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Revolution in 1688, no Contract or Promise,

6255ådan of the Turks Inhabitants, Ekzem,

Rhodes, Number of its Inhabitants, 237.
Riches, why the Object of Pride or Esteem,

383, 446.
Rochefoucaltu, quoted, 393, 435.
Rome, 37, 58, 61, 241.
Rome, antient, its Size and Number of Inha.

bitants, 237.
- Name of its tutelar Deity concealed,

510.
Romans, when most corrupt, 16, antiendly

Pyrates, 152, their Government under

the Empire not burthensome, 164, 165.
Roman Empire whether advantageous, 249.
Roundhead Party, 43.
Rousseau, quoted, 79.
Rowe, Mr. his Tragedy censured, 133.

S.

CADDER contains little Morality, 525.

Sallee, Prince of, his Saying of De Ruy-
ter, 515.
SALLUST quoted, 60, 79, 161, 223, 241,

436, 445, 525, 527.
Saint Evremond's Character of Turenne, 441.

quoted, 449.
Sannazarius, Censure of his Pastorals, 429.
Scapulaire, what, 508.
SCEPTIC'SM, 299, 307, excessive, 366,

&c. moderate, 366, with regard to the
Senses, 365, with Regard to Reason,

369, Religious, 529.
Sceptic, the, 97.
Sciences, their Division, 374.
Scholastic Religion, its usual Absurdity, 513.
Scobel quoted, 233.
Scriptures, holy, quoted, 408, 438.
Scriptural and traditional Religions com-

pared, 518.
Selflh and social not opposite, 465.
Self-Love not the Foundation of moral Senti-

ment, 460.
Seneca quoted, 212, 214, 216, 218, 404,

439, 48, 500, 521.
Seneca the Elder quoted, 217.
Sermons, English and French, their Charac-

ter, 67.
Sentiment, how far the Source of Morals,

397, 467.
Sextus EMPIRICUS quoted, 218, 406,

421, soi, 521.

Shaftesbury, Lord, quoted, 29, 58, 82, 109,

205.
Shakespeare, his Artifice in Othello, 132,

quoted, 449.
Simplicity in Writing, 115.
Slavery prejudicial to Populousness, 212.

to Humanity, 210.
Sneezing, God of, 495.
Socrates, his Character, 451.
Soil, very fertile, no Advantage, 156.
Soldier, his Character, 120.
Soldiers, what proportion they commonly

bear to the People, 151.
Sophocles, his Character, 117.
Spain, antient and modern, its Inhabitants,

248.
Spaniard, his Politeness, 454.
Sparta, its Policy, 151. Number of its In-

habitants, 238.
Spartian quoted, 240, 517.
Spencer quoted, 267, 451.
Sportula, their bad Tendency, 248.
Stanyan, quoted, 185.
Statés fmall, their Advantage, 219.
Stoic, the, 90.
Stoics, their Idea of Providence, 339.
- their Superstition, 519.
STRABO quoted, 122, 196, 212, 214, 216,

231, 233, 234, 239, 241, 242, 243,

245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 498, 511.
Stuart Family, whether their Succession ought

to have been retained, 265, wliether re-

stored, 271.
Subjects particular suit not with Refinement,

149.
Suetonius quoted, 14, 40, 211, 213, 23%,

241, 242, 248, 350, 481, 500, 511, 516,

518.
Suidas quoted, 69, 249.
Superstition defined, 48, 49, &c.
Swift, Dr. quoted, 180, 186, 226, 441.
Sycophant, its original Sense, 179.
SYMPATHY, the great Source of moral Sen-

timent, 428, 448.
Syracuse, its Extent and Number of Inhabi-

tants, 237.

MACITUS, somewhat fuperftitious,
I though profane, 519, quoted, 7, 14,
42, 73, 81, 164, 165, 202, 213, 216, 217,
218, 221, 222, 239, 246, 250, 257, 350,
450, 451, 503, 516, 519.

Tasso

517.

Tasso quoted, 59, 89.

VARRO quoted, 213, 216, 217, 245, 248,
Talte, its Standard, 134.
Taxes, when hurtful, 192, 193.

Vauban quoted, 183.
Temple, Sir Will. 59, 127, 193, 233. Vega, Garcillasso de la, quoted, 177.
Tendency of Actions, not their accidental Verna, its Sense and Inferences from it,

Consequences, regarded in Morals, 432. 213.
TERENCE, his Character, 118,quoted, 82,145. Verney, Paris de, quoted, 168.
Tertullian quoted, 249.

