Transactions, Band 26

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"List of members of the American Medical Association, by states, from its formation in 1846 to and including 1880. Compiled from the annual published minutes. By J. M. Toner, M.D.": 131 p. at end of v. 31.
 

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Seite 502 - But no one can be considered as a regular practitioner or a fit associate in consultation, whose practice is based on an exclusive dogma, to the rejection of the accumulated experience of the profession, and of the aids actually furnished by anatomy, physiology, pathology and organic chemistry.
Seite 478 - Each State, county, and district medical society, entitled to representation, shall have the privilege of sending to the Association one delegate for every ten of its regular resident members, and one for every additional fraction of more than half that number; Provided, however, that the number of...
Seite 506 - Some general rules should be adopted by the faculty, in every town or district, relative to pecuniary acknowledgments from their patients; and it should be deemed a point of honor to adhere to these rules with as much uniformity as varying circumstances will admit.
Seite 505 - ... patient who is under the regular direction of another physician, in consequence of some sudden change or aggravation of symptoms. The conduct to be pursued on such an occasion is to give advice adapted to present circumstances...
Seite 504 - ... the practitioner in attendance; the practice of the latter, if necessary, should be justified as far as it can be, consistently with a conscientious regard for truth, and no hint or insinuation should be thrown out which could impair the confidence reposed in him. or affect his reputation. The consulting physician should also carefully refrain from any of those extraordinary attentions or assiduities which are too often practised by the dishonest for the base purpose of gaining applause, or ingratiating...
Seite 496 - The opportunity which a physician not unfrequently enjoys of promoting and strengthening the good resolutions of his patients, suffering under the consequences of vicious conduct, ought never to be neglected.
Seite 497 - ... 3. Patients should prefer a physician whose habits of life are regular, and who is not devoted to company, pleasure, or to any pursuit incompatible with his professional obligations. A patient should, also, confide the care of himself and family, as much as possible, to one physician : for a medical man who has become acquainted with the peculiarities of constitution, habits, and predispositions of those he attends, is more likely to be successful in hia treatment than one who does not possess...
Seite 500 - It is also incumbent upon the faculty to be temperate in all things, for the practice of physic requires the unremitting exercise of a clear and vigorous understanding; and, on emergencies, for which no professional man should be unprepared, a steady hand, an acute eye, and an unclouded head may be essential to the well-being, and even to the life, of a fellow-creature. § 3. It is derogatory to the dignity of the profession to resort to public advertisements, or private cards, or handbills, inviting...
Seite 478 - ... County and District Medical Society entitled to representation, shall have the privilege of sending to the Association one delegate for every ten of its regular resident members, and one for every additional fraction of more than half that number. Provided, however, that the number of delegates for any particular State, Territory, county, city or town, shall not exceed the ratio of one in ten of the resident physicians who may have signed the Code of Ethics of the Association.
Seite 496 - This office, however, is so peculiarly alarming when executed by him, that it ought to be declined whenever it can be assigned to any other person of sufficient judgment and delicacy. For the physician should be the minister of hope and comfort to the sick ; that, by such cordials to the drooping spirit, he may smooth the bed of death, revive expiring life, and counteract the depressing influence of those maladies which often disturb the tranquillity of the most resigned in their last moments. The...

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