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OR GENERAL REPOSITORY OF

THE PROPER
W
ANNUAL REGISTER,
HISTORY,

POLITICS,
LITERATURE, ,

AND

For the YEAR 1812.

OF THE

SOCI

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TO WHICH IS PREFIXED

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The HISTORY of KNOWLEDGE, LEARNING, TASH
SCIENCE, in Great Britain, during the Reign of GEORGR III.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR JOHN STOCKDALE,

PICCADILLY.

181.
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We may safely assert, that the public interest was never excited so anxiously, permanently, or generally, as by the domestic and foreign events and transactions of the year 1812. At home the disturbances which agitated our manufacturing districts, for some time created great alarm and apprehension: it was not merely the mystery in which they were involved, the extent of country over which they spread, or the length of time during which they continued, that gave rise to this alarm and apprehension; but the peculiar character which they assumed, the system with which they were conducted, and the suspicion that they originated from more serious causes than want of employment and the pressure of the times, and aimed at objects connected with the stability of Government and the peace of the Country. Happily they subsided, by a judicious employment, on the part of Ministry, of patient forbearance, and well-applied vigour.

Closely connected with these disturbances, the discussions and evidence relative to the Repeal of the “ Orders in Council” may be viewed; it was proved, almost to the conviction, certainly to the silencing of the advocates for these Orders, that they had in their action rebounded on ourselves, with at least as much force as they had acted on the enemy: this circumstance, joined to the expectation, that by their repeal America would be

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propitiated, and our trade revived, induced. Ministers to give a reluctant consent to this measure; but it came too late, and it was so evidently the result of a regard to our own interest, rather than to the interests or rights of neutral nations, that America was not reconciled. A war between the two countries has taken place, wbichi hitherto þas exhibited nothing worthy of police, except the circumstance of our new enemy equalling us in maritime courage, experience, and skill, and exhibiting, in their land operations, a total want of every quality that can forin a general or a soldier.

But the most remarkable events in our domestic history are conpected with the assassination of Mr. Perceval, a circumstance in itself unparal leled in the British annals. In consequence of his death, negotiations were set on foot for the formation of a new Ministry, the progress and sesult of which ought to be considered with great attention by all, who wish to obtain a clear and perfect insight into the talents, the character, and the principles of the various parties that exist among our public 'men.

When all the circumstances attending this negotiation are consi, dered, it is apprehended, that few will be at a loss to comprehend the character of the Prince Regent; of the leaders of the Whigs; of Lord Wellesley, and Mr. Canning; of Lord Moira, or of those who constitute the present Ministry; and we are afraid that neither the talents nor the patriotism of those to whom the country naturally looks up, in this, arduous crisis, will appear to great advantage.

In the Peninsular war, the fame of the British arms was extended and increased: whatever may

be

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