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Naval Transactions.- Attempt by Sea and Land on Leghorn.-Caplure

of La Ceres.-Capture of L'Alcmene and LIphigenie.-Capture of La Terpsichore.Capture of La Clorinde.- Capture of La Sultane and L'Etoile.-Capture of the Essex American Frigate.-Capture of the Frolic American Sloop.-Capture of the Reindeer British Brig by the Wasp American Sloop.- Destruction of the American Privateer Gen. Arnold.

T HIS year, like several of the in annoying the British trade by

I preceding, has been destitute their privateers, to which species of occasions for any of those great of warfare they have chiefly conactions which, in the former part fined their enterprize on the open of the war, conferred so much sea, their larger vessels having celebrity on the British navy. The seldom appeared out of port. attempts of the French ruler to re- We revert to the close of the gain maritime consequence, were last year for a narrative of a galso effectually thwarted by his lant enterprize conducted under ambitious projects on land, and the command of Captain Sir Jotheir fatal results, that the equip- sias Rowley, of the America, in ment of a few frigates was the conjunction with a land force of greatest exertion of which his na. Italians under Lieut.-Col. Cataval resources were capable; and nelli, the object of which was to the number of those captured has surprize the port of Leghorn. On peculiarly distinguished the early Nov. 29th, Captain Rowley sailed months of the year. After that pe- from Palermo in company with riod, one enemy alone remained the Termagant, and having joined to contend against the British the Furieuse and Mermaid, and flag; and it was only upon those taken on board the Italian levy, inland seas, on which that anta- amounting to one thousand men, gonist possesses at least divided sailed for the coast of Italy. They sway,- that any equal trial of arrived off Via Reggio on Decemstrength could occur. The power- ber gth, having met with the Arful fleet blockading the American mada and Imperieuse, which were coast has been chiefly employed in detained to assist in landing the aiding the operations of the land troops. This service baviog been forces, and in small expeditions up effected, Lieutenant-Colonel Cathe bays and rivers, for the pur- tanelli proceeded to Lucca, wbich pose of harassing the commerce, was surrendered to him, and a and destroying the resources of party of marines took and destroythe enemy. In return, the Ame- ed a fortified signal-gation. Caricans have been extremely active tanelli afterwards repulsed with

loss loss a party of troops from the in company with the Tagus, Capgarrisons of Leghorn and Pisa tain Pipon. The chase continued which caine to attack him at all that day, and at daylight on the Via Reggio; and the weak state 6th they were only a mile and a of the remaining garrison of Leg- half from the object of pursuit. born being learned from the pri- The Tagus being to windward, soners, it was determined to make was first enabled to open its fire, an attack upon that place. The which was briskly returned by the ships accordingly proceeded for enemy; when, after a few broad. Leghorn roads, and the troops, sides, the French frigate's mainwith the marines, were landed on top-mast was shot away, and her the 13th. On that evening they escape rendered impossible. The got possession of the suburbs of Niger then coming up, farther reLegborn; and on the following sistance would have been an usemorning the marines were attack- less waste of lives; the French ed on the Pisa road by a consider- ship, therefore, firing another able body of the enemy, infantry broadside, struck her colours. She and cavalry, with two field-pieces. proved to be La Ceres, of fortyThey received the charge of the four guins and three hundred and cavalry with great coolness, kill- twenty-four men, commanded by ing the greatest part of them; and the Baron de Bougainville, only afterwards, advancing against the one month from Brest, on her first enemy's infantry, they put them cruize. entirely to the rout. The com- Rear-Admiral Durham, com. mandant of Leghorn was then mander-in-chief on the Leeward summoned, but without effect; Islands station, reported in January and it being now ascertained that bis success in the capture of two ao attack on the place could not French frigates. On the 16th of be attempted with any chance of that month, the Cyane having success, it was thought expedient given the signal for two strange to re-embark the whole force, sail, chase was immediately made, which was effected during the and the Venerable, by superior night or the next morning without sailing, came up with them at the molestation from the enemy. The close of the day, leaving the Cyloss sustained by the assailants in ane far astern. The leewardmost this spirited attempt was inconsi- of the ships being hailed to surderable : that of the adverse party render without effect, a cannonwas estimated at from 250 to 300 ading began, when she made a in killed, wounded, and prisoners. bold attempt to lay the Venerable

