage...
Seite 15 - ... so as such laws, ordinances and constitutions, so made, be not contrary and repugnant unto, but, as near as may be, agreeable to the laws of this our realm of England, considering the nature and constitution of the place and people there...
Seite 15 - Until the revolution in 1776, it was governed by the charter granted by Charles II. in the fifteenth year of his reign. That charter has ever since continued in its general provisions to regulate the exercise and distribution of the powers of government. It has never been formally abrogated by the people ; and, except so far as it has been modified to meet the exigencies of the revolution, may be considered as now a fundamental law. By this charter the power to make laws is granted to the general...
Seite 18 - That elections of members to serve as representatives of the people, in assembly, ought to be free ; and that all men, having sufficient evidence of permanent common interest with, and attachment to, the community, have the right of suffrage...
Seite 15 - Rhode Island is the only state in the union which has not a written constitution of government, containing its fundamental laws and institutions. Until the revolution in 1776, it was governed by the charter granted by Charles II. in the fifteenth year of his reign. That charter has ever since continued in its general provisions to regulate the exercise and distribution of the powers of government. It has never been formally abrogated by the people ; and, except so far as it has been modified to meet...
Seite 16 - The suggestion of the full unqualified extension of the principle of representation may therefore be justly attributed to the example of Rhode Island and Connecticut, which, when converted into States, found it unnecessary to alter the nature of their governments, and continued the same forms in all respects except the nominal recognition of the king's authority till 1818, when Connecticut made some minor changes and adopted a formal Constitution. Rhode Island, however, is still satisfied with the...
Seite 16 - Company, and their successors ; and from time to time, to make, ordain, constitute or repeal, such laws, statutes, orders and ordinances, forms aud ceremonies of government and magistracy, as to them shall seem meet, for the good and welfare of the said Company, and for the government and ordering of the lands and hereditaments, hereinafter mentioned to be granted, and of the people that do, or at any time hereafter shall, inhabit or be within...
Seite 21 - Is it true, that force and right are necessarily on the same side in republican Governments ? May not the minor party possess such a superiority of pecuniary resources, of military talents and experience, or of secret...

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