The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, Band 9

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1893
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Seite 347 - As the apple tree among the trees of the wood, so is my beloved among the sons. I sat down under his shadow with great delight, and his fruit was sweet to my taste.
Seite 294 - Knowledge before — a discovery that there are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamed of in our philosophy.
Seite 269 - He touched the tender stops of various quills, With eager thought warbling his Doric lay: And now the sun had stretched out all the hills, And now was dropt into the western bay. At last he rose, and twitched his mantle blue : To-morrow to fresh woods, and pastures new.
Seite 301 - Thy country feels through her reviving arts, Plann'd by thy wisdom, by thy soul inform'd ; And seldom has she known a friend like thee. But see the fading many-colour'd woods, Shade deepening over shade, the country round Imbrown ; a crowded umbrage, dusk, and dun, Of every hue, from wan declining green To sooty dark.
Seite 356 - WASSAILE the trees, that they may beare You many a plum, and many a peare : For more or lesse fruits they will bring, As you doe give them wassailing.
Seite 286 - No man stood on truth. They were merely banded together, as usual, one leaning on another, and all together on nothing ; as the Hindoos made the world rest on an elephant, the elephant on a tortoise, and the tortoise on a serpent, and had nothing to put under the serpent.
Seite 251 - I have met with but one or two persons in the course of my life who understood the art of Walking, that is, of taking walks — who had a genius, so to speak, for sauntering, which word is beautifully derived 'from idle people who roved about the country, in the Middle Ages, and asked charity, under pretense of going a la Sainte Terre,' to the Holy Land, till the children exclaimed, 'There goes a Sainte-Terrer,
Seite 386 - He hath laid my vine waste, and barked my fig tree: he hath made it clean bare, and cast it away ; the branches thereof are made white.
Seite 408 - The catechism says that the chief end of man is to glorify God and enjoy him forever, which of course is applicable mainly to God as seen in his works.
Seite 176 - And he had lain beside his asses, On lofty Cheviot hills; " And he had trudged through Yorkshire dales, Among the rocks and winding scars, Where deep and low the hamlets lie Beneath their little patch of sky, And little lot of stars.

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