Memoir of the Life of Richard Henry Lee, and His Correspondence with the Most Distinguished Men in America and Europe: Illustrative of Their Characters, and of the Events of the American Revolution, Band 2

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H.C. Carey and I. Lea, 1825
 

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Seite 76 - It is the most transcendent privilege which any subject can enjoy or wish for, that he cannot be affected either in his property, his liberty, or his person, but by the unanimous consent of twelve of his neighbors and equals.
Seite 9 - His strength will increase as a snowball by rolling, and faster, if some expedient cannot be hit upon to convince the slaves and servants of the impotency of his designs.
Seite 32 - There is nothing which binds one country or one State to another but interest. Without this cement the western inhabitants, who more than probably will be composed in a great degree of foreigners, can have no predilection for us, and a commercial connexion is the only tie we can have upon them.
Seite 79 - ... that the English is the only nation in the world where political or civil liberty is the direct end of its constitution.
Seite 16 - The management of this matter, give me leave to add, Sir, is a delicate point ; for although no one will dispute the right of Congress to make appointments, every person will assume the privilege of judging of the propriety of them ; and good policy, in my opinion, forbids the disgusting of a whole corps to gratify the pride of an individual ; for it is by the zeal and activity of our own people, that the cause must be supported, and not by a few hungry adventurers.
Seite 70 - Yet there is no restraint in form of a bill of rights, to secure (what Doctor Blackstone calls) that residuum of human rights, which is not intended to be given up to society, and which indeed is not necessary to be given for any good social purpose.— The rights of conscience, the freedom of the press, and the trial by jury are at mercy.
Seite 126 - I confess, as I enter the Building I stumble at the Threshold. (I meet with a National Government, instead of a Federal Union of Sovereign States. I am not able to conceive why the Wisdom of the Convention led them to give the Preference to the former before the latter. If the several States in the Union are to become one entire Nation, under one Legislature, the Powers of which shall extend to every Subject of Legislation, and its Laws be supreme & controul the whole,. the Idea of Sovereignty in...
Seite 12 - I am anxious to know whether General Arnold's nonpromotion was owing to accident or design ; and the cause of it. Surely a more active, a more spirited, and sensible officer, fills no department in your army. Not seeing him, then, in the list of major-generals, and no mention made of him, has given me uneasiness; as it is not to be presumed, being the oldest brigadier, that he will continue in service under such a slight.
Seite 185 - In a virtuous government, and more , especially in times like these, public offices are, what they should be, burthens to those appointed to them, which it would be wrong to decline, though foreseen to bring with them intense labour, and great private loss.

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