Captain Rainier, of the Niger, on board, but the consequence communicated on January 6th, to was, that she herself was boarded Rear-Admiral Dixon at Rio Janei- and taken. She proved to be the ro, an account of the capture of a Alcmene, a fine French frigate of French frigate. He stated, that 44 guns, commanded by M. Duhaving made the island of St. crest de Villeneuve, an officer of Antonio on the preceding morning, merit. Her resistance cost her for the purpose of correcting his thirty men killed and fifty woundlongitude, he discovered a strange ed; the loss in the Venerable was sail, and immediately gave chase, inconsiderable. Her consort, in

the Iyar, although it does justice to her loss and damage as trifling. It his humane and generous conduct is apparent that the American fire after the victory. The American must have been much more forcomplains of the attack as a viola- midable than the British. tion of neutral territory, and inti. The daring enterprize of British mates an understanding between seamen, restricted for want of octhe governor of Valparaiso and the casions for exertion, has in this, British commander.

as in foriner years, broke out in An account was communicated some of those desperate attempts by Captain Pigot, of the Orpheus, for carrying ships at anchor by dated New Providence, April' means of armed boats, which 25th, of his having, after a chase might perhaps be censured for of 60 miles, taken off Cuba the rashness, were not the preservaUnited States ship Frolic, carrying tion of the spirit of the navy a 20 32-pound carronades, and 2 matter of the first importance. long 18-pounders, with a crew of One of these, in which final suc171 men, out two months from cess was obtained, though with a - Boston.

formidable loss, appears worthy of A very severe action, ending record. An English squadron, -unfortunately to the British flag, consisting of the Plantagenet, Rotook place on June 28th, lat. 48 N. ta, and Carnation, arriving near long. 11 W. between the English the close of September in the road brig of war Reindeer, Captain Man- of Fayal, a Portuguese harbour in ners, and the American sloop of the Azores, descried the General war Wasp, Capt. Blakeley. Capt. Armstrong, a large American Manners perceiving an enemy to schooner privateer, at anchor in the leeward on the morning of the roads. A boat was dispatched that day, gave chase, and about 3 to reconnoitre her force as she was -p: m. the two vessels were yard. getting under weigh, which being arm and yard-arm. The engage- driven by the tide near the schooment was maintained with the ner, was hailed, and desired to most determined spirit for 25 mi. keep off. This being impracticanutes, when the Reindeer, having ble, the boat was fired into, and lost her brave captain, her purser, seven men were killed. The Engand 27 men killed and 40 wound- lish commodore considering this ed, among whom were almost all act as an infraction of the neutralher officers, and having been re- ity of the port, ordered the Carpulsed in two attempts to board, nation in to destroy the privateer ; was under the necessity of striking and as the rocky ground prevented her colours. Such was the injury tbe ship from getting near enough, she received, that it was found nine boats, with three lieutenants, necessary on the following day to and about two hundred men, were destroy her. The superiority of dispatched for the purpose. On men, and weight of metal, on the approaching the schooner, they American side, is stated as very were received wish a most deconsiderable. It was thought that structive fire from a 32-pounder ; the Wasp had suffered much, but and, in the end, the privateer's later accounts from ker represent men escaped on shore, whence they

