Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

had never been the object of mini- which, during the contest, bad sters, yet he was convinced that been so often changed. With rewe could have had no satisfactory spect to the declaration in the ad. peace witb any other government dress, “ that the treaty was conin that country. At the conclu. siderate for the interests and the sion of former wars we had some honour of all," he said, that the times abandoned our allies, and interests of our fisheries had cer, consulted only our own interests: tainly been neglected in the 13th the present peace was made in article of the treaty, wbich reconjunction with them, and with signed the most important parts of their full approbation and grati. the coasts of Newfoundland, La, tude for our services. Never did brador, and the river St. Laus the character of Great Britain rence. stand so bigb as at the present mo Mr. Rose asserted that more ment.

concessions to France with respect The address was agreed to, nem. to the fisheries had not been made con.

by this treaty than by foriner On June 29th, Lord Lascelles treaties with that country; and he moved in the House of Commons pronounced the hon. baronet's an address to the Prince Regent statements on this head to be alto, on the peace with France. The gether visionary. introductory speech was similar Mr. Wilberforce spoke much in to that on the same occasion in the favour of the general spirit of the House of Lords; and the tenor of treaty, and particularly commendthe address was to express satis- ed that article by which it was faction with the peace, as having stipulated that no persons belong. fully accomplished the great ob- ing to the ceded countries, or any jeets of the war; and by the re- others, should be molested for any storation of so many legitimate opinions or conduct which they authorities on the continent, af. had adopted under a different go, forded the best prospect of perma, vernment. He was the more nent tranquillity to Europe. Boxious to refer to this stipulation

The motion was seconded by on account of the affecting intelMr. Gooch, who added to the sen- ligence from Spain, where many timents of the former speaker, of the noblest characters in the that “to the principles of Mr. Pitt late government lay under a severe the successful issue of the war was persecution; and he instanced due."

Signor Arguelles, from whom he · Sir Jolun Newport noticed the had some time before received a impropriety of introducing topics letter, mentioning his intention of which could not but create dis- moving in the Cortes the abolition sent. What connection the Duke of the slave trade. This led the of Wellington had with the prin- hon. gentleman to allude to that ciples of Mr. Pitt he could not article of the treaty on which he discover. Instead of the unvaried bad already expressed his opinion ; system on which, according to the and as he did not wish to disturb mover and seconder, the war had the unanimity of parliament, yet been conducted, he thought there was desirous of preserving his own peyer was a war, the grounds of feelings from misconstruction, he

would He then went through the parti- placed in his hands, he had detero culars of the treaty with France, mined to adhere to the line of powhich it is unnecessary here to licy which his Majesty had adopt. repeat; and he expressed liberal ed, and in which he found zealsentiments on the prospect offered ous support from parliament, from of future amity and good will be- all classes of his Majesty's subtween the two countries. “ If," jects, and from the valour of his said he, “ no other blessing had Majesty's forces by sea and land. been derived from all that has bap- That he had the satisfaction of peped, it would be no unsatisfac. contemplating the full accomtory one to feel that the spell is plishment of all the objects for dissolved by which Great Britain which the war was undertaken and France were supposed to be or continued, and the final delinecessarily enemies." His lord- verance of Europe by the combinship concluded a speech, which ed exertions of this nation and its appeared to obtain the general allies, from the most oppressive applause of the house, by a com- tyranny under which it had ever pliment to the vigorous and sted. laboured. That the restoration of fast conduct of the Prince Regent so many of the ancient governat this momentous period; and the ments of the continent afforded Address, as amended, was agreed the best prospect of the perma. to without opposition.

nence of peace, and that his efOn July 30th, the Prince Re. forts might be relied on at the gent came in state to the House of approaching congress for completLords, and being seated on the ing the settlement of Europe Upon throne in full robes, with his great principles of justice and impar· officers ranged on each side, and tiality. That he lamented the con. the peers being present in their tinuance of hostilities with the places, a message was sent to the United States of America, and House of Commons, requiring notwithstanding the unprovoked their attendance. The Speaker aggression of the government of shortly after arrived, accompanied that country, was sincerely desiby several members, and present. rous of the restoration of peace on ing to bis Royal Highness ihe vote conditions honourable to both; of credit bill for three millions, but that until this object could made an address to him, in which be obtained, parliament would see he recapitulated the principal pro- the necessity of his employing the ceedings of the house during the means at his disposal for prosesession, and adverted to the great cuting the war with increased vi, and glorious events which had gour. made so happy a change in the His Royal Highness then thankaffairs of Europe.

