The Raven and the Lark: Lost Children in Literature of the English Renaissance

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Bucknell University Press, 1985 - 228 Seiten
The lost child plot, which appears in the work of virtually every major author of the English Renaissance, is examined in this study of a wide variety of the literature of that period.
 

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Inhalt

The Affinities of Kind The Literary Formula
13
The Affinities of Kind The Renaissance Context
18
Finders Keepers Preservation and the Legendary Foundling
27
Finding and Losing Beaulté and Noblesse Adoption in Malorys Works
40
Transformation in Sidneys Old Arcadia
54
Spenserian Hesitation
68
Two Irreconcilable Foundlings The Love Story and the Saint Story in Book 1 of The Faerie Queene
70
Two Creations Succession and Generation in Books 3 through 5 of The Faerie Queene
84
Earned Reprieve in The Comedy of Errors and Pericles
133
The Dream of a Better Life in As You Like It and Antony and Cleopatra
143
A Manly Loss
158
Hamlets Story or The Childs Refusal to Man the Father
159
A World Within Found Enclosure and Final Exposure in King Lear
170
Becoming the Story in The Winters Tale
178
Telling the Story in The Tempest
192
The Findings of Loss
202

Two Recreations Pastorellas Return and the Poets Emergence in Book 6 of The Faerie Queene
96
Shakespearean Explorations
107
Richard III and Genesis 4
108
Romeo Juliet and the Art of Naming Love
117
A Womanly Discovery
131

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Seite 22 - I am in presence either of father or mother, whether I speak, keep silence, sit, stand, or go, eat, drink, be merry or sad, be sewing, playing, dancing, or doing anything else, I must do it, as it were, in such weight, measure, and number, even so perfectly as God made the world...

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