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BY REV. J. COLDSMITH,)-
Author of Gromas of Geograpby, Grammar of British Geography, &c.

FIRST AMERICAN EDITION,

REVISED, CORRECTED, AND IMPROVED, BY

JAMES G. PERCIVAL, M. D.

ILLUSTRATED BY

EIGHT COPPERPLATE VIEWS.

NEW-YORK:

E. HOPKINS AND W. REED.

.........

1826.

TIEK

مهندس ابواب F

ASTOR, LENOX AND
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS

R 1920 L

District of Connecticut, ss.

BE IT REMEMBEAED, That on the L. S. eleventh day of March, in the fiftieth year of the inde

pendence of the United States of America, EDWARD

Hopkins, of the said district, has deposited in this office the title of a Book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit: “A Geographical view of the World, embracing the Manners, Customs, and Pursuits of every nation, founded on the best authorities. By Rev. J. Goldsmith, author of Grammar of Geography, Grammar of British Geography, &c. First American edition, revised, corrected, and improved, by James G. Percival, M. D. Illustrated by eight copperplate views."

In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, “ An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned.” And also to the act, entitled, “ An act supplementary to an act, entitled “ An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned,' and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints."

CHARLES A. INGERSOLL,

Clerk of the district of Connecticut. 1 true copy of Record, examined and scaled by me,

CHARLES A. INGERSOLL,

Clerk of the district of Connecticut.

EUROPE Is bounded on the N. by the Arctic or Frozen Ocean ; E. by Asia, from which it is separated towards the north by the Ural mountains, and towards the south by the sea of Azoph, the Black sea, the sea of Marmora, and the Grecian Archipelago; on the S. by the Mediterranean, which separates it from Africa ; and on the W. by the Atlantic Ocean. Its greatest length, from cape St. Vincent at the southwestern extremity, to the Ural mountains, is about 4,000 miles; and from cape Matapan, at the southern extremity of Turkey, in lat. 36° 23'N. to the North cape in lat. 71° 11', N. it is 2,400 miles broad. The area is estimated by Hassel at 3,387,019 square miles.

OF LAPLAND.

The most northerly country in Europe, and extends from lat. 64° N. to the North cape in 71° 11'N. It is washed by the Atlantic ocean on the west, the Frozen ocean on the north, and the White sea on the east. Extent 152,720 sq. miles. Population 61,769.

Of the Dress of the Laplanders. The Laplanders wear a sort of pantaloons reaching down to their shoes, which are made of untanned skin, pointed, and turned up before, and in winter they put a little hay in them. Their waistcoat is made to fit the shape, and open at the breast. Over this they wear a close coat with narrow sleeves, which is fastened round them with a. leathern girdle, ornamented with plates of tin or brass. To the girdle they tie their knives, their instruments for obtaining fire, their pipes, and the rest of the smoking apparatus. Their clothes are. in general, bordered with fur, or bindings of cloth of different colours. Their caps are edged with fur, pointed at top, and adorned with different coloured lists.

The dress of the women is very like to that of the men, but in addition to it they wear handkerchiefs, short aprons made of painted cloth, rings on their fingers, and ear-rings, from which, among the better sort, are suspended chains of silver, which pass two or three times about their neck. They are much addicted to finery, and to the use of embroidery manufactured from brass wire, and where that cannot be had, list of different colours is substituted.

Habitations of the Laplanders. The Laplanders change their habitations according to the season ; living in houses in winter, but in summer they make use of tents.

The houses are built with stones and sods ; "they are roofed with beams and rafters, and small wood between them ; over these are Waid bushes and turf, with fine earth on the top. They have neither

Kloor nor chimney ; the former is supplied by two vaulted passages, XChrough which they must creep on their hands and foet

. At the comallest of these passages, the men sally forth to their bunting, or

other occupations ; but no woman attempts to make use of this cuCov, lest she should happen to meet the man at his departure, ma cir

cumstance that would be interpreted into a bad omon.

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