ed the House of Commons for the The Prince Regent then deli- liberal provision they had made for vered a speech to the following the services of the year, and adeffect.' After lamenting the con- verted to the necessity of maintinuance of his Majesty's unfor- taining for a time a body of troops Tunate indisposition, he said, that in British pay on the continent. ou assuming the powers of go. He concluded with assuring both ycroment which that tient had Houses that full justice was ren

dered

address, who had arrogated all He had, however, felt satisfied, that wisdom to the supporters of the as long as this person should conwar, and ascribed nothing but tinue de facto at the head of the error to all who, with himself, French government, there was no had thought and acted on opposite other alternative than to treat principles. He then said, the with him. The house would retime was come in which he could member that he (Lord C.) had tell the noble lord (Castlereagh) gone expressly to treat with him, that excepting the article respect. in conjunction with our allies. ing the slave trade, he had fully The projet which they gave in at and completely deserved that con- Chatillon was framed after he fidence which he reposed in him. bad been successively victoriIn bis opinion, nothing in the noble ous in Ave engagements, and lord's conduct did him more honour when a considerable uncertainty thao having fairly tried the experi prevailed as to the final issue of ment of negociating with the then ihe campaigo. At the same moruler of France; and though the ment the allied powers entered papers of the negociation at Chatil- into that solemn compact at Chaulon had not been produced, he was mont, by which four of them enfully convinced that it had been gaged to bring into the field broken off only in consequence 600,000 men; the most iinportant of the folly and madness of Buo- contract that perhaps the history naparte himself. There had been of European diplomacy could furno evidence of the impracticabi- nish. An impression had gone lity of such a measure till the no- abroad, that the negociations at ble lord bad tried it; being then Chatillon had been broken off in found impracticable, no man more consequence of the transactions rejoiced in the restoration of the which had taken place at BourBourbons than he did.

deaux ; but this was entirely un-' Lord Castlereagh commenced a founded. These events were inspeech with expressing his grati- deed known at Chatillon, but the tade for the candour and liberal. progress of the negociations was ity with which he had been treated not suspended until the allies were by the house, both during his ab- clearly convinced that Buonaparte sence from it, and now upon his was trifling with them. His Tordreturn. He then entered upon ship then proceeded to state the such explanations as might be ex- principles by which Great Britain pected from him, relative to the bad been guided in negociating treaty in which he had been in the treaty under consideration. He strumental. With respect to the said, the language uniformly held negociations at Chatillon, he could by this country to the continent confidently assert, from the means had been, that if the people of of information afforded during Europe were willing to fight for their course, that the mind of the their own liberties, England would individual who then ruled France stand by them; but if they shrunk was so deeply wounded by the from the contest, then England transactions which had occurred, was determined to do justice to that no secure or durable peace herself, and provide by her own could have been made with him. strength for her own security.

Не He then went through the parti- placed in his hands, he had deter. culars of the treaty with France, mined to adhere to the line of powhich it is unnecessary here to licy which his Majesty had adoptrepeat; and he expressed liberal ed, and in which he found zealsentiments on the prospect offered ous support from parliament, from of future amity and good will be all classes of his Majesty's subtween the two countries. « If," jects, and from the valour of his said he," no other blessing had Majesty's forces by sea and land. been derived from all that has hap- That he had the satisfaction of pened, it would be no unsatisfac- contemplating the full accomtory one to feel that the spell is plishment of all the objects for dissolved by which Great Britain which the war was undertaken and France were supposed to be or continued, and the final delinecessarily enemies." His lord- verance of Europe by the combinship concluded a speech, which ed exertions of this nation and its appeared to obtain the geveral allies, from the most oppressive applause of the house, by a com- tyranny under which it had ever pliment to the vigorous and sted. laboured. That the restoration of fast conduct of the Prince Regent so many of the ancient governat this momentous period; and the ments of the continent afforded Address, as amended, was agreed the best prospect of the perma. to without opposition.

