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by the body of French represen- titles of his nobility and officers tatives, to consider the dictates of of state, and the etiquette of his policy on this subject, confidently court, were all copied from Euroexpressed an opinion, that these pean examples; and the whole chiefs would with eagerness re- afforded a kind of burlesque of cognize the sovereignty of Louis royalty, which might induce a XVIII. and submit to his will, suspicion, that the business would events have hitherto entirely con- terminate rather in farce than tratradicted this expectation. An gedy, were not desperate resoluextract of a dispatch from the mi. tion compatible with ostentatious nister secretary of state for foreign levity in half-savage characters. affairs to Christophe, now entitling On Aug. 15th, there was pubhimself Henry king of Hayti, ad lished in the Royal Gazette of dressed to M. Peltier, London, Hayti, an address to the people, and dated June roth, the urth year' stating the circumstances in which of independence, was published in the country was placed by the deSeptember, giving an account of position of Buonaparte. It prothe feelings of his sovereign on fessed a willingness to negociate a being informed of the fall of Buo. treaty of commerce with the king naparte, and of the preparations of France, but in the most enerhe had been making for the de- getic terms called upon the Hayfence of his kingdom. In this tians to make every exertion paper a declaration is made of the in defence of their liberty and king of Hayli's readiness to re- independence, were arms emceive French merchant ships in his ployed against them. One of its ports, upon the same footing as paragraphs was as follows: “should those of other nations; but it is certain colonists, our implacable clearly specified, that he means to enemies, still persist in their chifreat with France only as one in- merical projects, and succeed in dependent power with another. A prevailing upon the actual goprivate letter from Port au Prince, verument of France to carry on the seat of Petion's power, dated war against us, let them place August ist, mentions the determi. themselves at the head of the innation of that leader also to sub- vaders ; they shall be the first mit to every extremity rather victims of our vengeance! We than yield to an invader.

shall give no quarter--we shall It might have been previously take no prisoners: we desire to be mentioned, that the King of treated in the same way ourselves, Hayti commenced the year with á and the war must become a war Fete of Independence, in which of extermination." On October all the ponip and circumstance 2d, was published a manifesto of that could attend a festival cele. King Henry, giving a detailed brated by the greatest monarch in narrative of the events which had the world was closely imitated, produced and accompanied the inand a royal speech' was pro. dependence of Hayri, and ex. nounced, in a style exhibiting a pressing a firm resolution to maincurious mixture of oriental infla- tain it. This piece was evidently tion and French gasconade. The the composition of a practised pen,

and

and in strength and clearnegs cessary aid, in order to destroy all might vie with any manifesto of the governments which have been an European sovereign. It con- the offspring of the French revocluded with the solemn declara- lution, whether in Europe, or in tion, that be would never consent the New World. Know also, to any treaty, or any condition, that it is Great Britain, who is the that should compromise the ho- centre of and principal party to nour, the liberty, and the iode. this convention, to which, a few pendence of the Haytian people. months sooner or later, every go

