Reports on the Paris universal exhibition, 1867. Vol.2-6 [and] Index to, Band 2

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1868
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Seite 199 - ... are pressed down upon it, are grated in imitation of a bow, by the parchment ; and so it is intended to resemble several vyalls played on with one bow, but so basely and harshly, that it will never do. But after three hours...
Seite 611 - It is said that even that delicate and most sensitive instrument of touch, the hand of the Hindu, is not sufficiently sensitive for fashioning the finest sorts of Indian filigree, and that children alone are employed in the manipulation of such a spiderweb of wire. Of fabrics so delicate, nothing is to be seen among the jewellery at Paris, indeed the best of the Indian filigree, and that by no means worthy of its source, is to be found among the articles exhibited under the goldsmith's class. It...
Seite 572 - Flowers are then thrown in, and left to digest for some hours, being stirred frequently ; after which the grease is taken out and pressed in horsehair bags. This operation is repeated, until the fatty body is sufficiently impregnated with the fragrance of the flowers. Oil is treated in the same way, but requires less heat The process...
Seite 472 - ... should be avoided ; first, because it places these objects in unseemly positions ; secondly, because it is customary in almost every apartment to suspend on the walls pictures, engravings, or other ornamental works, and that, therefore, the paper should serve as a background, and nothing on it should be offensive or advancing to the eyes.
Seite 237 - ... and in an ever-expanding sphere. As the successful scientific speculations of the last three centuries have been the natural sequel to the art-energies of the preceding ages, so must the newest scientific speculations of our contemporaries and their successors, in order to be successful, be the result and consequence of the powers, as yet often appearing in the undeveloped form of art alone, which exist among us at the present day. And thus a great spectacle of the works of material art ought...
Seite 611 - ... the jewellery at Paris, — indeed the best of the Indian filigree, and that by no means worthy of its source, is to be found among the articles exhibited under the goldsmith's class. It is to be remarked of this elegant and primitive— perhaps very earliest — form of ornament in precious metal, that it had probably reached its limits for delicacy and design at a very archaic period, and has made no real progress in recent times; that, in fact, the early Greek filigrainer worked with as much...
Seite 135 - The quantity of soap consumed by a nation would be no inaccurate measure whereby to estimate its wealth and civilization.
Seite 204 - Agraffes lapping over and alnilting against the wrest-plank, together with an entirely new arrangement of the strings and braces of this iron frame, by which the most important and advantageous results were achieved. The strings were arranged in such a position, that in the treble register their direction remained parallel with the blow of the hammers, whilst from the centre of the scale the unisons of the strings were gradually spread from right to left in the form of a fan, along the bridge of...
Seite 472 - ... unseemly positions ; secondly, because it is customary in almost every apartment to suspend on the walls pictures, engravings, or other ornamental works, and therefore the paper should serve as a background, and nothing on it should be obtrusive or advancing to the eye. Diaper-patterns in selftints are safest for this purpose, but when varieties of colours are used, the oriental rule of so interweaving the form and colour as that they may present a neutralised bloom when viewed at a distance...
Seite 254 - THE CALCULATING MACHINE, in its simplest THE EAGRE, OR BORE. 267 form, effects the operation of addition by causing a figured wheel to advance a given number of unit spaces, by moving through the same number of spaces a wheel with which it is in gear. The process of multiplication is merely that of successive additions, and subtraction and division are the inverse processes of the former. THE MAGNETO-ELECTRIC LIGHT, based on Faraday's discovery in 1831, and produced by steampower, causing the rotation...

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