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prosecution more than necessity the motion, not as a criterion by required. As to what had been which to judge of the conduct of said relative to the officers in the the court-martial, but to try the present case not being voluntary conduct of the Horse-guards and prosecutors, he could not suppose the Crown. He could not hope, that they had contemplated any by the production of the papers, other course after the letter in that the officers could have any which the whole proceeding origi. military redress; but it was of the nated. It had been pleaded, that last importance that they should the letter signed by the officers have them, in order to lay the was not designed to be produced; foundation for some proceedings but it was destructive of the ho- on the part of the House, that nour and character of Col. Quen- might prevent the recurrence of tin, and he had a full right to de- such a grievance. mand its production. The hon, Mr.IVellesley Polespoke strongly gentleman concluded by showing against the motion, as highly inthe grounds on which he opposed jurious to the discipline of the the motion. Unless there was army. some urgent necessity to justify Mr. Brand adverted to a prethe production of such papers as cedent of interference by the those desired, he could conceive House of Commons, with the sennothing more injurious to the ser- tence of a court-martial, which vice, or more calculated to inca- took place in the administration of pacitate such courts for perform- Mr. Pelham, when the House ing their functions. In some declared the sentence partial, ille. cases that had occurred there were gal, and unjust. important political questions in. After some other members bad volved in the consideration, but it spoken on the occasion, and Col. could never be advantageous to Palmer bad briefly replied, the convert the House of Commons House divided, For the motion into a court of ordinary appeal on 37; Against it 144: Majority such matters.

107. Mr. Tierney said, that he did On Nov. 21st, Mr Peele moved not wish to dispute the sentence in the House of Commons, the of the court-martial, or to cast an second reading of a bill for amendimputation on their conduct; but ing the Irish Peace-Preservation the proceedings, if produced, would Act. shew, that no officer could be Mr. J. P. Grant said, he un. exempt from censure, however derstood that the right hon. geojust his motives, or exemplary histleman had declared, that the mea. conduct, who should attack a man sures carried in the last session bad who was a favourite. (This term been completely successful, for occasioned a cry of “ hear" from that the Insurrection bill had never the ministerial side of the House, been put in force at all; and the re-echoed by the opposite side). other bill only in one instance. Mr. T. went on with a variety of For his part, he had seen or heard remarks tending to confirm his as- nothing to change his opinion of sertion, and said he should support the impolicy and impropriety of

suspeuding

the prosecutor on that occasion. reading one half of the proceedings. He began with asserting that the He was himself clearly of opinion, observation made by the courte that unless it was the intention to martial that “ there appears to attack the integrity of the court. have existed such a want of co. martial, there existed not the operation among the officers of the slightest foundation for the motion. regiment, as to render the duties The court was a competent triof the commanding officer much bunal. The members stood high more arduous than they otherwise in public opinion, and it was suffi. would have been," was not found. cient to read the list to remove ed on fact. He then proceeded' every suspicion of their being acto comment on the charges which tuated by improper influence. The had been produced against Colonel hon. gentleman then adverted to Quentin, and the evidence in sup- various particulars of the charge. port of them, in doing which, he He admitted that the discipline of quoted from the reply he had made the regiment was in a very bad before the court martial to the de- state under Col. Quentin's comfence set up by Colonel Quentin. mand, and that under the previous He concluded with reading that command of Col. Robarts and part of the sentence of the court the hon, mover, the discipline was martial, which, in his opinion, in excellent ; but his reply was, that juriously reflected upon the cha- all this was known to the duke of racters of those in whose behalf he Wellington, who applied the was now imploring the intercession proper remedy; and the court. of the House ; and with respect to martial, deeming all the imputa. himself, he said he had never wish- tions upon Col. Quentin's courage ed to become the prosecutor of unfounded, and holding that for Colonel Quentin, but had been die the rest he had received a suffin rected to undertake that task, not cient censure, had come to the only by the authority of the Com- judgment now under consideration. mander in chief, but by command He then adduced facts to justify of the Prince Regent himself. In the court in its remark on the fine, he moved for “ An humble want of co-operation among the address to his Royal Highness, Officers. He also adverted to the that he would graciously be pleased case of Col. Ross of the 85th to direct the proceedings of the regiment, who having been found general Court-partial held on guilty of improperly employing Colonel Quentin to be laid before inen on duty, the captains by them."