It was not, however, by arms, vernment will find it necessary to that the first attempt was made submit : every government and to restore Hayti to the dominion every potentate that shall refuse of France. A French general, so to submit, must expect to be named D'Auxion Lavaysse, and treated as traitors and brigands." bearing the character of an envoy That this assertion, as it respects from Louis XVIII, addressed from England, is a gross falsehood, we Kingston in Jamaica, on October presume, is undeniable; and it ist, a letter “to Gen. Henry may be hoped, that it is not less so Christophe, supreme Head of the with respect to the other powers. government of the North of It was with true magnanimity, Hayti,” in which, at considerable that King Henry, convoking an length, he placed before him every extraordinary council of the nation, argument to induce him to pro- laid before them this document, claim the king of France. He together with the pamphlet of one endeavoured to shew him, that it H. Henry, printed at Jamaica, was his personal interest rather to desiring them calmly to deliberate become “an illustrious servant of on their contents, and form such the great sovereign of the French, resolutions as they should deem tban a chief of revolted slaves." necessary for the welfare of the Like the generality of his coun- country. This confidence was retrymen in their diplomatic func- paid by an address to the King, in tions, he did not scruple to em- the warmest language of patriotic ploy falschood to gain bis point; devotion. It adds, “ No, never and the following passage of his shall this execrable enterprize letter is worthy of notice. “ Do not (against Hayti) take place. There deceive yourself, General,--the is honour, there is a sense of Sovereigns of Europe, although they glory, among the sovereigns and have made peace, bave not returned people of Europe ; and Great Brithesword into the scabbard. Doubt- tain, that Liberator of the World, less, you are not ignorant of what will prevent such an abomination." every body in Europe knows, al. Lavaysse made an application of though a thing not yet diploma- a similar purpose, though in amtically published that the prio- biguous language, to Petion, and cipal articles of the compact which on Oct. 21st, he was suffered to all the European sovereigns bave land at Port au Prince, that he just signed, on their royal honour, might explain in person the prois to unite their armies, if need posals of which he was the bearer. be, and to lend each other all ne. On his arrival be fell dangerously

CHAPTER XVIII.

· Autumnal Session of Parliament.-Speech of the Prince Regent.-dela

dress and Debates.- Motion in the House of Lords relative to keeping part of the Militia still embodied. The same in the House of Commons. - Motion relative to the Court-Martial on Colonel Quentin-Amended Bill for the Preservation of Peace in Ireland.--Adjourninent,

THE autumnal Session of Par. was given of his Royal Highness's

liament was opened on Nov. endeavours to consolidate the peace 8th by the Prince Regent in per- in which he had been a party, by son. The principal topic of bis a just equilibrium among the powspeech was the War with the ers of Europe. Addressing the United States of America, which House of Commons, the speech his Royal Highness affirmed to informed them of the flourishing have originated in the most un- state of the public revenue and provoked aggression on the part commerce, but expressed regret of their Goveroment, and to have for the necessity of a large expen, been calculated to promote the de- diture in the ensuing year. It signs of the common enemy of concluded with an observation on Europe. It was, however, his the state in which the late war sincere desire to bring it to a con- must have left the countries enclusion upon just and honourable gaged in it, with respect to their terms, and he was still engaged in internal conditition, and their compegociations for that purpose. mercial relations; and with reThe speech then adveried to the commending to Parliament great successful operations of the war caution in adopting regulations for during the present year; and in extending our trade, and securing touching on the capture of Wash- our present advantages. ington, remarked that it had pro- In the House of Lords, the corduced on the inhabitants a deep responding address to the Prince and sensible impression of the ca- Regent was moved by the Earl of lamities of a war in which they had dbingdon, and was secouded by been so wantonly involved. A Earl Delau'are. slight notice was then taken of the The Earl of Darnley then rose, reverse on Lake Champlain; but and said, he wished he could have confident expectations were ex- coincided with the last noble lord pressed of establishing the ascen- in the youthful ardour with which dency of his Majesty's arms in he hailed the national prospects; Canada. The retardation of the but on the whole view of the state opening of the Congress at Vienna of the country he found no cause was next spoken of, as owing to for congratulation. He particuunavoidable causes, and assurance !arly adverted to the extraordinary

circumstance,

circumstance, that while our mi- in Canada were alluded to, when litary reputation was raised to the the noble lord should bring on his highest pitch, our naval should inquiry in a regular shape, he have sunk, and that during the trusted he should be able to satisfy course of the war, with but few ex- him. ceptions, victory should have been Lord Grenville said he was not on tbe enemy's side in actions be- to be drawn off by this parade of tween vessels of the same class. detail from the actual fact, that

