Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

1st Session.

No. 1.

ARMY APPROPRIATION.

MESSAGE

FROM THE

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED

UNITED STATES,

ON

Transmitting notice of signing the army appropriation bill.

MARCH 4, 1867.–Laid on the table and ordered to be printed.

To the House of Representatives :

The act entitled “ An act making appropriations for the support of the army for the year ending June 30, 1868, and for other purposes," contains provi

, sions to which I must call attention.

These provisions are contained in the second section, which in certain cases virtually deprives the President of his constitutional functions as commanderin-chief of the army; and in the sixth section, which denies to ten States of the Union their constitutional right to protect themselves, in any emergency, by means of their own militia. These provisions are out of place in an appropriation act. I am compelled to defeat these necessary appropriations if I withhold my signature from the act. Pressed by these considerations, I feel constrained to return the bill with my signature, but to accompany it with my protest against the sections which I have indicated.

ANDREW JOHNSON. WASHINGTON, March 2, 1867.

[blocks in formation]

Letter from the Secretary of State, relative to the filing in his department of an

act to provide for the government of the rebel States.

MARCH 7, 1867.–Laid on the table and ordered to be printed.

CLERK's Office HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES UNITED STATES,

Washington, D. C., March 6, 1967. SIR: I have the honor to enclose, for the information of the House, a letter from the Secretary of State acknowledging the receipt of the act to provide for the more efficient government of the rebel States, and announcing his purpose to promulgate it. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWARD MCPHERSON,

Clerk of the House of Representatives. Hon. SCHUYLER COLFAX,

Speaker of the House of Representatives.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, March 4, 1867. Sir: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 2d instant, pre: senting the act of Congress entitled “ An act to provide for the more efficient government of the rebel States," passed on the 2d of March, 1867, by twothirds of both houses of Congress, after it had been returned by the President to the Ilouse of Representatives, and notwithstanding his objections. The act has been filed and will be duly promulgated as one of the laws of the United States. I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. EDWARD McPherson, Esq.,

Clerk of the House of Representatives.

[blocks in formation]

Estimates of appropriations for fulfilling treaty stipulations with the Shawnees.

MARCU, 1867.-Laid on the table and ordered to be printed.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, March 7, 1867. Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy of a letter, of the 2d instant, from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, submitting an “estimate of appropriations required to fulfil treaty with the Shawnees, made March 2, 1867,” amounting to $152,746 25, and commend the subject to the favorable consideration of Congress. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

0. H. BROWNING,

Secretary. Hon. SCHUYLER COLFAX,

Speaker House of Representatives.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, OFFICE INDIAN AFFAIRS,

Washington, March 2, 1867. SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith a treaty concluded this day with the Shawnee tribe of Indians, being the last of the series of treaties undertaken with a view of making arrangements for the removal of all of the Indians from Kansas.

More difficulty has been encountered in bringing about an arrangement for this tribe than in the case of any other, ou account of circumstances peculiar to their history and condition, and a statement of these, as brief as possible so as to be intelligible, will explain many features of the treaty.

The whole number of Shawnees is about 1,300. Under the treaty made with them in 1854 they ceded to the United States, for $829,000, (nearly all of which was to be paid in cash, in graduated payments) a large tract of land in Kansas, while there was reserved 200,000 acres, of which such as chose to take allotments in severalty were to have 200 acres each; a like amount per capita was set apart in common for members of a band called Black Bob's band, and others who should choose to bold in common with them; and the remainder of

« ZurückWeiter »