whom the charge was preferred Mr. Manners Sution, (Judge were dismissed, and Col. Ross, in Advocate) said, that the course consequence of having himself which the hon. Inover had pursued previously instigated trivial prosewas the most extraordinary he had cutions, was directed to retire, ever witnessed in parliament. The selling his commission : tbe officers motion bad been deferred in order in this case might feel aggrieved, to give time for the production of but it was for an impartial witness the evidence, and he now ex to decide, whether any thing had pected to convince the House by taken place in the result of the

prosecution

prosecution more than necessity the motion, not as a criterion by required. As to what had been which to judge of the conduct of said relative to the officers in the the court-martial, but to try the present case not being voluntary conduct of the Horse-guards and prosecutors, he could not suppose the Crown. He could not hope, that they had contemplated any by the production of the papers, other course after the letter in that the officers could have any which the whole proceeding origi. military redress; but it was of the nated. It had been pleaded, that last importance that they should the letter signed by the officers have them, in order to lay the was not designed to be produced ; foundation for some proceedings but it was destructive of the ho- on the part of the House, that nour and character of Col. Quen- might prevent the recurrence of tio, and he had a full right to de- such a grievance. mand its production. The hon, Mr. Wellesley Polespoke strongly gentleman concluded by slowing against the motion, as highly inthe grounds on which he opposed jurious to the discipline of the the motion. Unless there was army. some urgent necessity to justify Mr. Brand adverted to a prethe production of such papers as cedent of interference by the those desired, he could conceive House of Commons, with the sen. nothing more injurious to the ser- tence of a court-martial, which vice, or more calculated to inca- took place in the administration of pacitate such courts for perform. Mr. Pelham, when the House ing their functions. In some declared the sentence partial, ille. cases that had occurred there were gal, and unjust. important political guestions in. After some other members had volved in the consideration, but it spoken on the occasion, and Col. could never be advantageous to Palmer bad briefly replied, the convert the House of Commons House divided, For the motion into a court of ordinary appeal on 37 ; Against it 144: Majority such matters.

107. Mr. Tierney said, that he did On Nov, 21st, Mr Peele moved not wish to dispute the sentence in the House of Commons, the of the court-martial, or to cast an second reading of a bill for amend. imputation on their conduct; buting the Irish Peace-Prese rvation the proceedings, if produced, would Act. shew, that no officer could be Mr. J. P. Grant said, he un. exempt from censure, however derstood that the right hon. geojust his motives, or exemplary his tleman had declared, that the mea. conduct, who should attack a mansures carried in the last session bad who was a favourite. (This term been completely successful, for occasioned a cry of “ hear" from that the Insurrection bill bad never the ministerial side of the House, been put in force at all; and the re-echoed by the opposite side). other bill only in one instance, Mr. T. went on with a variety of For his part, he bad seen or beard remarks tending to confirm his as nothing to change his opinion of sertion, and said he should support the impolicy and impropriety of

suspeuding

CHAPTER XIX.

Domestic Occurrences.-His Majesty's State.-General tranquillity of

Great Britain.-Disturbed State of Ireland.- Proceedings of the Irish Roman Catholics.- Princess of Wales.- Princess Charlotte of Wales.- Attempt to alter the Corn Laws.- Commercial Prospects.