nence of peace, and that his efOn July 30th, the Prince Re. forts might be relied on at the gent came in state to the House of approaching congress for completLords, and being seated on the ing the settlement of Europe Upon throne in full robes, with his great principles of justice and imparofficers ranged on each side, and tiality. That he lamented the con. the peers being present in their tinuance of hostilities with the places, a message was sent to the United States of America, and House of Commons, requiring notwitbstanding the unprovoked their attendance. The Speaker aggression of the government of shortly after arrived, accompanied that country, was sincerely desiby several members, and present- rous of the restoration of peace on ing to bis Royal Highness the vote çonditions honourable to both; of credit bill for three millions, but that until this object could made an address to him, in which be obtained, parliament would see he recapitulated the principal pro- the necessity of his employing the ceedings of the house during the means at his disposal for prosesession, and adverted to the great cuting the war with increased vi, and glorious events which had gour. made so happy a change in the His Royal Highness then thank. affairs of Europe

ed the House of Commons for the The Prince Regent then deli- liberal provision they had made for vered a speech to the following the services of the year, and adeflict. After lamenting the con- verted to the necessity of maintinuance of his Majesty's unfor- taining for a time a body of troops tunate indisposition, he said, that in British pay on the continent. on assuming the powers of go. He concluded with assuring both yeroment which that tient had Houses that full justice was ren

dered

loss a party of troops from the in company with the Tagus, Capgarrisons of Legborn and Pisa tain Pipod. The chase continued which caine to attack him at all that day, and at daylight on the Via Reggio; and the weak state 6th they were only a mile and a of the rernaining garrison of Leg- half from the object of pursuit. hom being learned from the pri- The Tagus being to windward, soners, it was determined to make was first enabled to open its fire, an attack upon that place. The which was briskly returned by the ships accordingly proceeded for enemy; when, after a few broad. Leghorn roads, and the troops, sides, the French frigate's mainwith the marines, were landed on top-mast was shot away, and her the 13th. On that eveniog tbey escape rendered impossible. The got possession of the suburbs of Niger then coming up, farther re. Leghorn ; and on the following sistance would have been an usemorning the marines were attack- less waste of lives; the French ed on the Pisa road by a consider- ship, therefore, firing another able body of the enemy, infantry broadside, struck her colours. She and cavalry, with two field-pieces. proved to be La Ceres, of fortyThey received the charge of the four guns and three hundred and cavalry with great coolness, kills twenty-four men, commanded by ing the greatest part of them; and the Baron de Bougainville, only afterwards, advancing against the one month from Brest, on her first enemy's infantry, they put them cruize. entirely to the rout. The com- Rear-Admiral Durham, com. mandant of Leghorn was then mander-in-chief on the Leeward summoned, but without effect; Islands station, reported in January and it being now ascertained that his success in the capture of two ao attack on the place could pot French frigates. On the 16th of be attempted with any chance of that month, the Cyane having success, it was thought expedient given the signal for two strange to re-embark the whole force, sail, chase was immediately made, which was eftected during the and the Venerable, by superior night or the next morning without sailing, came up with them at the molestation from the enemy. The close of the day, leaving the Cyloss sustained by the assailants in ane far astern. The leewardmost this spirited attempt was inconsi- of the ships being hailed to surderable: that of the adverse party render without effect, a cannonwas estimated at from 250 to 300 ading began, when she made a in killed, wounded, and prisoners. bold attempt to lay the Venerable

Captain Rainier, of the Niger, on board, but the consequence communicated on January 6th, to was, that she herself was boarded Rear-Admiral Dixon at Rio Janei- and taken. She proved to be the to, an account of the capture of a Alcmene, a fine French frigate of French frigate. He stated, that 44 guns, commanded by M. Duharing made the island of St. crest de Villeneuve, an officer of Antonio on the preceding morning, mesit. Her resistance cost her for the purpose of correcting his thirty men killed and fifty woundlongitude, he discovered a strange ed; the loss in the Venerable was sail, and immediately gave chase, inconsiderable. Her consort, in

the

« ZurückWeiter »