Vespasian, his Miracle, 350.
Thebes, Number of its Inhabitants, 237: Victor, Aurelius, quoted, 240.
Theism, its Origin from Polytheism, 504. Victor, Publius, quoted, 238, 240.
Theism and Polytheism compared, 509, VIRGIL, his Character, 117, quoted, 81,
Theocritus, 231.

248, 404, 445.
Thinkers, abiiruse, how useful, 149, shal Virtue and Vice defined, 399.
low, ibid.

Vis inertiæ, 324.
THUCYDIDES, the first Historian, 231. Vitellius, his Meanness, 450.

- quoted, 15, 168, 151, 185, Vitruvius quoted, 239.
189, 220, 221, 224, 229, 234, 235, Voluntary and involuntary, why made by the
236, 238, 451, 512.

Moderns so essential to Morals, 439.
Thurloe's Letters quoted, 234.

Voltaire quoted, 7, 295.
Timon of Alhens, his Affection to Alci Vopiscus quoted, 237, 240, 242, 243. -
biades, 431.

Voflius quoted, 209, 239, 240.
Timotheus the Poet, his Hymn to Diana,522.
Tillotson, his Argument against the real Pre-
fence, 3+3.

w.
Toleration naturally attends Polytheism, 509.
Tory Party, 43, their speculative system, 252. TIALLACE, Rev. Mr. his Elogy,
Tot, Mons. du, quoted, 167, 195.

208.
Tournefort, Mons. quoted, 113, 245.

Waller, his Character, 86, his Story of
Tragedy, why it pleases, 129.

James I. 266.
Tranquillity of Mind,whence its Merit, 451. Walpole, Sir Robert, his Character, 19.
Treasures, their Effects, 184.

Wisdom, its Merit, whence, 442.
Turkish Government, 195.

Wit or Ingenuity, its Merit, whence, 454.
Tyrannicide, why blameable, 407.. . Whig Party, 43, their speculative System,
Tyrants antient, their Cruelty, 224.

253.
Tyre, Number of its People.

Whitlock quoted, 233.
Wolsey, Cardinal, 81.

Women, timorous and superstitious, 498.
I TNITY of Action, what, 294:

Wonder, the Passion of, inclines us to be-
U Ustariz, Geronimo de, quoted, 210.

lieve Miracles, 347.
U furpation, what, 256.
UTILITY, a Source of Approbation, 406,

why, 423.
Utility to others, 400, to Ourselves, 435.

V ENOPHON, his Superstition, 520.

quoted, 15,58,61, 187,

188, 236, 220, 225, 233, 235, 236,
V ALERIUS Maximus quoted, 239. 237, 238, 246, 445, 481, 500, 510,

V Vanity, allies easily to Virtue, 57, 520, 522.
why blamed, 456.

Xerxes, his Pursuit of New Pleasures, 86

erationty, 43. quotebted, 013

U.

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D AGE 75, Line 2, read Spreads. P. 98, 1. 3, read reduce to it. P. 121, l. 2; in the

I Notes, second Column, dele, who. P. 131. 1. 12, for along read together. P. 134, 1, 6, from the Bottom, read brilliancy. P. 143, I. 13, for Dissertation read Ejay. P. 196, 1. 8, read Arrian. P. 216, I. 20, read Nicias's. P. 230, 1. 6, 7, from the Bottom, for certain read positive. P. 280, 1. 3, for they read may. P. 297, in the Notes, Column 1, 1. I, read is a Connexion, Col. 2. 1. 1, for his read its. P. 337, I. 28, read would here establish. P. 348, l. ult. for dearth read death. P. 349, 1. 27, read enabled. Id. l. 32, read imposture. P. 356, 1. 8 from the Bottom, for these Elays read this Enquiry. P. 375, l. 4, read or some such Fait. P. 378, l. antepen. read allapsus. P. 390, 1. 3, read great. P. 397, 1. 25, read from mere weakness. P. 399, J. 22, for repress read redress. P. 405, 1. 5, read worne. P. 413, l. 12, read being then entirely useless. P. 425, l. 22, read praise. P. 428, l. 9, from the Bottom, read struck with. P. 431, 1. 10, read ascribe to it.. p. 432, 1. 13, read imagine that. P. 434, 1. 25, read Nature. P. 443, 1. 32, for paper read writing. P. 452, l. ult. for usual read useful. P. 455, 1. 7, dele not. P. 457, 1. 24, read an I know not what, P. 459, 1. 5 from the Bottom, for suficient read insufficient. P. 460, l. 34, read point of view. P. 481. d. , read made it appear. i ;

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