Famous cathedrals as seen and described by great writers

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Esther Singleton
Dodd, Mead & company, 1909 - 314 Seiten
 

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Seite 33 - Under the carver's hand it seems to cut like clay, to fold like silk, to grow like living branches, to leap like living flame. Canopy crowning canopy, pinnacle piercing pinnacle — it shoots and wreathes itself into an enchanted glade, inextricable, imperishable, fuller of leafage than any forest, and fuller of story than any book...
Seite 211 - There is no instance of a man before Gibbons who gave to wood the loose and airy lightness of flowers, and chained together the various productions . of the elements with a free disorder natural to each species.
Seite 31 - The mind is filled and elevated by its enormous height (140 ft.), its lofty and many - coloured clerestory, its grand proportions, its noble simplicity. The proportion of height to breadth is almost double that to which we are accustomed in English cathedrals ; the lofty, solid piers, which bear up this height, are far more massive in their plan than the light and graceful clusters of our English churches, each of them being a cylinder with 4 engaged columns.
Seite 31 - The polygonal east apse is a feature which we seldom see, and nowhere so exhibited, and on such a scale; and the peculiar French arrangement which puts the walls at the outside edge of the buttresses, and thus forms interior chapels all round, in addition to the aisles, gives a vast multiplicity of perspective below, which fills out the idea produced by the gigantic height of the centre. Such terms will not be considered extravagant when it is recollected that the roof is half as high again as the...
Seite 44 - ... whom the destruction of so much of the old glass at Salisbury is attributed. In the upper lights of the east window of the south transept is some Early English glass. At Oxford cathedral, in the Latin chapel, are three complete 14th century windows, and there is an interesting piece of work in the window at the west end of the north aisle of the nave painted by the younger Van Linge — Jonah and his gourd. In the south choir aisle is a reminiscence of the dissolution of the monastic houses in...
Seite 211 - The first statue admitted at S. Paul's was, not that of statesman, warrior, or even of sovereign ; it was that of John Howard the pilgrim, not to gorgeous shrines of saints and martyrs, not even to holy lands, but to the loathsome depths and darkness of the prisons throughout what called itself the civilised world. Howard first exposed to the shuddering sight of mankind the horrible barbarities, the foul and abominable secrets, of those dens of unmitigated suffering. By the exposure he at least let...
Seite 258 - The Decorated window at the west end of the north aisle of the nave remains in its original form. We have now come to the tower. This great work of Archbishop Minot's is unrivalled in Ireland, and unsurpassed as a belfry in the United Kingdom. It stands 147 feet in height from the nave floor to the battlements, and is 39 feet square at the base, with walls 10 feet thick of Irish limestone.
Seite 88 - ... modern reproduction of a much more ancient work. This curious sculpture commemorates the legend which connects itself with the choice of this site for the final resting-place of St. Cuthbert's remains. The legend runs that after the removal from Chester-le-Street, St. Cuthbert announced in a vision his determination to rest at Dunholm. The place was unknown ; but whilst the monks were wandering in search of it, a woman was heard asking another if she had seen her cow that had strayed, and the...
Seite 93 - Leon the Third consecrated it in 804, and tradition says that two bishops of Tongres, who were buried at Maestricht, arose from their graves, in order to complete, at that ceremony, 365 bishops and archbishops— representing the days of the year. This historical and legendary church, from which the town has taken its name, has undergone, during the last thousand years, many transformations. No sooner had I entered Aix than I went to the chapel. The portail, built of grey-blue granite, is of the...
Seite 306 - Fitz-Eustace' care A pierced and mangled body bare To moated Lichfield's lofty pile ; And there, beneath the southern aisle, A tomb, with Gothic sculpture fair, Did long Lord Marmion's image bear. (Now vainly for its site you look ; 'Twas leveled, when fanatic Brook The fair cathedral stormed and took; But, thanks to heaven and good Saint Chad, A guerdon meet the spoiler had...

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