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A TRE A TISE

ON

THE LAW AND PRACTICE

RELATING TO

LETTERS PATENT FOR INVENTIONS.

BY

JOHN PAXTON NORMAN, ESQ., M. A.,

OF THE INNER TEMPLE, BARRISTER-AT-LAW.

*

“The end of our foundation is the enlarging of the bounds of human empire to.
the effecting of all things possible."-LORD Bacon, New Atlantis.

LONDON:
BUTTERWORTHS, 7, FLEET STREET,
Law Booksellers and Publishers in ordinary to Her Majesty.

PRINTED BY cox (BROTHERS) AND WYMAN, GREAT QUEEN STREET,

LINCOLN'S-INN FIELDS.

TO

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE

ROBERT MONSEY BARON CRANWORTH,

LORD HIGH CHANCELLOR OF GREAT BRITAIN, ETC. ETC.

ONE OF HER MAJESTY'S COMMISSIONERS OF PATENTS FOR INVENTIONS,

THIS LITTLE WORK

RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED

INTRODUCTION.

The great system of rewards to inventors, popularly known as the Law of Patents, was originally instituted in England. It has been adopted into the legislation of almost all civilized countries.

Society, grateful to him who adds to its stock of practical knowledge, confers on him a reward which is measured by the substantial benefit it receives, by allowing him for a limited time the sole right to exercise the art he has taught it. It secures to the man of genius a share of the benefits derived from his conquests in the world of art,-conquests inade not for himself alone, but for all mankind.

In a long course of years many abuses had grown up, which recent legislation has removed. The prizes held out have been brought more within the reach of the poorer class of inventors.

One cannot but be sanguine in hoping that the community is likely to derive great benefit from the new objects and motives presented to the minds of our artisans. A sense of its tangible, intelligible advantages will urge them to the education of themselves and their children. They will feel and understand that he who brings to the performance of his work an informed mind and an observant spirit, who strives earnestly to study and comprehend the principles as well as

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