of the Eurotas was 20 killed, and Chili, by the Phæbe frigate, Cap. 39 wounded,

tain Hillyar, in company with the On March 26th, the Hannibal, Cherub sloop, Captain Tucker. of 74 guns, Captain Sir M. Sey- Captain Hillgar, in his letter dat. mour, and the Hebrus frigate, ed Valparaiso Bay, March 30th, Captain Palmer, gave chase to two informs the Secretary of the AdFrench frigates near the coast of miralty, that on the afternoon of France, one of which, the Sultan, the 28th inst. after nearly five of 44 guns, was soon captured by months anxious search, and six ibe Hannibal off the isle of Bas, weeks more anxious look-out for and was brought into Portsmouth the Essex and her companion, (a on the 28tb. The other was pur. corvette of 20 guns), to quit the sued during the whole day by the port of Valparaiso, he saw her Hebrus, and at midnight bad under weigh, and immediately, reacbed the race of Alderney. She accompanied by the Cherub, made then , rounded Point Joubourg to sail to close with her. On roundget into the bay of La Hogue, ing the point of the bay, the Essex where, about one or two on the lost her main-top-mast; and not befollowing morning, the Hebrus, ing able to regain the limits of the .sunging in between her and the neutral port, bore up, and anchorshore, brought her to close action. ed very near to the shore a few After an obstinate combat of two miles to the leeward of it. After hours and a quarter, the ships al. some distant firing, the Phæbe most touching, she struck her co- closed with the Essex at 35 milours. It was necessary imme- nutes past five in the afternoon, diately to put the heads of both when a very serious, and, indeed, ships off shore, as well through unequal conflict ensued, the Cheapprehension of grounding, as in rab much contributing to the anorder to get clear of a battery on noyance of the enemy. The deshore, which had been firing at fence of the Essex (says Captain both, not being able to distinguish Hillyar) did honour to her brave one from the other. The prize defenders, and fully evinced the was L'Etoile, of 44 guns and 320 courage of Captain Porter and men, commanded by M. Phillin those under his command. She bert, who was returning with La was twice on fire, and did not Saltane from a four months' cruise strike her colours till her luss uf to the westward. She had 40 men was so great, and her condikilled, and upwards of 70 wound. tion so bad, that farther resistance ed, in the action, and the loss in was manifestly unavailing. The the Hebrus was considerable, a- engagement ceased at 20 minutes mounting to 13 killed and 25 past six. The loss on the part of wounded.

the victors was not very considerThe American frigate Essex, able. A very detailed account of Captain Porter, which bad been this affair was transmitted to the long cruizing on the coasts of American government by Captain South America, and had made Porter, written in an ostentatious many caplures, especially among and evidently partial manner, and the English south-wbalers, was at differing in several respects from length taken off Valparaiso in the plain narrative of Captain Hil

Jyar

Jyar, although it does justice to her loss and damage as trifliog. It his humane and generous conduct is apparent that the American fire after the victory. The American must have been much morc forcomplains of the attack as a viola- midable than the British. tion of neutral territory, and inti- The daring enterprize of British mates an understanding between seamen, restricted for want of octhe governor of Valparaiso and the easions for exertion, has in tbis, British commander.. . as in foriner years, broke out in

An account was communicated some of those desperate attempts by Captain Pigot, of the Orpheus, for carrying ships at anchor by dated New Providence, April means of armed boats, which 25th, of his having, after a chase might perhaps be censured for of 60 miles, -taken off Cuba the rashness, were not the preservaUnited States ship Frolic, carrying tion of the spirit of the navy a 20 32-pound carronades, and 2 matter of the first importance. -long 18-pounders, with a crew of One of these, in which final suc

171 men, out two months from cess was obtained, though with a · Boston,

formidable loss, appears worthy of A very severe action, ending record. An · English squadron, -unfortunately to the British flag, consisting of the Plantagenet, Rotook place on June 28th, lat. 48 N. ta, and Carnation, arriving near long. 11 W. between the English the close of September in the road brig of war Reindeer, Captain Man- of Fayal, a Portuguese harbour in ners, and the American sloop of the Azores, descried the General war Wasp, Capt. Blakeley. Capt. Armstrong, a large American Manners perceiving an enemy to schooner privateer, at anchor in the leeward on the morning of the roads. A boat was dispatched that day, gave chase, and about 3 to reconnoitre her force as she was p. m. the two vessels were yard- getting under weigh, which being arm and yard-arm. The engage- driven by the tide near the schooment was maintained with the ner, was hailed, and desired to most determined spirit for 25 mi- keep off. This being impracticanutes, when the Reindeer, having ble, the boat was fired into, and lost her brave captain, her purser, seven men were killed. The Engand 27 men killed and 40 woundlish commodore considering this ed, among whom were almost all act as an infraction of the neutralher officers, and having been re- ity of the port, ordered the Carpulsed in two attempts to board, nation in to destroy the privateer ; was under the necessity of striking and as the rocky ground prevented her colours. Such was the injury the ship from getting near enough, she received, that it was found nine boats, with three lieutenants, necessary on the following day to and about two hundred men, were destroy her. The superiority of dispatched for the purpose. On men, and weight of metal, on the approaching the schooner, they American side, is stated as very were received wish a most deconsiderable. It was thought that structive fire from a 32-pounder ; the Wasp had suffered much, but and, in the end, the privateer's later accounts from her represent men escaped on shore, whence they

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