On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, Or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life

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G. Richards, 1902 - 454 Seiten
 

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Inhalt

I
1
II
7
IV
41
V
56
VI
73
VII
119
VIII
154
IX
186
X
220
XI
250
XII
280
XIII
311
XV
344
XVI
370
XVII
413

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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 423 - In the distant future I see open fields for far more important researches. Psychology will be based on a new foundation, that of the necessary acquirement of each mental power and capacity by gradation. Light will be thrown on the origin of man and his history.
Seite 74 - If such do occur, can we doubt (remembering that many more individuals are born than can possibly survive) that individuals having any advantage, however slight, over others, would have the best chance of surviving and of procreating their kind? On the other hand, we may feel sure that any variation in the least degree injurious would be rigidly destroyed. This preservation of favourable individual differences and variations, and the destruction of those which are injurious, I have called Natural...
Seite 76 - Nature's productions should be far " truer " in character than man's productions ; that they should be infinitely better adapted to the most complex conditions of life, and should plainly bear the stamp of far higher workmanship...
Seite 180 - If it could be proved that any part of the structure of any one species had been formed for the exclusive good of another species, it would annihilate my theory, for such could not have been produced through natural selection.
Seite 170 - If it could be demonstrated that any complex organ existed, which could not possibly have been formed by numerous, successive, slight modifications, my theory would absolutely break down.
Seite 1 - When on board HMS Beagle, as naturalist, I was much struck with certain facts in the distribution of the organic beings inhabiting South America, and in the geological relations of the present to the past inhabitants of that continent.
Seite 375 - Nothing can be more hopeless than to attempt to explain this similarity of pattern in members of the same class, by utility or by the doctrine of final causes. The hopelessness of the attempt has been expressly admitted by Owen in his most interesting work on the 'Nature of Limbs.
Seite 67 - Battle within battle must ever be recurring with varying success ; and yet in the longrun the forces are so nicely balanced, that the face of nature remains uniform for long periods of time, though assuredly the merest trine would often give the victory to one organic being over another.
Seite 59 - It is the doctrine of Malthus applied with manifold force to the whole animal and vegetable kingdoms; for in this case there can be no artificial increase of food, and no prudential restraint from marriage. Although some species may be now increasing, more or less rapidly, in numbers, all cannot do so, for the world would not hold them. There is no exception to the rule that every organic being naturally increases at so high a rate, that if not destroyed, the earth would soon be covered by the progeny...
Seite 319 - Every species has come into existence coincident both in space and time with a pre-existing closely allied species.

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