The St. Peterburg English Review, Band 4

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S. Warrand
1842
 

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Seite 74 - Love had he found in huts where poor Men lie : His daily Teachers had been Woods and Rills, The silence that is in the starry sky, The sleep that is among the lonely hills.
Seite 174 - tis not that now I shrink from what is suffer'd : let him speak Who hath beheld decline upon my brow, Or seen my mind's convulsion leave it weak ; But in this page a record will I seek. Not in the air shall these my words disperse, Though I be ashes ; a far hour shall wreak The deep prophetic fulness of this verse, And pile on human heads the mountain of my curse ! cxxxv.
Seite 546 - ... a twining of arms, a grasping of hands, and a swift telegraphing upon the tiny fingers ; whose rapid evolutions convey the thoughts and feelings from the outposts of one mind to those of the other. There are questions and answers, exchanges of joy or sorrow, there are kissings and partings, just as between little children with all their senses.
Seite 545 - It has been ascertained beyond the possibility of doubt, that she cannot see a ray of light, cannot hear the least sound, and never exercises her sense of smell, if she have any.
Seite 549 - In her intellectual character it is pleasing to observe an insatiable thirst for knowledge, and a quick perception of the relations of things. In her moral character, it is beautiful to behold her continual gladness, her keen enjoyment of existence, her expansive love, her unhesitating confidence, her sympathy with suffering, her conscientiousness, truthfulness, and hopefulness.1 Such are a few fragments from the simple but most interesting and instructive history of Laura Bridgman.
Seite 546 - During the year she has attained great dexterity in the use of the manual alphabet of the deaf mutes; and she spells out the words and sentences which she knows so fast and so deftly that only those accustomed to this language can follow with the eye the rapid motions of her fingers. " ' But wonderful as is the rapidity with which she writes her thoughts upon the air, still more so is the ease and accuracy with which she reads the words thus written by another...
Seite 544 - Her teacher gives her a new object, for instance a pencil, first lets her examine it and get an idea of its use, then teaches her how to spell it by making the signs for the letters with her own fingers; the child grasps her hand and feels her fingers as the different letters are formed ; she turns her head a little on one side, like a person listening closely ; her lips are apart ; she seems scarcely to breathe; and her countenance, at first anxious, gradually changes to a smile, as she comprehends...
Seite 9 - You think I love flattery (says Dr. Johnson), and so I do; but a little too much always disgusts me: that fellow Richardson, on the contrary, could not be contented to sail quietly down the stream of reputation, without longing to taste the froth from every stroke of the oar.
Seite 507 - Provided also, and be it enacted, that if the said board shall be of opinion, that the subject matter of any of their deliberations concerning the levying war or making peace, or treating or negotiating with any of the native princes or states in India, or with any other princes or states, or touching the policy to be observed with respect to such princes or states...
Seite 548 - ... near her. Perceiving the matron, of whom she is very fond, she grasped her with one hand, holding on convulsively to her mother with the other; and thus she stood for a moment; then she dropped her mother's hand; put her handkerchief to her eyes; and turning round, clung sobbing to the matron; while her mother departed, with emotions as deep as those of her child.

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