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ACCOUNTS RELATING TO PROSECUTIONS FOR FORGING BANK OF

ENGLAND NOTES :- viz.

1.-An Account of the Number of Persons prosecuted for Forging Notes of the

Bank of England, and for uttering or possessing such Notes knowing them to be forged; from the 1st of January 1816, to the 25th of February 1818; distinguishing the Years, and the Number convicted and acquitted of such Offences respectively,

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2.-An Account of the Number of Persons prosecuted for Forging Notes of the

Governor and Company of the Bank of England, and for uttering such Notes knowing them to be forged; during the 14 Years preceding the Suspension of Cash Payments by the Bank in February 1797, distinguishing the Years.

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3.-An Account of the Number of Persons prosecuted for Forging Notes of the

Governor and Company of the Bank of England, and for knowingly nttering or possessing such Forged Notes, knowing them to be forged, since the Suspension of Cash Payments by the Bank in February 1797, to the 25th of February 1818; distinguishing the Years, and the Numbers Convicted and Acquitted,

Year.

Capital
Convictions.

Convictions
for having forged Bank

Notes in possession.

Acquittals. Total Number

Prosecuted.

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1797.
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812.
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817

1818
to 25 Feb,

16

9 23 10

5 26 9 5 7 20

14

9 24 23 29 16 19 26 49 39 51 84 95

2 16 3 9 12 7 3 5 16 15 1

2 12 15 44 54 63

9 25 23 10 45 34 68 29 33 64 65 47 63 120 142 26

32

4

21

4.--An Account of the total Number of Forged Bank Notes, discovered by the Bank to

have been Forged, by presentation for payment, or otherwise, from 1st January 1812 to 10th April 1818; distinguishing each Year, and also distinguishing the Number of Notes of £.1, of £.2, 2.5, of £.10, of £.20, and above £.20, in Value.

Years.

Years.

Number of

Notes

Total Notes of Notes of Notes of Notes of Notes of Notes of above Number £.1. £.2

£.5 £.10. L.15. £.20. £.20.

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FRENCH INDEMNITY. An Account of all Sums received by Great Britain, since the 20th November, 1815,

as Portions of the Indemnity to be paid by France, by the Treaty of that date, specifying the mode in which such Sums have been applied, and what part of them has been paid into the Exchequer.

Under the Convention concluded in conformity to the 4th Article of the principal Treaty, France was to pay Great Britain 125,000,000 francs, at the periods hereafter specified; viz.

Francs.

Francs
In the Year. 1816. 15,000,000

1817 27,500,000
1818 27,500,000
1819 27,500,000
1820 27,500,000

125,000,000

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In pursuance of this Convention, the following Sums have been actually paid; viz. 1815. December 32 .

615,000 1816. January. 2

749,000 8

3,636,000 cents. April

1,666,666 66 August 1

8,333,333 34

15,000,000 November 28

9,166,666 66 1817. April .. 7

458,000 14

524,000

524,000 28

524,000 May 5

524,000 12

524,000 15

524,000 26

524,000 June . . 2

457,000 October 24

4,583,666 November10

4,583,000 30 4,583,000

27,500,000 27

9,166,666 66 1818. March 26

9,166,666 66

cents.

18,333,335 . 32 An Agreement was subsequently made with France, for postponing the payment of one half the quadremetre becoming due from 1 April to 31 July 1817, to the 20 October 1817 ; and for postponing the whole of the quadremetre becoming due from the 1 August to the 30 November 1817, to the 10 and 30 November 1817 ; and Interest was charged to France for such postponement, amounting to fs. 133,106.52 ; and which was paid as follows ; viz.

francs cents 1817. October 27

67,106 . 52 November 13

44,000 December 28.

22,000

133,106 52

66

68

Making the total received from France to the 1 May 1818.fs. 60,966,439 · 84

This Sum has been applied as follows :

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Retained by the British Commissioner, on account of the

Expenses of his Establishment
Paid into the Military Chest in France towards the Expenses of

the Army of Occupation, over and above the Sums received

from France on account of that Army Paid to his Grace the Duke of Wellington, in Paris, towards the

Sum of 25,000,000 francs, granted by Parliament as Prize

Money to the Troops under his Grace's command.
Remitted to England, and which produced the Sum of
£.1,406,916 11 11 sterling

TOTAL applied
Remaining in the Indemnity Chest in Paris, in Mandats

becoming due between the 1 May and 1 August

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TOTAL Amount received from France fs. 60,966,439

84

The Sum of £.1,406,916 11 11 sterling, the Proceeds

of the f.31,886,833. 34 remitted from France, as
above stated, was applied as follows :

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Towards completing the Grant of the Sum of 25,000,000

francs, as Prize Money to the Army under the command of
his Grace the Duke of Wellington
To the Paymaster General of the Forces, in re-payment of
Sums advanced and paid out of the Extraordinaries of the
Army in England, for the use of the Troops serving in

France in 1816 and 1817
To the Paymaster General of the Forces, in

re-payment of Sums advanced and paid in England, out of the Sums granted for the Ordinary Service of the Army, on account of the Troops serving in France in 1816 and 1817

104,579 0 0

595,074 16

£.1,406,916 11 11

Whitehalls Pressure Chambers, }

C. ARBUTHNOT.

CHARACTERS,

CHARACTERS.

LATE LORD STANHOPE.

CH

BIOGRAPHICAL ACCOUNT OF THE the society of Arts and Sciences

at Stockholm, for the best essay

on the structure of the penduHARLES Stanhope, third lum.

Earl , born in On his return to England, he the year 1753. His grandfather, appeared to inherit from his and his father, were both of them parents a set of political opinions, warmly attached to the Whig which would doubtless. be fosparty, and on all occasions con- tered by his long abode at Gestantly supported the liberal side neva; and in after life, he was of all public questions. The not unfrequently regarded as subject of this memoir was sent carrying his notions of liberty to very young, to. Eton College, an extravagant length. His hofrom which he was removed at nesty and integrity, however, the age of ten, for the purpose of were unquestionable ; and it canaccompanying his father's family not be doubted, that although to Geneva, in which place the mistaken in his judgment, he elder son soon died. Charles was acted from conviction. His first now left to assume the title of appearance in the political world Viscount Mahon; and in this was as a candidate for Westminstate he passed ten years in that ster, in which, however, he did city, where his education was not succeed : he was afterwards chiefly conducted under the in- returned for the borough of Wyspection of M. le Sage, well combe, and continued a member known as the author of a theory of the lower House, till the death of gravity, and of various tracts of his father in 1786, gave him a connected with mineralogy, che. seat as a Peer of the realm, mistry, and other departments of Although Lord Stanhope was natural philosophy. During the chiefly known by his contempoyoung nobleman's residence in raries as a politician, it is rather Switzerland, he made a consi- as

as a philosopher, that he has derable progress in scientific pure made himself generally known to suits; and while still resident in the world. Of his works which Geneva, he obtained a prize from relate to a strictly scientific ob. Vol. LX.

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