Lord Melville in reply to this there was a general impression in observation, said that such gene- the country of great mismanageral and declamatory charges were ment in the naval administration. not capable of an answer, but he The opinion of the community would ask to what distinct failure could not be misunderstood, when the allusion was made. He would the merchants of England, after himself enter into a few details on having been repelled from the Adthe subject. The Americans sendo miralty with Alippant and empty ing no fleets to sea, but possessing answers, were seen laying their renumerous seamen, and a multitude monstrances at the foot of the of privateers, the question of suce throne. After some further obcess or discomfiture was to be de- servations to this purpose, be said he cided by looking to the protection hoped there would be an early day afforded to trade against their means appointed for the inquiry; and of annoyance. We had now within that it would be entered into with a few hundreds, 20,000 Ameri- solemn and impartial seriousness. can seamen prisoners of war. We His Lordship then, adverting to had captured from them more the address, acknowledged that than 200 ships of war and armed with all his desire to look favouravessels, and bad taken goo other bly on the prospects of the counvessels. Notwithstanding the in- try, they were clouded to his view. crease of their privateers, the pre- The speech told them only of new mium of insurance was somewbat burdens, of severe additions to those less in last June, than in the June which were already severe ; po preceding. The captures made economy, no husbandling, no refrom us from the peace of Paris duction. He lamented its landown to the last month were re- guage respecting the negociation ported at 172; but of these 94 with America. He professed a were running ships; and of the readiness to make peace on just Test, 38 were separated from con- and honourable terms; but these voy, either through stress of wea- were mere words of course, and he ther, or wilfully; and the whole should have expected a declaration number of the coasting trade lost what were the grounds on which was only ul. With respect to the peace would be made. He hoped poble lord's assertion, that when the war still carried on was not one our ships met with an equal force of resentment or revenge, much of the enemy's, they were beaten, less of punishment, in order to except in a few instances, he could make the people of the United assure him that he was totally mis. States feel the weight of our power, laken. If the events of the war This topic led his lordship to conCHAPTER XVIII.

· Autumnal Session of Parliament.-Speech of the Prince Regent.-dela

dress and Debates.- Motion in the House of Lords relative to keeping part of the Militia still embodied. The same in the House of Commons. - Motion relative to the Court-Martial on Colonel Quentin-- Amended Bill for the Preservation of Peace in Ireland:-Adjourninent,

THE autumnal Session of Par- was given of his Royal Highness's

liament was opened on Nov. endeavours to consolidate the peace 8th by the Prince Regent in per- in which he had been a party, by son. The principal topic of his a just equilibrium among the pawspeech was the War with the ers of Europe. Addressing the United States of America, which House of Commons, the speech his Royal Highness affirmed to informed them of the flourishing have originated in the most un- state of the public revenue and provoked aggression on the part commerce, but expressed regret of their Government, and to have for the necessity of a large expenbeen calculated to promote the de- diture in the ensuing year. It signs of the common enemy of concluded with an observation on Europe. It was, however, his the state in which the late war sincere desire to bring it to a con- must have left the countries enclusion upon just and honourable gaged in it, with respect to their terms, and he was still engaged in internal conditition, and their comnegociations for that purpose. mercial relations; and with reThe speech then adverted to the commending to Parliament great successful operations of the war caution in adopting regulations for during the present year; and in extending our trade, and securing touching on the capture of Wash- our present advantages. ington, remarked that it had pro- In the House of Lords, the corduced on the inhabitants a deep responding address to the Prince and sensible impression of the ca- Regent was moved by the Earl of lamities of a war in which they had dbingdon, and was seconded by been so wantonly involved. A Earl Delaware. slight notice was then taken of the The Earl of Darnley then rose, reverse on Lake Champlain; but and said, he wished he could have confident expectations were ex- coincided with the last noble lord pressed of establishing the ascen- in the youthful ardour with which dency of his Majesty's arms in he hailed the national prospects; Canada. The retardation of the but on the whole view of the state opening of the Congress at Vienna of the country he found no cause was next spoken of, as owing to for congratulation. He particuunavoidable causes, and assurance larly adverted to the extraordinary

circumstance,

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