THE official reports respecting coalescence between the superior

1 bis Majesty's state during and inferior ranks, marked by the present year bave almost uni- bounty in the former, and decency formly been, that bis bodily health in the latter. has remained unimpaired, and his In the sister island, however, mental condition has been com- the year has been distinguished by posed and tranquil, but without a very different state of things. the least improvement in his intel- Such a spirit of outrage and law. lectual faculties. It cannot be less violence was inanifested in doubted that the case is now abso. several of the Irish countries, that lutely decided, and that the regen- it was thought necessary to arm ry is to all intents and purposes the magistracy with extraordinary constituted a reign.

powers for the preservation of the This year, like the last, has been public peace; and in our narrative little disturbed by commotions in of parliamentary proceedings will any part of the island of Great be found the particulars of tbc Britain ; for a few outrages com- measures adopted on this occasion, mitted by the frame-breakers in as well as the discussions with Nottinghamshire scarcely deserve which they were attended. A notice. It is even remarkable more full and unbiassed account of how little the vast assemblages of these disorders and their causes people in the metropolis and other was however thought to have been towns, drawn together by the fes- given in a celebrated charge from tivities and unusual objects of cu.. Judge Fletcher, for which reason riosity which the time has afford. we have presented it entire to our ed, have tended to excite a riotous readers. disposition in the populace; and if It was observed, in relating the the demeanor of the mob has proceedings of the Irish Roman sometimes been marked with rude Catholics during the last year, familiarity towards the illustrious that a spirit of disunion had mani. visitants, it never put on the ap- fested itself in that body which pearance of ill humour or mis- had operated unfavourably upon chievous propensity. The rejoic. the efforts towards an improveings on account of the peace were ment of their situation; and the hearty and general, and frequent- same remark will apply to the prely offered very pleasing displays of sent year. In the beginning of

May

time, and passed. It received the the topics waiting for parliamenroyal assent at the close of the tary consideration, he was fully session

aware of their importance, but the On December 2d. The Earl of internal concerns of the empire Liverpool moved an adjournment were too closely connected with of the House of Lords to the oth the external, to be disposed of of February next.

without reference to each other. Lord Grenville said, that to this On some of the points alluded to motion he must decidedly object by the noble lord he thought it Their Lordships had been called best to keep silence; but with together in times when legislative respect to the charge made relative deliberation was more than usually to the American negociation, their necessary. There was bardly a lordships might be assured, that branch of the public administra- aggrandisement on tbe part of this tion that did not require the ma- country formed no feature of it. turest consideration of parliament, The Duke of Sussex gave bis yet under these circumstances an opinion on some of the treaties adjournment of from two to three with foreign countries which had mooths was proposed without a transpired, and expressed his wishes single reason assigned. His lord with regard to several of the points ship then touched upon the sub- to be settled at the congress. jects which peculiarly demanded The Earl of Donoughmore, in their immediate attention. These reply to the assertion, that the were, the corn laws, the state of time proposed for the adjourothe circulating medium of the ment was not much beyond the country, its finances, the reduc- usual period, observed that the tion of the immense war establish- present was in no respect an usual ments, and the war with America, time, and that the weigbty conwhich, from the demands ad- cerps now under discussion at vanced by us, appeared to be con- Vienna, were precisely a reason verted to a war of aggrandisement. why parliament should be at hand Was this a situation of things in to give counsel to ministers. But, which, for reasons of private con- (said he) their language to parliavenience, they ought to turn their ment is tantamount to this backs on their public duties? “You are very good instruments

The Earl of Liverpool began by of taxation, but we do not want observing, that it was an error to you as advisers." suppose that the adjournment im- . The question was then put and plied a waste of two or three carried. months, since, until the last ses. The motion for adjournment in sion, the House had long been the House of Commons occasioned accustomed not to meet before the a debate of which it is unnecesmiddle of January, not more than sary to relate the particulars. A three weeks preceding the tinie to division took place on the queswhich the adjournment was pro- tion, For the motion 86; Against posed to extend. With respect to ii 23 : Majority 63.

CHAP

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